Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

More student answers!

Expand Messages
  • Jessica Amato
    Hi all— I have pretty much been a lurker, but I want to definitely post more to this great group! Happy to share the greatest response I have ever seen to my
    Message 1 of 5 , May 3, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all� I have pretty much been a lurker, but I want to definitely post
      more to this great group! Happy to share the greatest response I have ever
      seen to my question (written) from Mesoamerican Archaeology. The question
      was, "Explain the emergence of corn/maiz in the Tehuacan Valley and discuss
      its ancestral links, if any, to teosinte."

      Here's the answer: Corn is amazingly necessary for everything and whoever
      came up with creating corn is an awesome person.

      *sigh!*

      Thanks, Jessica Amato

      --
      Jessica V. Amato, Ph.D.
      jvamato@...
      http://www.linkedin.com/in/jessamato


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • <dianne.chidester@...>
      The son of a friend teaches high school biology. He gave students an article to read and summarize. One student wrote: Pigeons evolve into ducks at Disney
      Message 2 of 5 , May 3, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        The son of a friend teaches high school biology. He gave students an article to read and summarize. One student wrote:

        "Pigeons evolve into ducks at Disney World."

        Here's the article:

        Disney Halts Pigeons' Show As Sitting Ducks For Hungry Hawks

        July 19, 2002|By Todd Pack, Sentinel Staff Writer
        Call it the circle of life -- hungry hawks swooping in and devouring the pigeons released in a flourish at shows and weddings throughout Disney World.

        The pigeons, used in shows such as Cinderella's Surprise Celebration at the Magic Kingdom and Beauty and the Beast at Disney-MGM Studios, became sitting ducks when red-tailed hawks figured out they could count on an easy meal at the same time every day.

        But disturbed by the thought of sending the birds to almost certain death, Disney this week stopped releasing the homing pigeons -- ending a tradition that began about 30 years ago.

        During the shows, the birds soared over the parks before returning to nearby roosts. It was during these flights that the defenseless birds were grabbed by the hawks' sharp talons, Disney spokeswoman Diane Ledder said.

        It was only recently that the savvy hawks began snatching the birds, Ledder said. No visitors complained about seeing the midair attacks, she added.

        Red-tailed hawks, with their wingspread of about 50 inches, thrive in the undisturbed wilderness around the Disney parks, said Geri Hylander, education and volunteer program coordinator at the Audubon Center for Birds of Prey in Maitland.

        Hylander said the hawks aren't especially aggressive, but "they're opportunistic."

        "When you release a group of birds like that," she said of Disney's pigeons, "it's an invitation to a meal."

        Facing an enemy that large and determined, the comparatively frail pigeons, with their wingspreads of about 15 inches, didn't stand a chance. Disney wouldn't say how many birds were killed.

        Red-tailed hawks, the largest found in Central Florida, are a protected species, meaning it's illegal to disturb them without the permission of state wildlife officials.

        Disney didn't consider trying to move the hawks, Ledder said. "If you looked at trapping and relocating them, they'd probably be back."

        So, this week, Disney officials decided "it wasn't fair to the pigeons to keep releasing them," Ledder said.

        Disney is now trying to find homes for about 200 surviving pigeons. Ledder said it will reassign the five employees who had been in charge of the birds.

        Red-tailed hawks typically eat smaller birds, snakes and rodents.

        No word on whether Mickey is in any danger.


        -----Original Message-----
        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jessica Amato
        Sent: Friday, May 03, 2013 1:39 PM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SACC-L] More student answers!

        Hi all- I have pretty much been a lurker, but I want to definitely post more to this great group! Happy to share the greatest response I have ever seen to my question (written) from Mesoamerican Archaeology. The question was, "Explain the emergence of corn/maiz in the Tehuacan Valley and discuss its ancestral links, if any, to teosinte."

        Here's the answer: Corn is amazingly necessary for everything and whoever came up with creating corn is an awesome person.

        *sigh!*

        Thanks, Jessica Amato

        --
        Jessica V. Amato, Ph.D.
        jvamato@...
        http://www.linkedin.com/in/jessamato


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        ------------------------------------

        Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links




        This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.
      • Tim Sullivan
        Most know that I am also an historian, and that my dissertation research was on atlantic piracy. I cannot claim this one from any of my own, but it has always
        Message 3 of 5 , May 3, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Most know that I am also an historian, and that my dissertation research
          was on atlantic piracy. I cannot claim this one from any of my own, but
          it has always been a favorite: Some may recall that " Sir Francis
          Drake circumcised the globe with a 50 foot clipper."
          Tim
          Timothy L. Sullivan, Ph.D.
          Professor of Anthropology
          Richland College
          12800 Abrams Rd.
          Dallas, TX 75243

          972-238-6959
          tsullivan@...
          >>> Jessica Amato 05/03/13 12:39 PM >>>
          Hi all* I have pretty much been a lurker, but I want to definitely post
          more to this great group! Happy to share the greatest response I have
          ever
          seen to my question (written) from Mesoamerican Archaeology. The
          question
          was, "Explain the emergence of corn/maiz in the Tehuacan Valley and
          discuss
          its ancestral links, if any, to teosinte."

          Here's the answer: Corn is amazingly necessary for everything and
          whoever
          came up with creating corn is an awesome person.

          *sigh!*

          Thanks, Jessica Amato

          --
          Jessica V. Amato, Ph.D.
          jvamato@...
          http://www.linkedin.com/in/jessamato


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
        • Nina Brown
          Here is a good one from today s final exams: Anthropology is not a science because anthropologists do experiments, but not with chemicals. Nina [Non-text
          Message 4 of 5 , May 16, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            Here is a good one from today's final exams:



            "Anthropology is not a science because anthropologists do experiments, but
            not with chemicals."



            Nina





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Andrew Petto
            Obviously someone who has never observed anthropologists in the field! Lotsa chemical experimentation there! Anj ... -- Andrew J Petto, PhD Senior Lecturer
            Message 5 of 5 , May 16, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              Obviously someone who has never observed anthropologists in the field!

              Lotsa chemical experimentation there!

              Anj

              On 2013-05-16 15:27, Nina Brown wrote:
              >
              > Here is a good one from today's final exams:
              >
              > "Anthropology is not a science because anthropologists do experiments, but
              > not with chemicals."
              >
              > Nina
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >

              --

              Andrew J Petto, PhD
              Senior Lecturer
              Department of Biological Sciences
              University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
              PO Box 413
              Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
              CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
              Telephone: 414-229-6784
              FAX: 414-229-3926
              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

              Could you be a teacher?
              <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>

              *************
              Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
              *************



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.