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RE: [SACC-L] Input needed for an upcoming Gender Equity Roundtable at AAA

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  • Kaupp, Ann
    Washington Post articles on gender gap in pay scale One year out of college, women already paid less than men, report finds Study finds a gender gap in pay
    Message 1 of 2 , Oct 24, 2012
      Washington Post articles on gender gap in pay scale

      One year out of college, women already paid less than men, report finds

      Study finds a gender gap in pay among recent college graduates

      By Jenna Johnson, The Washington Post Oct. 24, 2012

      Women are attending college at higher rates than men, graduating in greater numbers and earning higher grades. Yet one year after graduation, women were making only 82 percent of what their male colleagues were paid, according to a report by the American Association of University Women set to be released Wednesday.

      Nearly every occupation has long paid men more than women, despite laws aimed at narrowing and dissolving the differences. Often the gap is attributed to men picking careers with higher salaries, women slowing their careers after having children and differences in work experience. The AAUW researchers decided to look at workers when they are most similar - freshly done with their undergraduate studies, lacking vast experience and unlikely to have spouses or children.

      They focused on those who graduated during the 2007-08 school year, zeroed in on full-time workers and studied what they earned in 2009, one year after graduation. The women made only 82 percent of what the men were paid, with the average woman making $35,296 while men were paid an average of $42,918.

      The report relied on data from an Education Department survey of about 15,000 college graduates via Web or telephone surveys.

      Even when men and women had the same majors, there were often gaps in pay. The researchers found that female business majors earned an average of slightly more than $38,000, while men earned just over $45,000. In engineering, technology, computer science and social sciences fields, researchers found that women made between 77 percent and 88 percent of what their male colleagues were paid. (The health-care and education fields were credited for paying men and women about the same.)

      But the overall gap - the 18-percentage-point disparity - could be explained by career choices; men are more likely to enter high-paying fields such as engineering and computer science. The researchers controlled for that, along with other variables, but an "unexplained" 6.6-percentage-point gap remained.

      "This pay gap is not merely the result of women's choices," researchers Christianne Corbett and Catherine Hill wrote in their report, "Graduating to a Pay Gap." "Lower earnings have an immediate effect after college, setting into motion a chain of disparities that will follow women throughout their careers."

      One of those disparities: If women earn less, they will have a harder time repaying their student loans, a "significant and growing problem," the researchers wrote. For the Class of 2008, the average amount of student loan debt was about $20,000, an amount that didn't vary much between the genders, although women were more likely than men to have taken out loans.

      The researchers put forward suggestions for reducing the pay gap, including encouraging women to pursue careers in higher-paying fields and to negotiate higher pay.

      "A problem as long-standing and widespread as the pay gap, however, cannot be solved by the actions of individual women alone," the researchers wrote. "Employers and the government have important roles to play. The pay gap has been part of the workplace so long that it has become simply normal."


      Posted at 01:36 PM ET, 10/24/2012 The Washington Post Starting salaries: How can women catch up with the guys?
      By Jenna Johnson

      The American Association of University Women released a report today showing that one year after graduating college, men already made more money than women.

      Overall, the pay gap was 18 percent. When adjusting for different career choices and other variables, the gap was 6.6 percent. (You can read more here: "One year out of college, women already paid less than men, report finds.")

      In addition to explaining the gap and possible reasons for it, the association's researchers also gave a list of recommendations for narrowing and dissolving the gap. The researchers advocated for employers to increase transparency in their pay and evaluation systems, along with urging policy makers to strength and pass pay equity laws, protect Pell grant funding and protect students from questionable loans.

      They noted: "A problem as long-standing and widespread as the pay gap, however, cannot be solved by the actions of individual women alone. Employers and the government have important roles to play."

      But they also laid out a number of things that students and others can do. Here are a few, which I pulled directly from chapter four of the report, "Graduating to a Pay Gap":

      High school and college students
      * Educate yourself about typical salaries for various college majors. Consider future earnings when making the critical decision of college major. Your choice will affect the economic security of you and your family throughout your lifetime.
      * If you must borrow money for college, educate yourself about the terms associated with public and private student loans. Exhaust your federal borrowing options before considering more risky private student loans.
      *Attend a $tart $mart salary negotiation workshop at a campus near you.



      -----Original Message-----
      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Diane Levine
      Sent: Tuesday, October 23, 2012 3:32 PM
      To: SACC-L
      Subject: [SACC-L] Input needed for an upcoming Gender Equity Roundtable at AAA

      Hi All:

      I have been asked to represent SACC at a Roundtable Session entitled "Without Boundaries? Gender Equity in Anthropology." (It is sponsored by CoGEA - Committee on Gender Equity in Anthropology--and will be on Thursday, Nov 15 at 10:15 am.)

      In order to be a good representative of SACC, please let me know some of the concerns common for our section on the topic of gender equity. For
      instance:

      - * What should or could be the key initiatives to advocate for
      and educate our membership on gender equity.
      - * What is purview of gender equity monitoring?
      - * What are the advocacy priorities for the promotion of gender
      equity in our discipline?
      - * What are the most vulnerable sites for gender inequities
      where anthropologists work and learn?
      - * What are the particular concerns for SACC's membership on
      gender equity?
      - * Do you have any suggestions for continued consultation on
      gender equity?

      Feel free to comment on any (or all) of the questions.



      Thanks,


      Diane


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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