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Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate

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  • Nikki Ives
    Hi SACCers! I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I m at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig.  I can t afford to
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi SACCers!


      I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig.  I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days.  I would really like to just teach full-time.  However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up.  I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs.  Cue the violins!


      I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University.  The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology.  It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online.  More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

      So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program?  Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position?  Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?


      Any thoughts?  All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

      Thanks,
      Nikki


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Tim Sullivan
      Nikki: YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
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        Nikki:
        YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
        Best wishes.
        Tim
        Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
        Professor of Anthropology
        Richland College
        12800 Abrams Rd.
        Dallas, TX 75243

        972-238-6959
        tsullivan@...
        >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
        Hi SACCers!


        I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!


        I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

        So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?


        Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

        Thanks,
        Nikki


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gilliland, Mary
        We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
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          We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both Soc & Anthro.

          Another option is to do that Ph. D. but maybe you did Nikki. Increasingly a good choice for CC's and may open other doors too but isn't as broad. And may take more time & money.

          Mary K. Gilliland
          Sent from my iPhone

          On Jun 13, 2013, at 6:29 PM, "Tim Sullivan" <tsullivan@...<mailto:tsullivan@...>> wrote:



          Nikki:
          YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
          Best wishes.
          Tim
          Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
          Professor of Anthropology
          Richland College
          12800 Abrams Rd.
          Dallas, TX 75243

          972-238-6959
          tsullivan@...<mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu>
          >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
          Hi SACCers!

          I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

          I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

          So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

          Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

          Thanks,
          Nikki

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Rebecca Cramer
          Hi Nikki, I, too, was hired to teach both anthro and soc.   Overtime I was able to develop that into a full-time anthro load.   A second certificate can
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
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            Hi Nikki,
            I, too, was hired to teach both anthro and soc.   Overtime I was able to develop that into a full-time anthro load.   A second certificate can only help.   Good luck!
            Rebecca

            ==============
            Rebecca Cramer
            missiontosonora@...
            http://rcramer.web.arizona.edu


            ________________________________
            From: "Gilliland, Mary" <mkgilliland@...>
            To: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com" <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
            Cc: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com" <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:41 PM
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate

             

            We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both Soc & Anthro.

            Another option is to do that Ph. D. but maybe you did Nikki. Increasingly a good choice for CC's and may open other doors too but isn't as broad. And may take more time & money.

            Mary K. Gilliland
            Sent from my iPhone

            On Jun 13, 2013, at 6:29 PM, "Tim Sullivan" <mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<mailto:mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu>> wrote:



            Nikki:
            YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
            Best wishes.
            Tim
            Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
            Professor of Anthropology
            Richland College
            12800 Abrams Rd.
            Dallas, TX 75243

            972-238-6959
            mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu>
            >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
            Hi SACCers!

            I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

            I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

            So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

            Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

            Thanks,
            Nikki

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Mark Lewine
            Yes, I never would have had the chance to teach anthro as there was only 2 sections taught when I started...I had a ‘double master’s’ degree from Kent
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Yes, I never would have had the chance to teach anthro as there was only 2 sections taught when I started...I had a ‘double master’s’ degree from Kent State because the departments were combined...and my B.A. was with a soc. major at Case Western Reserve...they really hired me to teach sociology and an integrated social science curriculum (for vocational program students and for ESL students). By the way, the integrated program was a terrific idea and fascinating to teach and work from. I have never believed that these false academic boundaries and theoretical ‘separations’ were valid or productive.

              From: Rebecca Cramer
              Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 10:26 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate


              Hi Nikki,
              I, too, was hired to teach both anthro and soc. Overtime I was able to develop that into a full-time anthro load. A second certificate can only help. Good luck!
              Rebecca

              ==============
              Rebecca Cramer
              mailto:missiontosonora%40yahoo.com
              http://rcramer.web.arizona.edu


              ________________________________
              From: "Gilliland, Mary" <mailto:mkgilliland%40pima.edu>
              To: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
              Cc: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:41 PM
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate



              We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both Soc & Anthro.

              Another option is to do that Ph. D. but maybe you did Nikki. Increasingly a good choice for CC's and may open other doors too but isn't as broad. And may take more time & money.

              Mary K. Gilliland
              Sent from my iPhone

              On Jun 13, 2013, at 6:29 PM, "Tim Sullivan" <mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<mailto:mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu>> wrote:

              Nikki:
              YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
              Best wishes.
              Tim
              Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
              Professor of Anthropology
              Richland College
              12800 Abrams Rd.
              Dallas, TX 75243

              972-238-6959
              mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu>
              >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
              Hi SACCers!

              I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

              I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

              So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

              Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

              Thanks,
              Nikki

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Suzanne Baldon
              Yes, Nikki, do it! I earned my MA in Anthropology from a Sociology and Anthropology Dept. I taught Sociology first, then added Anthropology. Now I teach
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 13, 2013
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                Yes, Nikki, do it! I earned my MA in Anthropology from a Sociology and Anthropology Dept. I taught Sociology first, then added Anthropology. Now I teach Criminal Justice and am finishing my PhD in a Transdisciplinary program.

                Enjoy!
                Suz 😄

                Suzanne Baldon's iPhone

                By words the mind is winged. -Aristophanes, dramatist 📖✈


                On Jun 13, 2013, at 9:46 PM, "Mark Lewine" <mlewine@...<mailto:mlewine@...>> wrote:



                Yes, I never would have had the chance to teach anthro as there was only 2 sections taught when I started...I had a ‘double master’s’ degree from Kent State because the departments were combined...and my B.A. was with a soc. major at Case Western Reserve...they really hired me to teach sociology and an integrated social science curriculum (for vocational program students and for ESL students). By the way, the integrated program was a terrific idea and fascinating to teach and work from. I have never believed that these false academic boundaries and theoretical ‘separations’ were valid or productive.

                From: Rebecca Cramer
                Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 10:26 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate

                Hi Nikki,
                I, too, was hired to teach both anthro and soc. Overtime I was able to develop that into a full-time anthro load. A second certificate can only help. Good luck!
                Rebecca

                ==============
                Rebecca Cramer
                mailto:missiontosonora%40yahoo.com<http://40yahoo.com>
                http://rcramer.web.arizona.edu

                ________________________________
                From: "Gilliland, Mary" <mailto:mkgilliland%40pima.edu<http://40pima.edu>>
                To: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>>
                Cc: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>>
                Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:41 PM
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate

                We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both Soc & Anthro.

                Another option is to do that Ph. D. but maybe you did Nikki. Increasingly a good choice for CC's and may open other doors too but isn't as broad. And may take more time & money.

                Mary K. Gilliland
                Sent from my iPhone

                On Jun 13, 2013, at 6:29 PM, "Tim Sullivan" <mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu><mailto:mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu>>> wrote:

                Nikki:
                YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
                Best wishes.
                Tim
                Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
                Professor of Anthropology
                Richland College
                12800 Abrams Rd.
                Dallas, TX 75243

                972-238-6959
                mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu><mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu>>
                >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
                Hi SACCers!

                I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

                I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

                So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

                Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

                Thanks,
                Nikki

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Anthropmor
                I m in the sam e boat , friend- hang in there. Mike Pavlik ... From: Nikki Ives To: SACC-L Sent: Thu, Jun 13, 2013
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 14, 2013
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                  I'm in the sam e boat , friend- hang in there.
                  Mike Pavlik



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Nikki Ives <ikkinh@...>
                  To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thu, Jun 13, 2013 6:57 pm
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate




                  Hi SACCers!

                  I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

                  I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

                  So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

                  Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

                  Thanks,
                  Nikki

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Sydney Hart
                  I m of mixed minds, Nikki. There is no question that I got hired into my full time position because I can teach both Anthropology and Sociology (MA in Anthro,
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 14, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I'm of mixed minds, Nikki. There is no question that I got hired into my full time position because I can teach both Anthropology and Sociology (MA in Anthro, PhD in Soc). However, I'm not seeing very much full-time hiring at all. In our college, we frequently have to fight (and frequently lose) even replacing retired or terminated full-timers, even in our most sought-after social science--Psychology. I started adjuncting full time in 2000 and got my full time job in 2006. It took a bloody long time.

                    A second issue is that not all colleges accept online degrees. I don't know much about this and it may be idiosyncratic of a single administrator (who has since retired) in our district, but they would not accept even accredited online degrees for full-timers.

                    I hate to be the voice of despair, especially since I managed to get out of the boat you are in. At the same time, I want to acknowledge the nasty state of education in the U.S. right now.

                    Sydney


                    Sydney Hart, Ph.D.

                    Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Sociology

                    Wilbur Wright College

                    4300 North Narragansett Avenue

                    Chicago, Illinois 60634

                    ________________________________
                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Nikki Ives [ikkinh@...]
                    Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:57 PM
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate



                    Hi SACCers!

                    I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

                    I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

                    So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

                    Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

                    Thanks,
                    Nikki

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • <dianne.chidester@...>
                    Nikki, I m afraid my comments ae a second to Sydney s. I have 24 cr hrs towards a master s in Sociology. I was hired here in a soc position, but they liked
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 14, 2013
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                      Nikki,

                      I'm afraid my comments ae a second to Sydney's. I have 24 cr hrs towards a master's in Sociology. I was hired here in a soc position, but they liked that I could teach some anthro. Every semester I teach more soc than anthro. Also, we're not hiring. In fact, there are rumors going around that because of changes in health care policy, our adjuncts will only be allowed to teach three classes and the full-timers will have to pick up the slack.

                      Keep the faith. It took me a couple of years to find this position. I even considered going back to get a certificate for teaching high school. I was lucky that I was able to apply just about any where. I didn't have any roots.

                      Also, the hiring system is not at all polite. Even places where I interviewed in person didn't have the courtesy to send a rejection letter.

                      --Dianne

                      ________________________________________
                      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Sydney Hart [shart9@...]
                      Sent: Friday, June 14, 2013 11:18 AM
                      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate

                      I'm of mixed minds, Nikki. There is no question that I got hired into my full time position because I can teach both Anthropology and Sociology (MA in Anthro, PhD in Soc). However, I'm not seeing very much full-time hiring at all. In our college, we frequently have to fight (and frequently lose) even replacing retired or terminated full-timers, even in our most sought-after social science--Psychology. I started adjuncting full time in 2000 and got my full time job in 2006. It took a bloody long time.

                      A second issue is that not all colleges accept online degrees. I don't know much about this and it may be idiosyncratic of a single administrator (who has since retired) in our district, but they would not accept even accredited online degrees for full-timers.

                      I hate to be the voice of despair, especially since I managed to get out of the boat you are in. At the same time, I want to acknowledge the nasty state of education in the U.S. right now.

                      Sydney


                      Sydney Hart, Ph.D.

                      Assistant Professor, Anthropology and Sociology

                      Wilbur Wright College

                      4300 North Narragansett Avenue

                      Chicago, Illinois 60634

                      ________________________________
                      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Nikki Ives [ikkinh@...]
                      Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:57 PM
                      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate



                      Hi SACCers!

                      I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!

                      I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf

                      So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?

                      Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!

                      Thanks,
                      Nikki

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                    • Lloyd Miller
                      Hi Nikki, I m a day late in reading your message and many have already offered their two cents worth, but I ll add mine anyway. My background is a master s
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 14, 2013
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Hi Nikki, I'm a day late in reading your message and many have already offered their two cents worth, but I'll add mine anyway.

                        My background is a master's plus in Ibero-American Studies, that includes completed coursework for masters in anthropology and Spanish, with minors in Latin American Studies and Portuguese, plus an additional year toward a PhD in Spanish (language and linguistics). Both of the community colleges at which I was hired to teach Spanish were start-ups (1968 & 1970). In both places, after I was hired, I offered to teach anthropology. Since both colleges were building curriculum, the deans in each case thought that was a real plus--two for the price of one, so to speak. So for my entire 32-year community college career, I taught in both subject areas.

                        As you see by the responses, nearly all community college instructors teach in several disciplines. I would recommend checking out the Appalachian State online program. The courses offered that they present on their website look like the ones you would likely teach, and you would be able to transfer much of your anthropology background and experience to the task. If the tuition and expenses are doable, I think the additional certificate would definitely enhance your community college employability.

                        Best of luck!

                        Lloyd



                        On Jun 13, 2013, at 10:18 PM, Suzanne Baldon wrote:

                        > Yes, Nikki, do it! I earned my MA in Anthropology from a Sociology and Anthropology Dept. I taught Sociology first, then added Anthropology. Now I teach Criminal Justice and am finishing my PhD in a Transdisciplinary program.
                        >
                        > Enjoy!
                        > Suz 😄
                        >
                        > Suzanne Baldon's iPhone
                        >
                        > By words the mind is winged. -Aristophanes, dramatist 📖✈
                        >
                        >
                        > On Jun 13, 2013, at 9:46 PM, "Mark Lewine" <mlewine@...<mailto:mlewine@...>> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > Yes, I never would have had the chance to teach anthro as there was only 2 sections taught when I started...I had a ‘double master’s’ degree from Kent State because the departments were combined...and my B.A. was with a soc. major at Case Western Reserve...they really hired me to teach sociology and an integrated social science curriculum (for vocational program students and for ESL students). By the way, the integrated program was a terrific idea and fascinating to teach and work from. I have never believed that these false academic boundaries and theoretical ‘separations’ were valid or productive.
                        >
                        > From: Rebecca Cramer
                        > Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 10:26 PM
                        > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                        > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate
                        >
                        > Hi Nikki,
                        > I, too, was hired to teach both anthro and soc. Overtime I was able to develop that into a full-time anthro load. A second certificate can only help. Good luck!
                        > Rebecca
                        >
                        > ==============
                        > Rebecca Cramer
                        > mailto:missiontosonora%40yahoo.com<http://40yahoo.com>
                        > http://rcramer.web.arizona.edu
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        > From: "Gilliland, Mary" <mailto:mkgilliland%40pima.edu<http://40pima.edu>>
                        > To: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>>
                        > Cc: "mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>" <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com<http://40yahoogroups.com>>
                        > Sent: Thursday, June 13, 2013 6:41 PM
                        > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Career Advice - Sociology Graduate Certificate
                        >
                        > We are seeing some of the same here at Pima. While we have a rich anthro program 3 of our full time people district wide have dual degrees and teach in both Soc & Anthro.
                        >
                        > Another option is to do that Ph. D. but maybe you did Nikki. Increasingly a good choice for CC's and may open other doors too but isn't as broad. And may take more time & money.
                        >
                        > Mary K. Gilliland
                        > Sent from my iPhone
                        >
                        > On Jun 13, 2013, at 6:29 PM, "Tim Sullivan" <mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu><mailto:mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu>>> wrote:
                        >
                        > Nikki:
                        > YES. When I landed my job with Dallas County, (and this was many moons ago!), one of the main assets I had was an MA plus the minimum 18 graduate hours in sociology. (There weren't very many of us at that time). I know that most of the positions open in community colleges these days for 'weak' areas is open for those who have credentials in two or more related teaching fields. I taught for Sociology (most of my load) and anthropology whenever I could get classes to make for most of my career. The minimum requirement, as you know, is an MA and at least 18o graduate hours in the field in which you teach. Of course, most of the positions will likely be Sociology, but the additional anthropology, will certainly help. Of course, this is no guarantee, of course. But I think it would be a plus if you are determined to pursue a career in academia.
                        > Best wishes.
                        > Tim
                        > Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
                        > Professor of Anthropology
                        > Richland College
                        > 12800 Abrams Rd.
                        > Dallas, TX 75243
                        >
                        > 972-238-6959
                        > mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu><mailto:tsullivan%40dcccd.edu<http://40dcccd.edu>>
                        > >>> Nikki Ives 06/13/13 6:57 PM >>>
                        > Hi SACCers!
                        >
                        > I am hoping some of you can offer some career advice. I'm at the end of my rope here with this office job/adjunct teaching gig. I can't afford to only adjunct and I am not happy working an office job so, career-wise, I am feeling very frustrated these days. I would really like to just teach full-time. However, the full-time anthro positions at the community college level are few and far-between and it is apparently very difficult to secure one of these few positions once they open up. I've applied for a few over the past year and have not received any call backs. Cue the violins!
                        >
                        > I stumbled across a sociology graduate certificate offered through Appalachian State University. The certificate is for people who already have a master's degree and would like to teach sociology. It is a one-year program - 18 credit hours entirely online. More info can be found here: http://soc.appstate.edu/sites/soc.appstate.edu/files/documents/brochure.pdf
                        >
                        > So, my question to all of you is - do you think it would be worth my time - and more importantly, my money - to complete this certificate program? Do you think it would help me get a full-time teaching position? Or, do you think it would just be a waste of time and money?
                        >
                        > Any thoughts? All comments are welcome and appreciated!!
                        >
                        > Thanks,
                        > Nikki
                        >
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