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Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

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  • Mark Lewine
    This “Student Success” phrase is another corporate brand that was pushed out into the standardized national education scene by the Gates Foundation a few
    Message 1 of 19 , Mar 19 9:38 AM
    • 0 Attachment
      This “Student Success” phrase is another corporate brand that was pushed out into the standardized national education scene by the Gates Foundation a few years ago, with the ever present corporate front man for community colleges, Mark Milliron! Google this guy sometime and look at what he has had his finger into and you will see where about half of these branded programs for faculty come from...Cuyahoga’s President Thornton (finally retiring, after chairing the last AACC white paper commission on our community college future: “Achieve the Dream”, Student Success, more wealthy suburban cc district campuses, fewer resources “wasted” on the inner city and poor rural campuses as they are ‘too inefficient’ in percentage of “successful graduates”, (so just build where the wealthy live so they can see where their tax money goes and gets “success”). Mission? What Mission?, Close that door, when it is open I feel the draft of poor women going in and out of their community college classes, taking 8 years of persistence because they do not have day care, do not have easy access medical care even in Obama’s half-a-loaf medical plan, and have too little from federal grants and college tuition plans to pay off owed fees every term, and are now dropped for non-payment.

      From: Anthropmor
      Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:59 AM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning




      In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered

      this is going on in Illinois, as well
      Mike Pavlik

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Philip Stein <mailto:stein39%40att.net>
      To: SACC-L <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

      Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.

      No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!

      I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.

      Phil

      --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu> wrote:

      From: Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu>
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
      To: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com
      Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM

      What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.

      In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget crisis will lead to further
      pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.

      In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.

      This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.

      This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".

      There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.

      kip

      Kip Waldo
      Dept. of Anthropology
      Chabot College
      25555 Hesperian Blvd.
      Hayward, CA 94545

      mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu
      voice 510.723.6980

      >>> Andrew Petto <mailto:ajpetto%40uwm.edu> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
      Here is another one relevant to CCs:
      http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx

      My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
      Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
      that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
      the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
      done, but with a new technology.

      There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
      been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
      lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
      will keep looking.

      Here is another example:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion

      How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
      learning?

      Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
      and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
      not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
      like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
      landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
      using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
      the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
      have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
      and I was not likely to be.

      Anj

      On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
      >
      > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
      > Nature.
      >
      > Online learning: Campus 2.0
      >
      > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      --

      Andrew J Petto, PhD
      Senior Lecturer
      Department of Biological Sciences
      University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
      PO Box 413
      Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
      CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
      Telephone: 414-229-6784
      FAX: 414-229-3926
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

      Could you be a teacher?
      <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>

      *************
      Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
      *************

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • frank lagana
      ... -- Something very similar is also going on at the City University of NY; it s called Pathways . Same general strategy; reduce the number of hours in
      Message 2 of 19 , Mar 19 12:01 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        >In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a
        >focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State
        >University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a
        >broader range of classes from being offered
        --

        Something very similar is also going on at the City University of NY; it's
        called "Pathways". Same general strategy; reduce the number of hours in
        required courses at the system's community colleges, cut down on electives,
        etc. All presented of course as in the best interests of the students.

        frank
        *Keep an open mind - but not so open that your brains fall out.*


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • frank lagana
        ... -- *Keep an open mind - but not so open that your brains fall out.* [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Message 3 of 19 , Mar 19 12:03 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          On Tue, Mar 19, 2013 at 3:01 PM, frank lagana <frank11217@...> wrote:

          >
          > >In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a
          > >focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State
          > >University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a
          > >broader range of classes from being offered
          > --
          >
          > Something very similar is also going on at the City University of NY; it's
          > called "Pathways". Same general strategy; reduce the number of hours in
          > required courses at the system's community colleges, cut down on electives,
          > etc. All presented of course as in the best interests of the students.
          >
          > frank
          > *Keep an open mind - but not so open that your brains fall out.*
          >



          --
          *Keep an open mind - but not so open that your brains fall out.*


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Ninivaggi, Cynthia
          Mark, do you keep an education blog? If you do I d love to follow it. Great points here. ... From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On
          Message 4 of 19 , Mar 19 12:55 PM
          • 0 Attachment
            Mark, do you keep an education blog? If you do I'd love to follow it. Great points here.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Lewine
            Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 12:39 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

            This “Student Success” phrase is another corporate brand that was pushed out into the standardized national education scene by the Gates Foundation a few years ago, with the ever present corporate front man for community colleges, Mark Milliron! Google this guy sometime and look at what he has had his finger into and you will see where about half of these branded programs for faculty come from...Cuyahoga’s President Thornton (finally retiring, after chairing the last AACC white paper commission on our community college future: “Achieve the Dream”, Student Success, more wealthy suburban cc district campuses, fewer resources “wasted” on the inner city and poor rural campuses as they are ‘too inefficient’ in percentage of “successful graduates”, (so just build where the wealthy live so they can see where their tax money goes and gets “success”). Mission? What Mission?, Close that door, when it is open I feel the draft of poor women going in and out of their community college classes, taking 8 years of persistence because they do not have day care, do not have easy access medical care even in Obama’s half-a-loaf medical plan, and have too little from federal grants and college tuition plans to pay off owed fees every term, and are now dropped for non-payment.

            From: Anthropmor
            Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:59 AM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning




            In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered

            this is going on in Illinois, as well
            Mike Pavlik

            -----Original Message-----
            From: Philip Stein <mailto:stein39%40att.net>
            To: SACC-L <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

            Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.

            No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!

            I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.

            Phil

            --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu> wrote:

            From: Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu>
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
            To: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com
            Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM

            What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.

            In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget crisis will lead to further pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.

            In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.

            This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.

            This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".

            There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.

            kip

            Kip Waldo
            Dept. of Anthropology
            Chabot College
            25555 Hesperian Blvd.
            Hayward, CA 94545

            mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu
            voice 510.723.6980

            >>> Andrew Petto <mailto:ajpetto%40uwm.edu> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
            Here is another one relevant to CCs:
            http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx

            My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past, the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always done, but with a new technology.

            There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I will keep looking.

            Here is another example:
            http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion

            How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to learning?

            Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end, and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not; and I was not likely to be.

            Anj

            On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
            >
            > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
            > Nature.
            >
            > Online learning: Campus 2.0
            >
            > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            --

            Andrew J Petto, PhD
            Senior Lecturer
            Department of Biological Sciences
            University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
            PO Box 413
            Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
            CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
            Telephone: 414-229-6784
            FAX: 414-229-3926
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

            Could you be a teacher?
            <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>

            *************
            Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
            *************

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Mark Lewine
            Thanks, Cynthia! No, I am in the most exhausting 7 day work week that I have ever had...in retirement no less...care-giving for my loved partner Sally who has
            Message 5 of 19 , Mar 19 1:12 PM
            • 0 Attachment
              Thanks, Cynthia! No, I am in the most exhausting 7 day work week that I have ever had...in retirement no less...care-giving for my loved partner Sally who has PD (Parkinson’s Disease) with panic attacks for a little extra kick to the symptom blend...

              From: Ninivaggi, Cynthia
              Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 3:55 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Online Learning


              Mark, do you keep an education blog? If you do I'd love to follow it. Great points here.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com [mailto:mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Lewine
              Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 12:39 PM
              To: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

              This “Student Success” phrase is another corporate brand that was pushed out into the standardized national education scene by the Gates Foundation a few years ago, with the ever present corporate front man for community colleges, Mark Milliron! Google this guy sometime and look at what he has had his finger into and you will see where about half of these branded programs for faculty come from...Cuyahoga’s President Thornton (finally retiring, after chairing the last AACC white paper commission on our community college future: “Achieve the Dream”, Student Success, more wealthy suburban cc district campuses, fewer resources “wasted” on the inner city and poor rural campuses as they are ‘too inefficient’ in percentage of “successful graduates”, (so just build where the wealthy live so they can see where their tax money goes and gets “success”). Mission? What Mission?, Close that door, when it is open I feel the draft of poor women going in and out of their community college classes, taking 8 years of persistence because they do not have day care, do not have easy access medical care even in Obama’s half-a-loaf medical plan, and have too little from federal grants and college tuition plans to pay off owed fees every term, and are now dropped for non-payment.

              From: Anthropmor
              Sent: Tuesday, March 19, 2013 9:59 AM
              To: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning




              In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered

              this is going on in Illinois, as well
              Mike Pavlik

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Philip Stein <mailto:stein39%40att.net>
              To: SACC-L <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning

              Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.

              No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!

              I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.

              Phil

              --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu> wrote:

              From: Kip Waldo <mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu>
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
              To: mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com
              Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM

              What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.

              In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget crisis will lead to further pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.

              In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.

              This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.

              This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".

              There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.

              kip

              Kip Waldo
              Dept. of Anthropology
              Chabot College
              25555 Hesperian Blvd.
              Hayward, CA 94545

              mailto:kwaldo%40chabotcollege.edu
              voice 510.723.6980

              >>> Andrew Petto <mailto:ajpetto%40uwm.edu> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
              Here is another one relevant to CCs:
              http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx

              My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past, the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always done, but with a new technology.

              There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I will keep looking.

              Here is another example:
              http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion

              How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to learning?

              Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end, and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not; and I was not likely to be.

              Anj

              On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
              >
              > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
              > Nature.
              >
              > Online learning: Campus 2.0
              >
              > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >

              --

              Andrew J Petto, PhD
              Senior Lecturer
              Department of Biological Sciences
              University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
              PO Box 413
              Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
              CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
              Telephone: 414-229-6784
              FAX: 414-229-3926
              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

              Could you be a teacher?
              <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>

              *************
              Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
              *************

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Amanda
              Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California.
              Message 6 of 19 , Mar 20 2:51 PM
              • 0 Attachment
                Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California. As required by Senate Bill 1440, passed a few years ago, a better transition was needed between CSU and CCs...so, CCs devised a plan to create these transfer degrees, in partnership with the CSUs. Each committee had members from the discipline: 3 CC reps and 3 CSU reps, and was chaired by a CC faculty member. We also had an articulation office from the CC on our committee. Working together, we tried to come up with a degree that would meet all parties needs. The limitation, was that a majority of the courses included in the degree needed to be articulated into major prep at the CSU. In CA (and I'm sure in other states as well), the 3 core classes are usually what is all that is required at the lower division level. We were able to add electives from Anthro to the discipline, along with a few other things. These degrees are supposed to guarantee a student admission to a CSU (not necessarily their choice CSU, but a CSU). While it is not perfect, we did have to comply with the law, and I personally feel better that we had some say in this, rather than being told how this law would be implemented.

                Amanda

                P.S. BTW- Hi! That was my first post on here! What a way to jump in, eh? :-)

                --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Anthropmor <anthropmor@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered
                >
                > this is going on in Illinois, as well
                > Mike Pavlik
                >
                >
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Philip Stein <stein39@...>
                > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
                > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.
                >
                > No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!
                >
                > I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.
                >
                > Phil
                >
                > --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...> wrote:
                >
                > From: Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...>
                > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                > Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM
                >
                >
                >
                > What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.
                >
                > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget crisis will lead to further
                > pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.
                >
                > In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.
                >
                > This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.
                >
                > This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".
                >
                > There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.
                >
                > kip
                >
                > Kip Waldo
                > Dept. of Anthropology
                > Chabot College
                > 25555 Hesperian Blvd.
                > Hayward, CA 94545
                >
                > kwaldo@...
                > voice 510.723.6980
                >
                > >>> Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
                > Here is another one relevant to CCs:
                > http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx
                >
                > My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
                > Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
                > that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
                > the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
                > done, but with a new technology.
                >
                > There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
                > been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
                > lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
                > will keep looking.
                >
                > Here is another example:
                > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion
                >
                > How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
                > learning?
                >
                > Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
                > and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
                > not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
                > like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
                > landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
                > using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
                > the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
                > have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
                > and I was not likely to be.
                >
                > Anj
                >
                > On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
                > >
                > > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
                > > Nature.
                > >
                > > Online learning: Campus 2.0
                > >
                > > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                >
                > --
                >
                > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                > Senior Lecturer
                > Department of Biological Sciences
                > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                > PO Box 413
                > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                > FAX: 414-229-3926
                > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                >
                > Could you be a teacher?
                > <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>
                >
                > *************
                > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                > *************
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Anthropmor
                Welcome Amanda - of course, we prefer having some say - and of course we have to comply with the law...it is just that fear and anger create bad laws, and
                Message 7 of 19 , Mar 20 3:00 PM
                • 0 Attachment
                  Welcome Amanda -
                  of course, we prefer having some say - and of course we have to comply with the law...it is just that fear and anger create bad laws, and there should be some input at multiple points along the way, instead of just dumping a huge edict on someone (like you).
                  I'm sure you did a good job , of what was asked of you - it would have been nice if you got to guide the developing system more earlier in the process.
                  Mike Pavlik



                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Amanda <paskeyA@...>
                  To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 4:51 pm
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Online Learning




                  Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California. As required by Senate Bill 1440, passed a few years ago, a better transition was needed between CSU and CCs...so, CCs devised a plan to create these transfer degrees, in partnership with the CSUs. Each committee had members from the discipline: 3 CC reps and 3 CSU reps, and was chaired by a CC faculty member. We also had an articulation office from the CC on our committee. Working together, we tried to come up with a degree that would meet all parties needs. The limitation, was that a majority of the courses included in the degree needed to be articulated into major prep at the CSU. In CA (and I'm sure in other states as well), the 3 core classes are usually what is all that is required at the lower division level. We were able to add electives from Anthro to the discipline, along with a few other things. Th ese degrees are supposed to guarantee a student admission to a CSU (not necessarily their choice CSU, but a CSU). While it is not perfect, we did have to comply with the law, and I personally feel better that we had some say in this, rather than being told how this law would be implemented.

                  Amanda

                  P.S. BTW- Hi! That was my first post on here! What a way to jump in, eh? :-)

                  --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Anthropmor <anthropmor@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered
                  >
                  > this is going on in Illinois, as well
                  > Mike Pavlik
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: Philip Stein <stein39@...>
                  > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                  > Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
                  > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.
                  >
                  > No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!
                  >
                  > I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.
                  >
                  > Phil
                  >
                  > --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > From: Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...>
                  > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                  > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  > Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.
                  >
                  > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget cris is will lead to further
                  > pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.
                  >
                  > In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.
                  >
                  > This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.
                  >
                  > This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".
                  >
                  > There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.
                  >
                  > kip
                  >
                  > Kip Waldo
                  > Dept. of Anthropology
                  > Chabot College
                  > 25555 Hesperian Blvd.
                  > Hayward, CA 94545
                  >
                  > kwaldo@...
                  > voice 510.723.6980
                  >
                  > >>> Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
                  > Here is another one relevant to CCs:
                  > http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx
                  >
                  > My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
                  > Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
                  > that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
                  > the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
                  > done, but with a new technology.
                  >
                  > There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
                  > been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
                  > lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
                  > will keep looking.
                  >
                  > Here is another example:
                  > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion
                  >
                  > How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
                  > learning?
                  >
                  > Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
                  > and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
                  > not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
                  > like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
                  > landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
                  > using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
                  > the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
                  > have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
                  > and I was not likely to be.
                  >
                  > Anj
                  >
                  > On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
                  > >
                  > > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
                  > > Nature.
                  > >
                  > > Online learning: Campus 2.0
                  > >
                  > > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > --
                  >
                  > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                  > Senior Lecturer
                  > Department of Biological Sciences
                  > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                  > PO Box 413
                  > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                  > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                  > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                  > FAX: 414-229-3926
                  > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                  >
                  > Could you be a teacher?
                  > <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>
                  >
                  > *************
                  > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                  > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                  > *************
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >







                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Laura Gonzalez
                  If I m not mistaken, Amanda, you and your colleagues who worked on this transfer curriculum s role was to see what the CSUs already accepted and write the
                  Message 8 of 19 , Mar 20 8:09 PM
                  • 0 Attachment
                    If I'm not mistaken, Amanda, you and your colleagues who worked on this transfer curriculum's role was to see what the CSUs already accepted and write the transfer curriculum to match as best as possible.

                    I looked into this as well, after being contacted by some Linguistic Anthropology faculty who were concerned that there weren't any Ling Anth courses required as part of the transfer degree. The reason for that was that the CSU system either didn't offer Ling Anth or didn't accept it as a transferable course that articulated. It can be used as an elective, but there were only a few courses that could be mandated for transfer.

                    In order for anyone to have gotten in "earlier in the process" we would have had to help develop the CSU degrees.

                    I'm really glad that we had a SACCer work on the transfer curriculum, though. That is a good thing to know.

                    Laura

                    On Mar 20, 2013, at 3:00 PM, Anthropmor wrote:


                    Welcome Amanda -
                    of course, we prefer having some say - and of course we have to comply with the law...it is just that fear and anger create bad laws, and there should be some input at multiple points along the way, instead of just dumping a huge edict on someone (like you).
                    I'm sure you did a good job , of what was asked of you - it would have been nice if you got to guide the developing system more earlier in the process.
                    Mike Pavlik

                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: Amanda <paskeyA@...>
                    To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 4:51 pm
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Online Learning

                    Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California. As required by Senate Bill 1440, passed a few years ago, a better transition was needed between CSU and CCs...so, CCs devised a plan to create these transfer degrees, in partnership with the CSUs. Each committee had members from the discipline: 3 CC reps and 3 CSU reps, and was chaired by a CC faculty member. We also had an articulation office from the CC on our committee. Working together, we tried to come up with a degree that would meet all parties needs. The limitation, was that a majority of the courses included in the degree needed to be articulated into major prep at the CSU. In CA (and I'm sure in other states as well), the 3 core classes are usually what is all that is required at the lower division level. We were able to add electives from Anthro to the discipline, along with a few other things. Th ese degrees are supposed to guarantee a student admission to a CSU (not necessarily their choice CSU, but a CSU). While it is not perfect, we did have to comply with the law, and I personally feel better that we had some say in this, rather than being told how this law would be implemented.

                    Amanda

                    P.S. BTW- Hi! That was my first post on here! What a way to jump in, eh? :-)

                    --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Anthropmor <anthropmor@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered
                    >
                    > this is going on in Illinois, as well
                    > Mike Pavlik
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > -----Original Message-----
                    > From: Philip Stein <stein39@...>
                    > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                    > Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
                    > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.
                    >
                    > No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!
                    >
                    > I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.
                    >
                    > Phil
                    >
                    > --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > From: Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...>
                    > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                    > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    > Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.
                    >
                    > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget cris is will lead to further
                    > pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.
                    >
                    > In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.
                    >
                    > This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.
                    >
                    > This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".
                    >
                    > There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.
                    >
                    > kip
                    >
                    > Kip Waldo
                    > Dept. of Anthropology
                    > Chabot College
                    > 25555 Hesperian Blvd.
                    > Hayward, CA 94545
                    >
                    > kwaldo@...
                    > voice 510.723.6980
                    >
                    > >>> Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
                    > Here is another one relevant to CCs:
                    > http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx
                    >
                    > My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
                    > Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
                    > that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
                    > the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
                    > done, but with a new technology.
                    >
                    > There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
                    > been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
                    > lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
                    > will keep looking.
                    >
                    > Here is another example:
                    > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion
                    >
                    > How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
                    > learning?
                    >
                    > Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
                    > and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
                    > not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
                    > like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
                    > landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
                    > using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
                    > the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
                    > have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
                    > and I was not likely to be.
                    >
                    > Anj
                    >
                    > On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
                    > > Nature.
                    > >
                    > > Online learning: Campus 2.0
                    > >
                    > > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    > >
                    >
                    > --
                    >
                    > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                    > Senior Lecturer
                    > Department of Biological Sciences
                    > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                    > PO Box 413
                    > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                    > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                    > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                    > FAX: 414-229-3926
                    > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                    >
                    > Could you be a teacher?
                    > <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>
                    >
                    > *************
                    > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                    > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                    > *************
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Lynch, Brian M
                    I am writing this from the midst of a sabbatical, and while on a visit to the office of a colleague in Minnesota with whom I have had a 10-year dialogue on
                    Message 9 of 19 , Mar 21 9:57 AM
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I am writing this from the midst of a sabbatical, and while on a visit to the office of a colleague in Minnesota with whom I have had a 10-year dialogue on learning outcomes assessment. I believe it was at an SACC annual conference in 2006 (Savannah) where I gave a session on learning assessment-- which has been a key focus for my work as full-time faculty, faculty-development coordinator, and learning-assessment catalyst for nearly 20 years. I remember clearly the very mixed reception I got at an otherwise very collegial gathering, as I engaged colleagues in Savannah in discussion about something very anthropological-- learning how to pay attention to, and gather evidence within groups of people to understand them better in their lives: in this case the "groups" would be students-faculty. Over the intervening years I have worked with colleagues on learning assessment, with the notion that there is great ongoing value in learning effective ways to observe the behavior of such groups, not to just see them in their "ethnographic present," nor as static collections of individuals, nor as people who produce static collections of artifacts (in this case, papers, projects, presentations, surveys, artwork, video presentations etc.) , but to try and understand them in their 'subjectivity,' in relation to their networks, their choices, the development of their abilities, their goals.... Not to 'fetishize' or 'commodify" their productions, but to understand them in a more dynamic way as reflections of value, of attainment, of "currency."

                      My approach is to understand the teaching/learning endeavor as, in the framing that Freire, an inter-subjective engagement, calling for inter-subjective reflection; learning assessment that respects this inter-subjectivity can, in his terms, be liberating.

                      Our states now seem to be on an accelerating track to put things in place that define 1)learning outcomes and 2)learning assessment, in some type of clear terms... To the examples cited already in this thread you can and the State of Connecticut, and its Transfer and Articulation Program which has recently been set up to define a framework of learning standards and expected learning outcomes, within which transfer and articulation between institutions would be defined. Add to this picture the news in the past 48 hours or so that officials at the Federal level are now encouraging institutions to begin thinking about programs (degrees) as defined by expected learning outcomes rather than by the magic "credit hour." Here we go!

                      Back in 2006 I was saying to my SACC colleagues that now is the time for us as faculty, with a concern for teaching and learning, to own what would be the best of approaches to learning assessment (and we as anthropologists could give some interesting examples, as professionals who claim the identity of holistic participant observers-- in the cultural field-- or the contexualizers of artifacts --in the physical/archaeological fields.) If we still have a window of opportunity to take at this point, it may be quickly passing. Principled resistance in the name of "teaching and learning" might be personally satisfying, but now seems even more likely to result in self-fulfilling prophecy about the imposition of reductive, unacceptable standards and practices by outside authorities. The federal government is stepping increasingly into the picture of accreditation, as felt by and expressed by our regional accrediting bodies. Competition from both accredited and non-accredited private (for profit) institutions who claim to "do a better job of assessment" further push us in challenging directions.

                      Among other things, it seems to me that our national associations (SACC included) could play an important role in addressing this situation, by addressing standards of learning related to our discipline (and in dialogue with related disciplines), sharing widely and quite publicly examples of effective uses of learning assessment.... and more. The hoof beats on the horizon that I mentioned to colleagues in Savannah in 2006 are now thundering-- and the breath of the stampede can be felt on our backs. Where do we go with this?

                      Brian

                      ________________________________________
                      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] on behalf of Laura Gonzalez [ltgonzalez@...]
                      Sent: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 11:09 PM
                      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Online Learning

                      If I'm not mistaken, Amanda, you and your colleagues who worked on this transfer curriculum's role was to see what the CSUs already accepted and write the transfer curriculum to match as best as possible.

                      I looked into this as well, after being contacted by some Linguistic Anthropology faculty who were concerned that there weren't any Ling Anth courses required as part of the transfer degree. The reason for that was that the CSU system either didn't offer Ling Anth or didn't accept it as a transferable course that articulated. It can be used as an elective, but there were only a few courses that could be mandated for transfer.

                      In order for anyone to have gotten in "earlier in the process" we would have had to help develop the CSU degrees.

                      I'm really glad that we had a SACCer work on the transfer curriculum, though. That is a good thing to know.

                      Laura

                      On Mar 20, 2013, at 3:00 PM, Anthropmor wrote:


                      Welcome Amanda -
                      of course, we prefer having some say - and of course we have to comply with the law...it is just that fear and anger create bad laws, and there should be some input at multiple points along the way, instead of just dumping a huge edict on someone (like you).
                      I'm sure you did a good job , of what was asked of you - it would have been nice if you got to guide the developing system more earlier in the process.
                      Mike Pavlik

                      -----Original Message-----
                      From: Amanda <paskeyA@...>
                      To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 4:51 pm
                      Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Online Learning

                      Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California. As required by Senate Bill 1440, passed a few years ago, a better transition was needed between CSU and CCs...so, CCs devised a plan to create these transfer degrees, in partnership with the CSUs. Each committee had members from the discipline: 3 CC reps and 3 CSU reps, and was chaired by a CC faculty member. We also had an articulation office from the CC on our committee. Working together, we tried to come up with a degree that would meet all parties needs. The limitation, was that a majority of the courses included in the degree needed to be articulated into major prep at the CSU. In CA (and I'm sure in other states as well), the 3 core classes are usually what is all that is required at the lower division level. We were able to add electives from Anthro to the discipline, along with a few other things. Th ese degrees are supposed to guarantee a student admission to a CSU (not necessarily their choice CSU, but a CSU). While it is not perfect, we did have to comply with the law, and I personally feel better that we had some say in this, rather than being told how this law would be implemented.

                      Amanda

                      P.S. BTW- Hi! That was my first post on here! What a way to jump in, eh? :-)

                      --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Anthropmor <anthropmor@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered
                      >
                      > this is going on in Illinois, as well
                      > Mike Pavlik
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > -----Original Message-----
                      > From: Philip Stein <stein39@...>
                      > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
                      > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.
                      >
                      > No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!
                      >
                      > I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.
                      >
                      > Phil
                      >
                      > --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > From: Kip Waldo <kwaldo@...>
                      > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                      > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      > Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.
                      >
                      > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget cris is will lead to further
                      > pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.
                      >
                      > In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.
                      >
                      > This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.
                      >
                      > This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".
                      >
                      > There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.
                      >
                      > kip
                      >
                      > Kip Waldo
                      > Dept. of Anthropology
                      > Chabot College
                      > 25555 Hesperian Blvd.
                      > Hayward, CA 94545
                      >
                      > kwaldo@...
                      > voice 510.723.6980
                      >
                      > >>> Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
                      > Here is another one relevant to CCs:
                      > http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx
                      >
                      > My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
                      > Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
                      > that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
                      > the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
                      > done, but with a new technology.
                      >
                      > There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
                      > been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
                      > lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
                      > will keep looking.
                      >
                      > Here is another example:
                      > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion
                      >
                      > How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
                      > learning?
                      >
                      > Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
                      > and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
                      > not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
                      > like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
                      > landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
                      > using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
                      > the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
                      > have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
                      > and I was not likely to be.
                      >
                      > Anj
                      >
                      > On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
                      > > Nature.
                      > >
                      > > Online learning: Campus 2.0
                      > >
                      > > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
                      > >
                      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                      > --
                      >
                      > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                      > Senior Lecturer
                      > Department of Biological Sciences
                      > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                      > PO Box 413
                      > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                      > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                      > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                      > FAX: 414-229-3926
                      > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                      >
                      > Could you be a teacher?
                      > <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>
                      >
                      > *************
                      > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                      > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                      > *************
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                      ------------------------------------

                      Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
                    • Amanda
                      Yes, we were a bit constrained by what the CSUs already offer-- and as we all know, there is little agreement among the CSU Anthro folks about what should
                      Message 10 of 19 , Mar 22 10:18 AM
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Yes, we were a bit constrained by what the CSUs already offer-- and as we all know, there is little agreement among the CSU Anthro folks about what should included in a degree! Linguistics is a required component of the major at 2 CSUs I believe, including my local CSU (Sacramento). I do believe that the intention of the senate bill was to get both groups, CC and CSU to think about their degree requirements, but so far, it seems like we are the only ones doing that.
                        Amanda


                        --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Laura Gonzalez <ltgonzalez@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > If I'm not mistaken, Amanda, you and your colleagues who worked on this transfer curriculum's role was to see what the CSUs already accepted and write the transfer curriculum to match as best as possible.
                        >
                        > I looked into this as well, after being contacted by some Linguistic Anthropology faculty who were concerned that there weren't any Ling Anth courses required as part of the transfer degree. The reason for that was that the CSU system either didn't offer Ling Anth or didn't accept it as a transferable course that articulated. It can be used as an elective, but there were only a few courses that could be mandated for transfer.
                        >
                        > In order for anyone to have gotten in "earlier in the process" we would have had to help develop the CSU degrees.
                        >
                        > I'm really glad that we had a SACCer work on the transfer curriculum, though. That is a good thing to know.
                        >
                        > Laura
                        >
                        > On Mar 20, 2013, at 3:00 PM, Anthropmor wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Welcome Amanda -
                        > of course, we prefer having some say - and of course we have to comply with the law...it is just that fear and anger create bad laws, and there should be some input at multiple points along the way, instead of just dumping a huge edict on someone (like you).
                        > I'm sure you did a good job , of what was asked of you - it would have been nice if you got to guide the developing system more earlier in the process.
                        > Mike Pavlik
                        >
                        > -----Original Message-----
                        > From: Amanda <paskeyA@...>
                        > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Wed, Mar 20, 2013 4:51 pm
                        > Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Online Learning
                        >
                        > Just to add more information on the plan alluded to below....I am a part of the group that created the AA-T (AA for transfer) for Anthropology in California. As required by Senate Bill 1440, passed a few years ago, a better transition was needed between CSU and CCs...so, CCs devised a plan to create these transfer degrees, in partnership with the CSUs. Each committee had members from the discipline: 3 CC reps and 3 CSU reps, and was chaired by a CC faculty member. We also had an articulation office from the CC on our committee. Working together, we tried to come up with a degree that would meet all parties needs. The limitation, was that a majority of the courses included in the degree needed to be articulated into major prep at the CSU. In CA (and I'm sure in other states as well), the 3 core classes are usually what is all that is required at the lower division level. We were able to add electives from Anthro to the discipline, along with a few other things. Th ese degrees are supposed to guarantee a student admission to a CSU (not necessarily their choice CSU, but a CSU). While it is not perfect, we did have to comply with the law, and I personally feel better that we had some say in this, rather than being told how this law would be implemented.
                        >
                        > Amanda
                        >
                        > P.S. BTW- Hi! That was my first post on here! What a way to jump in, eh? :-)
                        >
                        > --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, Anthropmor <anthropmor@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered
                        > >
                        > > this is going on in Illinois, as well
                        > > Mike Pavlik
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > -----Original Message-----
                        > > From: Philip Stein <stein39@>
                        > > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                        > > Sent: Sun, Mar 17, 2013 9:34 pm
                        > > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Right on! I have always considered objectives and outcomes in my teaching, but it was a personal thing between and my students. My objection to SLOs--and I have stated this on numerous occasions--is that it will lead to course standardization.
                        > >
                        > > No one has responded to my posting of the information on the California plan to provide free and/or inexpensive textbooks for college students. Again this sounds quite reasonable until you start to think about it. Publishers are going to do whatever they can to get their textbook selected to be the free college textbook for the course in California, be it a newly written text or rehabilitation of a poorly selling or out-of-date "classic" text. Try to select a $120 textbook for your class when your colleague selects the "free" online state text. Talk about course standardization!!!
                        > >
                        > > I truely hope that some time can be set aside in Austin to discuss these matters and that SACC can take a formal position on these issues and attempt (good luck!) to get the AAA to weigh in.
                        > >
                        > > Phil
                        > >
                        > > --- On Sun, 3/17/13, Kip Waldo <kwaldo@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > From: Kip Waldo <kwaldo@>
                        > > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Online Learning
                        > > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                        > > Date: Sunday, March 17, 2013, 7:20 PM
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > What is happening in California is a full-on assault on the community colleges. Amidst the enormous budget cuts we have faces, he accreditation process is putting schools on warning for not meeting to this and that requirement. Accreditation has been used to force through Washington's "evaluation process" - SLOs etc. The accrediting agency has, thus far, been able to over-ride collective bargaining agreements or force them through, adding hours of meaningless work to faculty across the campus. This has created a "heads-down" atmosphere in many schools, where people are absorbed in this paperwork and positioning themselves to get a few crumbs, if they are available.
                        > >
                        > > In addition a "Student Success" plan has been pushed through - with a focus on "core classes" that guarantees a transfer to the California State University system. What this has accomplished is the elimination of a broader range of classes from being offered. In anthro we are "encouraged" to offer just the Intros - no area specializations or classes on globalization etc. Since the proposed transfer curriculum has to go through a special adoption and approval process, the system is clogged with new proposals. So guess what was one of the disciplines that slid to the bottom of the stack at my school - it won't be considered this year? Hint, it begins with "A". And who needs it after all? We have sociology and it is so much more popular than Anthro, except Biological Anthro which transfers as a science and we have a lab. So, it fills in for the highly impacted biology classes. My concern is that this perfect storm of a budget cris is will lead to further
                        > > pruning and ultimately elimination of programs. We have always faced the problem of people coming out of high school knowing nothing about anthropology, especially cultural anthropology. Once some of them "discover" it, they plunge in and take everything. Now "everything" will be 3 classes.
                        > >
                        > > In addition, a number of us have been warning that is approach will lead to standardization and finally exit exams. And then a centralization or even a privatization could take place. Paranoid? Only if one isn't paying attention. There is a huge push from the Gates and Lumina foundations. And that is where online learning comes in. Textbook manufacturers have their capsules ready for faculty to load for online classes. A benign time saver? Well, recently along with the great concern for student success (which NEVER involves adequate funding) a bill has been introduced to allow "approved" for profit agencies to offer online classes to students who are unable to register for classes they need. So, the door is opening. It may not pass, but the camel's nose is under the proverbial tent.
                        > >
                        > > This is in addition to an approved measure to deny financial aid to students who have taken to many units, been around too long etc. Not only will students who fit this criteria not get financial aid, they will have to pay more per unit.
                        > >
                        > > This should be discussed in every venue possible. If they can crack the California system, many will follow. I am not a supporter of privatization of any public services. I have yet to see any positive results, other than from those who profit. And one of the few resources available to working class people is being destroyed, in the name of "efficiency".
                        > >
                        > > There has been quite a bit written about this and I do think it should be discussed throughout the AAA.
                        > >
                        > > kip
                        > >
                        > > Kip Waldo
                        > > Dept. of Anthropology
                        > > Chabot College
                        > > 25555 Hesperian Blvd.
                        > > Hayward, CA 94545
                        > >
                        > > kwaldo@
                        > > voice 510.723.6980
                        > >
                        > > >>> Andrew Petto <ajpetto@> 03/17/13 1:26 PM >>>
                        > > Here is another one relevant to CCs:
                        > > http://campustechnology.com/articles/2012/12/03/community-colleges-try-moocs-in-blended-courses.aspx
                        > >
                        > > My thoughts on this---from a school that is, like the example from
                        > > Maryland, jumping in mostly in order to have a place at the table---is
                        > > that, like so many other educational forays into technology in the past,
                        > > the first step is always to try to do the same thing that we have always
                        > > done, but with a new technology.
                        > >
                        > > There are a few places being innovative about it. Wellesley College has
                        > > been thinking seriously about doing something other than just putting
                        > > lectures on line. Can't find the article that I read about it, but I
                        > > will keep looking.
                        > >
                        > > Here is another example:
                        > > http://www.nytimes.com/2013/03/17/sunday-review/reading-writing-and-video-games.html?ref=opinion
                        > >
                        > > How many of your campuses have jumped on using gaming as an adjunct to
                        > > learning?
                        > >
                        > > Ours did; I experimented with it, but in the end, the input on my end,
                        > > and the time commitment from students to get through the activities were
                        > > not worth the learning outcomes. For example, in Second Life, it seemed
                        > > like 75% of the students' time was spent "walking" across the virtual
                        > > landscape to "visit" virtual labs and reference resources. Even when
                        > > using the flying option, the journey took up more than the engagement of
                        > > the materials. If I had been a more competent designer, perhaps, I could
                        > > have integrate the learning better into the "journey" ... but I was not;
                        > > and I was not likely to be.
                        > >
                        > > Anj
                        > >
                        > > On 2013-03-17 12:43, Philip Stein wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Here is a very interesting article on MOOCs from the latest issue of
                        > > > Nature.
                        > > >
                        > > > Online learning: Campus 2.0
                        > > >
                        > > > http://www.nature.com/news/online-learning-campus-2-0-1.12590
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > > --
                        > >
                        > > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                        > > Senior Lecturer
                        > > Department of Biological Sciences
                        > > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                        > > PO Box 413
                        > > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                        > > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                        > > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                        > > FAX: 414-229-3926
                        > > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                        > >
                        > > Could you be a teacher?
                        > > <https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/Be_a_teacher.mp3>
                        > >
                        > > *************
                        > > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                        > > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                        > > *************
                        > >
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                        > >
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                        > >
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