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Re: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC

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  • Anthropmor
    I wonder if part f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old otions of anthropology as only study the exotic tribal
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 24, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I wonder if part
      f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
      otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
      ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
      reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
      here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
      o much bigger in CCs than anthropology


      Anthropology not advertising itself is without a doubt true; the movement to the periphery of the discipline is w/o a doubt also part of it; there is also a horrifying lack of support within the discipline- people have to want to build departments, have students exploring a series of classes....
      Mike Pavlik



      -----Original Message-----
      From: Conal Ho <conalho@...>
      To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 12:48 pm
      Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC


      Thanks to everyone who replied. I know that in California community colleges,
      hey have something like a course equivalency process whereby someone can
      emonstrate through say their own research that they have done enough to be
      redentialed to teach particular classes. For instance, a friend of my who also
      as a PhD in anthropology teachers in the intercultural studies department at a
      alifornia community college and she was able to do that by showing her
      ualifying exams and PhD research which was on race and ethnicity relations. I
      onder if something like course equivalencies are available in North Carolina.
      It's a shame that anthropology does not attract more students, at least in the
      egion of North Carolina where I'm at (Raleigh-Durham). Anthropology programs in
      C's in San Francisco Bay area seem to be quite a bit bigger. I wonder if part
      f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
      otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
      ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
      reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
      here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
      o much bigger in CCs than anthropology.
      Regarding Dianne Chidester's comment:
      Also, I have found that teaching the sociology courses is really done
      from a less holistic view and the focus really is on using the
      theoretical perspectives. There is some crossover, but that is limited.
      I think this can really go both ways. There are so many ways to teach
      nthropology and the tension between the more humanistic and scientific
      erspectives can be generative and fruitful.
      Who in the community college leadership do I turn to to ask for how faculty
      ualifications for a course are done? And how do I find out if there is wiggle
      oom? From reading the accrediting agency (SACS) website, having 18 graduate
      ours of coursework isn't only the way to be credentialled:
      from SACS FAQ page: http://www.sacscoc.org/FAQsanswers.asp#q14
      Institutions are required to document and justify that each faculty member is
      ualified to teach assigned courses. Documentation and justification may be
      ccomplished by using only traditional academic credentials, by using a
      ombination of traditional academic credentials and “other” qualifications, or
      y using only “other” qualifications consistent with Comprehensive Standard
      .7.1, and reporting these on the Commission’s faculty roster form. In essence,
      he institution is called upon to “make its case” for why the faculty member is
      ualified to teach courses assigned.

      If the traditional academic credential approach is used, then following the
      aculty Credential guidelines will prove very helpful. When the qualifying
      redential aligns with the courses being taught, no justification is normally
      equired as the credential speaks for itself, e.g. Ph.D. in English teaching
      nglish. However, if the Ph.D. is in Business Administration and the faculty
      ember is teaching Accounting, then a written justification is normally
      ecessary.

      If a combination of traditional credentials and “other” credentials is used,
      r if the “other” qualifications only approach is used, then a portfolio
      pproach for qualifications is suggested. This approach normally requires a
      areful and thorough justification that demonstrates the linkage between the
      arious components of the portfolio of qualifications to the courses being
      aught.
      Thanks for the guidance!
      Conal Ho
      ------------------------------------
      Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
      Individual Email | Traditional
      http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Lloyd Miller
      Perhaps this month s Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising for us. It has a fascinating article titled Anthropology, Inc. that describes
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 24, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        Perhaps this month's Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising for us. It has a fascinating article titled "Anthropology, Inc." that describes how companies are contracting with anthropologists and those with anthropological training to employ the ethnographic techniques of participant observation and interviewing to reveal consumers' "deepest needs, fears and desires." It probably won't please the hard-core academics, but it describes contract ethnography as a growing and apparently quite lucrative business. It also addresses ethical matters.
        Lloyd


        On Feb 24, 2013, at 8:24 AM, Anthropmor wrote:

        >
        >
        > I wonder if part
        > f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
        > otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
        > ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
        > reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
        > here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
        > o much bigger in CCs than anthropology
        >
        > Anthropology not advertising itself is without a doubt true; the movement to the periphery of the discipline is w/o a doubt also part of it; there is also a horrifying lack of support within the discipline- people have to want to build departments, have students exploring a series of classes....
        > Mike Pavlik
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Conal Ho conalho@...>
        > To: SACC-L SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
        > Sent: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 12:48 pm
        > Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC
        >
        > Thanks to everyone who replied. I know that in California community colleges,
        > hey have something like a course equivalency process whereby someone can
        > emonstrate through say their own research that they have done enough to be
        > redentialed to teach particular classes. For instance, a friend of my who also
        > as a PhD in anthropology teachers in the intercultural studies department at a
        > alifornia community college and she was able to do that by showing her
        > ualifying exams and PhD research which was on race and ethnicity relations. I
        > onder if something like course equivalencies are available in North Carolina.
        > It's a shame that anthropology does not attract more students, at least in the
        > egion of North Carolina where I'm at (Raleigh-Durham). Anthropology programs in
        > C's in San Francisco Bay area seem to be quite a bit bigger. I wonder if part
        > f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
        > otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
        > ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
        > reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
        > here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
        > o much bigger in CCs than anthropology.
        > Regarding Dianne Chidester's comment:
        > Also, I have found that teaching the sociology courses is really done
        > from a less holistic view and the focus really is on using the
        > theoretical perspectives. There is some crossover, but that is limited.
        > I think this can really go both ways. There are so many ways to teach
        > nthropology and the tension between the more humanistic and scientific
        > erspectives can be generative and fruitful.
        > Who in the community college leadership do I turn to to ask for how faculty
        > ualifications for a course are done? And how do I find out if there is wiggle
        > oom? From reading the accrediting agency (SACS) website, having 18 graduate
        > ours of coursework isn't only the way to be credentialled:
        > from SACS FAQ page: http://www.sacscoc.org/FAQsanswers.asp#q14
        > Institutions are required to document and justify that each faculty member is
        > ualified to teach assigned courses. Documentation and justification may be
        > ccomplished by using only traditional academic credentials, by using a
        > ombination of traditional academic credentials and �other� qualifications, or
        > y using only �other� qualifications consistent with Comprehensive Standard
        > .7.1, and reporting these on the Commission�s faculty roster form. In essence,
        > he institution is called upon to �make its case� for why the faculty member is
        > ualified to teach courses assigned.
        >
        > If the traditional academic credential approach is used, then following the
        > aculty Credential guidelines will prove very helpful. When the qualifying
        > redential aligns with the courses being taught, no justification is normally
        > equired as the credential speaks for itself, e.g. Ph.D. in English teaching
        > nglish. However, if the Ph.D. is in Business Administration and the faculty
        > ember is teaching Accounting, then a written justification is normally
        > ecessary.
        >
        > If a combination of traditional credentials and �other� credentials is used,
        > r if the �other� qualifications only approach is used, then a portfolio
        > pproach for qualifications is suggested. This approach normally requires a
        > areful and thorough justification that demonstrates the linkage between the
        > arious components of the portfolio of qualifications to the courses being
        > aught.
        > Thanks for the guidance!
        > Conal Ho
        > ------------------------------------
        > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
        > Individual Email | Traditional
        > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anthropmor
        That is good news, but those of us who favor the 4 field approach always have to deal with partisan bickering - we ALL have to support this, and CRM and
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 24, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          That is good news, but those of us who favor the 4 field approach always have to deal with partisan bickering - we ALL have to support this, and CRM and Language institutes and human biology...as I know you all ready know, sir.
          Mike Pavlik


          Perhaps this month's Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising
          or us. It has a fascinating article titled "Anthropology, Inc." that describes
          ow companies are contracting with anthropologists and those with
          nthropological training to employ the ethnographic





          -----Original Message-----
          From: Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...>
          To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 11:41 am
          Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC: Anthropology, Inc.


          Perhaps this month's Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising
          or us. It has a fascinating article titled "Anthropology, Inc." that describes
          ow companies are contracting with anthropologists and those with
          nthropological training to employ the ethnographic techniques of participant
          bservation and interviewing to reveal consumers' "deepest needs, fears and
          esires." It probably won't please the hard-core academics, but it describes
          ontract ethnography as a growing and apparently quite lucrative business. It
          lso addresses ethical matters.
          loyd

          n Feb 24, 2013, at 8:24 AM, Anthropmor wrote:
          >

          I wonder if part
          f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps
          ld
          otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
          ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
          reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
          > here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
          o much bigger in CCs than anthropology

          Anthropology not advertising itself is without a doubt true; the movement to
          he periphery of the discipline is w/o a doubt also part of it; there is also a
          orrifying lack of support within the discipline- people have to want to build
          epartments, have students exploring a series of classes....
          Mike Pavlik

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Conal Ho conalho@...>
          To: SACC-L SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 12:48 pm
          Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC

          Thanks to everyone who replied. I know that in California community colleges,
          hey have something like a course equivalency process whereby someone can
          emonstrate through say their own research that they have done enough to be
          redentialed to teach particular classes. For instance, a friend of my who also
          > as a PhD in anthropology teachers in the intercultural studies department at a
          > alifornia community college and she was able to do that by showing her
          ualifying exams and PhD research which was on race and ethnicity relations. I
          onder if something like course equivalencies are available in North Carolina.
          It's a shame that anthropology does not attract more students, at least in the
          > egion of North Carolina where I'm at (Raleigh-Durham). Anthropology programs
          n
          C's in San Francisco Bay area seem to be quite a bit bigger. I wonder if part
          f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps
          ld
          otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
          ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
          reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
          > here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
          o much bigger in CCs than anthropology.
          Regarding Dianne Chidester's comment:
          Also, I have found that teaching the sociology courses is really done
          from a less holistic view and the focus really is on using the
          theoretical perspectives. There is some crossover, but that is limited.
          I think this can really go both ways. There are so many ways to teach
          nthropology and the tension between the more humanistic and scientific
          erspectives can be generative and fruitful.
          Who in the community college leadership do I turn to to ask for how faculty
          ualifications for a course are done? And how do I find out if there is wiggle
          oom? From reading the accrediting agency (SACS) website, having 18 graduate
          ours of coursework isn't only the way to be credentialled:
          from SACS FAQ page: http://www.sacscoc.org/FAQsanswers.asp#q14
          Institutions are required to document and justify that each faculty member is
          ualified to teach assigned courses. Documentation and justification may be
          ccomplished by using only traditional academic credentials, by using a
          ombination of traditional academic credentials and �other� qualifications, or
          y using only �other� qualifications consistent with Comprehensive Standard
          .7.1, and reporting these on the Commission�s faculty roster form. In essence,
          > he institution is called upon to �make its case� for why the faculty member is
          > ualified to teach courses assigned.

          If the traditional academic credential approach is used, then following the
          aculty Credential guidelines will prove very helpful. When the qualifying
          redential aligns with the courses being taught, no justification is normally
          equired as the credential speaks for itself, e.g. Ph.D. in English teaching
          nglish. However, if the Ph.D. is in Business Administration and the faculty
          ember is teaching Accounting, then a written justification is normally
          ecessary.

          If a combination of traditional credentials and �other� credentials is used,
          r if the �other� qualifications only approach is used, then a portfolio
          pproach for qualifications is suggested. This approach normally requires a
          areful and thorough justification that demonstrates the linkage between the
          arious components of the portfolio of qualifications to the courses being
          aught.
          Thanks for the guidance!
          Conal Ho
          ------------------------------------
          Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
          Individual Email | Traditional
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------------------------------
          Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
          Individual Email | Traditional
          http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • kent morris
          To what extent must anthropologists who feel bound to our code of ethics exercise caution when dealing with the business world?
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 24, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            To what extent must anthropologists who feel bound to our code of ethics exercise caution when dealing with the business world?

            On Feb 24, 2013, at 11:00 AM, Anthropmor wrote:

            >
            > That is good news, but those of us who favor the 4 field approach always have to deal with partisan bickering - we ALL have to support this, and CRM and Language institutes and human biology...as I know you all ready know, sir.
            > Mike Pavlik
            >
            >
            > Perhaps this month's Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising
            > or us. It has a fascinating article titled "Anthropology, Inc." that describes
            > ow companies are contracting with anthropologists and those with
            > nthropological training to employ the ethnographic
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...>
            > To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Sun, Feb 24, 2013 11:41 am
            > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC: Anthropology, Inc.
            >
            >
            > Perhaps this month's Atlantic magazine (March 2013) is doing some advertising
            > or us. It has a fascinating article titled "Anthropology, Inc." that describes
            > ow companies are contracting with anthropologists and those with
            > nthropological training to employ the ethnographic techniques of participant
            > bservation and interviewing to reveal consumers' "deepest needs, fears and
            > esires." It probably won't please the hard-core academics, but it describes
            > ontract ethnography as a growing and apparently quite lucrative business. It
            > lso addresses ethical matters.
            > loyd
            >
            > n Feb 24, 2013, at 8:24 AM, Anthropmor wrote:
            >>
            >
            > I wonder if part
            > f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps
            > ld
            > otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
            > ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
            > reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
            >> here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
            > o much bigger in CCs than anthropology
            >
            > Anthropology not advertising itself is without a doubt true; the movement to
            > he periphery of the discipline is w/o a doubt also part of it; there is also a
            > orrifying lack of support within the discipline- people have to want to build
            > epartments, have students exploring a series of classes....
            > Mike Pavlik
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Conal Ho conalho@...>
            > To: SACC-L SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 12:48 pm
            > Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC
            >
            > Thanks to everyone who replied. I know that in California community colleges,
            > hey have something like a course equivalency process whereby someone can
            > emonstrate through say their own research that they have done enough to be
            > redentialed to teach particular classes. For instance, a friend of my who also
            >> as a PhD in anthropology teachers in the intercultural studies department at a
            >> alifornia community college and she was able to do that by showing her
            > ualifying exams and PhD research which was on race and ethnicity relations. I
            > onder if something like course equivalencies are available in North Carolina.
            > It's a shame that anthropology does not attract more students, at least in the
            >> egion of North Carolina where I'm at (Raleigh-Durham). Anthropology programs
            > n
            > C's in San Francisco Bay area seem to be quite a bit bigger. I wonder if part
            > f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps
            > ld
            > otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
            > ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
            > reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
            >> here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
            > o much bigger in CCs than anthropology.
            > Regarding Dianne Chidester's comment:
            > Also, I have found that teaching the sociology courses is really done
            > from a less holistic view and the focus really is on using the
            > theoretical perspectives. There is some crossover, but that is limited.
            > I think this can really go both ways. There are so many ways to teach
            > nthropology and the tension between the more humanistic and scientific
            > erspectives can be generative and fruitful.
            > Who in the community college leadership do I turn to to ask for how faculty
            > ualifications for a course are done? And how do I find out if there is wiggle
            > oom? From reading the accrediting agency (SACS) website, having 18 graduate
            > ours of coursework isn't only the way to be credentialled:
            > from SACS FAQ page: http://www.sacscoc.org/FAQsanswers.asp#q14
            > Institutions are required to document and justify that each faculty member is
            > ualified to teach assigned courses. Documentation and justification may be
            > ccomplished by using only traditional academic credentials, by using a
            > ombination of traditional academic credentials and �other� qualifications, or
            > y using only �other� qualifications consistent with Comprehensive Standard
            > .7.1, and reporting these on the Commission�s faculty roster form. In essence,
            >> he institution is called upon to �make its case� for why the faculty member is
            >> ualified to teach courses assigned.
            >
            > If the traditional academic credential approach is used, then following the
            > aculty Credential guidelines will prove very helpful. When the qualifying
            > redential aligns with the courses being taught, no justification is normally
            > equired as the credential speaks for itself, e.g. Ph.D. in English teaching
            > nglish. However, if the Ph.D. is in Business Administration and the faculty
            > ember is teaching Accounting, then a written justification is normally
            > ecessary.
            >
            > If a combination of traditional credentials and �other� credentials is used,
            > r if the �other� qualifications only approach is used, then a portfolio
            > pproach for qualifications is suggested. This approach normally requires a
            > areful and thorough justification that demonstrates the linkage between the
            > arious components of the portfolio of qualifications to the courses being
            > aught.
            > Thanks for the guidance!
            > Conal Ho
            > ------------------------------------
            > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
            > Individual Email | Traditional
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
            > Individual Email | Traditional
            > http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------
            >
            > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
          • Deborah Shepherd
            In Minnesota CC’s, General Sociology is a required course for Nursing, Criminal Justice, and some other major programs. I am not aware of any program that
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 24, 2013
            • 0 Attachment
              In Minnesota CC’s, General Sociology is a required course for Nursing, Criminal Justice, and some other major programs. I am not aware of any program that gives similar credit for taking Cultural Anthropology (our many campuses rarely if ever taught a single 4-field course). The State does seem to require that students wishing to get licensed to teach K-12 needed a Cultural Anthro course (at least that’s why my online CA courses were filled with off-campus students), but that is not much compared to the traffic heading over to General Sociology due to graduation requirements.



              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Anthropmor
              Sent: Sunday, February 24, 2013 8:25 AM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC







              I wonder if part
              f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
              otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
              ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
              reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
              here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
              o much bigger in CCs than anthropology

              Anthropology not advertising itself is without a doubt true; the movement to the periphery of the discipline is w/o a doubt also part of it; there is also a horrifying lack of support within the discipline- people have to want to build departments, have students exploring a series of classes....
              Mike Pavlik

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Conal Ho conalho@... <mailto:conalho%40gmail.com> >
              To: SACC-L SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> >
              Sent: Sat, Feb 23, 2013 12:48 pm
              Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Teaching Sociology in North Carolina CC

              Thanks to everyone who replied. I know that in California community colleges,
              hey have something like a course equivalency process whereby someone can
              emonstrate through say their own research that they have done enough to be
              redentialed to teach particular classes. For instance, a friend of my who also
              as a PhD in anthropology teachers in the intercultural studies department at a
              alifornia community college and she was able to do that by showing her
              ualifying exams and PhD research which was on race and ethnicity relations. I
              onder if something like course equivalencies are available in North Carolina.
              It's a shame that anthropology does not attract more students, at least in the
              egion of North Carolina where I'm at (Raleigh-Durham). Anthropology programs in
              C's in San Francisco Bay area seem to be quite a bit bigger. I wonder if part
              f this is anthropology as a discipline not advertising itself well. Perhaps old
              otions of anthropology as only study the "exotic tribal" people still hold? I
              ean, after all, anthropologists for the past 30 years have studied in urban
              reas, deal with social problems, diversity issues, power issues, etc.! I mean,
              here doesn't seem to be any discipline-related reason why sociology should be
              o much bigger in CCs than anthropology.
              Regarding Dianne Chidester's comment:
              Also, I have found that teaching the sociology courses is really done
              from a less holistic view and the focus really is on using the
              theoretical perspectives. There is some crossover, but that is limited.
              I think this can really go both ways. There are so many ways to teach
              nthropology and the tension between the more humanistic and scientific
              erspectives can be generative and fruitful.
              Who in the community college leadership do I turn to to ask for how faculty
              ualifications for a course are done? And how do I find out if there is wiggle
              oom? From reading the accrediting agency (SACS) website, having 18 graduate
              ours of coursework isn't only the way to be credentialled:
              from SACS FAQ page: http://www.sacscoc.org/FAQsanswers.asp#q14
              Institutions are required to document and justify that each faculty member is
              ualified to teach assigned courses. Documentation and justification may be
              ccomplished by using only traditional academic credentials, by using a
              ombination of traditional academic credentials and “other” qualifications, or
              y using only “other” qualifications consistent with Comprehensive Standard
              .7.1, and reporting these on the Commission’s faculty roster form. In essence,
              he institution is called upon to “make its case” for why the faculty member is
              ualified to teach courses assigned.

              If the traditional academic credential approach is used, then following the
              aculty Credential guidelines will prove very helpful. When the qualifying
              redential aligns with the courses being taught, no justification is normally
              equired as the credential speaks for itself, e.g. Ph.D. in English teaching
              nglish. However, if the Ph.D. is in Business Administration and the faculty
              ember is teaching Accounting, then a written justification is normally
              ecessary.

              If a combination of traditional credentials and “other” credentials is used,
              r if the “other” qualifications only approach is used, then a portfolio
              pproach for qualifications is suggested. This approach normally requires a
              areful and thorough justification that demonstrates the linkage between the
              arious components of the portfolio of qualifications to the courses being
              aught.
              Thanks for the guidance!
              Conal Ho
              ------------------------------------
              Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
              Individual Email | Traditional
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