Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Greetings & Top Ten List (sorry for the reposts)

Expand Messages
  • T
    Thank you, Oona, Bob, and Laura, these are all book that I have not read so the list is helpful. The only title I know is The Reluctant Mr. Darwin, by David
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 29, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you, Oona, Bob, and Laura, these are all book that I have not read so the list is helpful. The only title I know is 'The Reluctant Mr. Darwin,' by David Quammen and I am surprised to see it suggested as I was under the impression that it was primarliy about the life of Charles Darwin, but I only know of the book from conversations on the net so my knowledge is limited.

      Thanks & Regards,

      Timothy E. Kennelly
      (Tim)


      --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Laura Gonzalez <ltgonzalez@...> wrote:
      >
      > Tim, since you and I spoke off list, I know that you might be interested in biological (physical) anthropology. I'm trained as a cultural anthropologist, but have been teaching physical for over 10 years. Many of us could probably list the "classics" of theory that we had to read in school (Durkheim, Fraser, Tylor, etc.) but as teachers in mostly community colleges, we tend to focus on more concrete and graspable ways to teach our subjects, bringing in theory in ways that are relevant to students' lives (at least, we hope).
      >
      > So while I can't really offer a list of classic theoretical books, let me add a few that I've enjoyed from a bio anth perspective that are geared toward a general readership or towards students.
      >
      > 'The Reluctant Mr. Darwin,' by David Quammen - about the life of Darwin and the theory of natural selection
      >
      > 'Skin, A Natural History' by Nina Jablonski - about human skin, the development of its attributes (including pigmentation), and the myth of "race"
      >
      > Biological Anthropology course readers, such as the one I use by Michael A. Park or Angeloni's "Annual Editions" - these often contain "classic" articles that span the field from genetics to primates to human development and variation.
      >
      > Laura
      >
      > On Apr 29, 2013, at 11:16 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:
      >
      > And I'll had a few books that I think may meet your criteria (considered by at least some to be classics,; grounded in theory; and readable by a novice).
      >
      > 'Cows, Pigs, Wars, and Witches' by Marvin Harris (focus on theory)
      >
      > 'In Small Things Forgotten: An Archaeology of Early American Life' by James Deetz (focus on historical arch)
      >
      > 'The Early Mesoamerican Village' by Kent Flannery (novices might think it is mostly about Mesoamerica, but it is really about archaeological theory)
      >
      > Bob
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Oona Schmid
      > Sent: Monday, April 29, 2013 10:49 AM
      > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Greetings & Top Ten List (sorry for the reposts)
      >
      > I'm surprised no one has responded to you, but I'll bite.
      >
      > Body Ritual Among the Nacerima, Horace Miner, is a wonderful and inventive way of showing people what the power of anthropological inquiry can do. In other words, anthropologists believe culture is nearly invisible to its participants, that culture is in the assumptions taken for granted in how society is organized, codes of behavior, and so forth.
      > http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1525/aa.1956.58.3.02a00080/abstract
      >
      > SACC notes also did a very good piece on teaching with this article in its Fall 2003 issue by Dorothy Davis.
      >
      > Conrad Kottak did an abbreviated textbook WINDOW ON HUMANITY that has much to recommend in terms of brevity, clarity, and integration of subfields.
      >
      > While less scholarly, there are also two examples of anthropological inquiry on the TED site that really speak to the power of anthropology.
      >
      > http://www.ted.com/talks/helen_fisher_studies_the_brain_in_love.html?quote=313
      > http://www.ted.com/talks/wade_davis_on_the_worldwide_web_of_belief_and_ritual.html
      >
      > On Fri, Apr 26, 2013 at 11:06 AM, T <timothyekennelly@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Greetings,
      > >
      > > I am new to your list and I am not an anthropologist. I have become
      > > interested in anthropology by way of two books by Jonathan Mark which
      > > I found exceptionally good.
      > > I have a question (remember here that I am pretty ignorant of the field).
      > > If you
      > > were to recommend a top ten list of anthropological works which might
      > > make one formiliar with the field, what would they be?
      > >
      > > I will note that my strongest interests are likely in theory and I
      > > will further suggest a preference for works that help shaped the field
      > > and are historically important for that reason. I know the field is
      > > complex and made up of sub-fields, but I lack the confidence to ask
      > > the question about specific sub-fields.
      > >
      > > So I might put the question this way in the shortest possible form:
      > > "What ten books, in your opinion, if carefully read, would turn a
      > > novice into one who at least has a fair taste of the field you have
      > > invested so much of your lives in?"
      > >
      > > Thanks & Regards,
      > >
      > > Timothy E. Kennelly
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.