Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue

Expand Messages
  • Deborah Shepherd
    Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4 segments in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate intelligence that I showed to
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 2, 2012
    • 0 Attachment
      Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4 segments
      in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate intelligence that I
      showed to my students once.



      Deborah



      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      Lloyd Miller
      Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 6:44 PM
      To: SACC ListServ
      Subject: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue





      I just saw a piece on the PBS News Hour tonight that showcased Alan Alda's
      efforts to make science more understandable to young people, and apparently
      he's been quite successful, according to the young students interviewed and
      observed on the program. Maybe there's hope!

      Lloyd





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Katrina Worley
      I think you re thing of the Scientific American Frontiers show he did for PBS (http://www.pbs.org/saf/). I use some of those episodes in my various classes.
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 2, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        I think you're thing of the Scientific American Frontiers show he did for PBS (http://www.pbs.org/saf/). I use some of those episodes in my various classes. There are a couple dealing with primate behavior ("Prime-Time Primates", "Chimp Minds" and "Chimps R US"), and a number that I show in archaeology ("Coming Into America", "Unearthing Secret America" and "The Secret Canyon"). The episodes are viewable from the PBS website, and some can be purchased for a couple of bucks through iTunes (I load them onto my iPad, so I can show them whenever it seems appropriate). They're engaging, and Alda does the "wow! that's so cool" thing without it being annoying. As my students would say, I <3 Alan Alda.

        Katrina
        --
        Katrina Worley

        History: special people in special places at special times.
        Anthropology: everyone else the rest of the time...




        On Jul 2, 2012, at 6:02 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

        > Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4 segments
        > in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate intelligence that I
        > showed to my students once.
        >
        > Deborah
        >
        > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        > Lloyd Miller
        > Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 6:44 PM
        > To: SACC ListServ
        > Subject: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue
        >
        > I just saw a piece on the PBS News Hour tonight that showcased Alan Alda's
        > efforts to make science more understandable to young people, and apparently
        > he's been quite successful, according to the young students interviewed and
        > observed on the program. Maybe there's hope!
        >
        > Lloyd
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mark Lewine
        As I reflect from retirement, I discovered that though I loved anthropology, I had begun to see myself as an educator first...then I realized that viewing
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 2, 2012
        • 0 Attachment
          As I reflect from retirement, I discovered that though I loved anthropology,
          I had begun to see myself as an educator first...then I realized that
          viewing myself as an "anthropologist" and as a "professor" in an "academic
          culture" too often presented me with cultural barriers toward learning and
          educating...barriers which slowed the learning process for myself and
          students. Cultures of course, present us with beliefs, values and identities
          which often resist fast-paced change and adaptive learning.

          I suggest that resistance toward math and science in the US is in part a
          cultural problem with both students and faculty on all levels, beginning in
          K-12...in India, math is taught as a language necessary for understanding
          science and taught early on, without isolation from other subjects, by
          teachers that know what they are doing. In the U.S., if you are lucky enough
          to get a trained math teacher, you get her or him in junior high school and
          the subject is often isolated from other subjects. Our academic culture,
          our educational culture, and our professional teaching culture all seem to
          deny the need for "teachers" to be fluent in the language, methods,
          techniques, practices and applied theories of education. (I would add
          multicultural education, of course) In my fourth year of teaching at
          community college, I found myself in an applied education doctoral program
          that was pragmatic and learning/learner focused. It was amazing, but as it
          was applied, I found my that my doctorate was disrespected by my
          'colleagues' in the academy, even in SACC. I tried to share some of the
          applied research papers that I wrote, without much success until I just
          shared some of the techniques that worked with some new faculty...they found
          success and it spread. When I did workshops on new ways to understand race
          and human variation, I was shocked to find that the strongest resistance to
          learning came from ministers, social workers and TEACHERS. It is about
          power over the process which we believe is owned by US. ...SO, THOSE OF YOU
          WHO DENY THE VALIDITY OF WEB LEARNING...AS WELL AS THOSE OF YOU WHO WANT TO
          SEE SUCCESSFUL TEACHING OF MATH AND NOW SCIENCE, AND EVEN HISTORY...PLEASE
          EXPLORE KHAN ACADEMY...I HAVE DONE A NUMBER OF HIS TECHNIQUES (BEFORE
          READING THEM) AND FOUND THAT THEY WORKED, THOUGH I ALSO FOUND THAT I COULD
          NOT FIND PROFS WHO WOULD LISTEN TO THE RESULTS. TRY IT, AND YOU WILL LIKE
          IT. Here is a sample to explore...it is aimed at K-12, but the methods are
          perfect for web learning in community colleges, and show how to make web
          learning more effective than most classroom learning...supportive contact
          and timely learning support by the prof. is absolutely necessary, of course.
          How to use this toolkit

          --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

          If you're interested in using Khan Academy at your school or in your
          classroom, then these resources are for you.

          Khan Academy can be used in many wonderful and creative ways, and we're
          always thrilled to hear about how it's helping to enhance student learning.
          Many of the suggestions in the toolkit come from classrooms currently
          piloting Khan Academy, and while they reflect our best knowledge of KA in
          classrooms to-date, other techniques may work better in your classroom. As
          you discover methods that work well for you, please add them to our FAQs!

          Depending on how you're planning to use Khan Academy in your classroom,
          different parts of the toolkit may be most useful to you.


          Supplemental models: If you're interested in using Khan Academy as a
          supplemental resource (e.g., in a learning lab, as an optional or additional
          homework tool, as a curriculum resource), check out our sections on setting
          up accounts, keys to success, instructional strategies, using data, and our
          FAQs.

          Individualized units: In our pilot, some teachers use Khan Academy to create
          individualized units, in which students cover grade-level standards at their
          own pace. If you're interested in using Khan Academy in this way, all of the
          resources here should be helpful to you. In particular, check out our
          sections on classroom culture, using data, and individualized units.

          Future models: We're really excited about working with teachers and
          administrators who want to challenge some of the basic assumptions in
          education to meet each student's needs. The possibilities are endless, but
          some of the ideas we're hoping to see:

          a.. Mixed-age classes
          b.. Self-paced learning, even outside of grade-level standards (i.e.,
          students could learn topics below or above grade level, depending on their
          needs)
          c.. Significant use of real-world problem-solving and meaningful
          project-based learning
          d.. Cross-disciplinary courses
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Katrina Worley" <kworley@...>
          To: <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 10:12 PM
          Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue


          >I think you're thing of the Scientific American Frontiers show he did for
          >PBS (http://www.pbs.org/saf/). I use some of those episodes in my various
          >classes. There are a couple dealing with primate behavior ("Prime-Time
          >Primates", "Chimp Minds" and "Chimps R US"), and a number that I show in
          >archaeology ("Coming Into America", "Unearthing Secret America" and "The
          >Secret Canyon"). The episodes are viewable from the PBS website, and some
          >can be purchased for a couple of bucks through iTunes (I load them onto my
          >iPad, so I can show them whenever it seems appropriate). They're engaging,
          >and Alda does the "wow! that's so cool" thing without it being annoying. As
          >my students would say, I <3 Alan Alda.
          >
          > Katrina
          > --
          > Katrina Worley
          >
          > History: special people in special places at special times.
          > Anthropology: everyone else the rest of the time...
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > On Jul 2, 2012, at 6:02 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:
          >
          >> Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4
          >> segments
          >> in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate intelligence that I
          >> showed to my students once.
          >>
          >> Deborah
          >>
          >> From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
          >> Lloyd Miller
          >> Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 6:44 PM
          >> To: SACC ListServ
          >> Subject: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue
          >>
          >> I just saw a piece on the PBS News Hour tonight that showcased Alan
          >> Alda's
          >> efforts to make science more understandable to young people, and
          >> apparently
          >> he's been quite successful, according to the young students interviewed
          >> and
          >> observed on the program. Maybe there's hope!
          >>
          >> Lloyd
          >>
          >> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >>
          >>
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kaupp, Ann
          Alan Alda hosted Scientific American Frontiers. I happened to walk by Dennis Stanford s office a few years ago when Alda was interviewing him. From:
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
          • 0 Attachment
            Alan Alda hosted Scientific American Frontiers. I happened to walk by Dennis Stanford's office a few years ago when Alda was interviewing him.


            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Deborah Shepherd
            Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 9:02 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue



            Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4 segments
            in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate intelligence that I
            showed to my students once.

            Deborah

            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of
            Lloyd Miller
            Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 6:44 PM
            To: SACC ListServ
            Subject: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue

            I just saw a piece on the PBS News Hour tonight that showcased Alan Alda's
            efforts to make science more understandable to young people, and apparently
            he's been quite successful, according to the young students interviewed and
            observed on the program. Maybe there's hope!

            Lloyd

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Deborah Shepherd
            Yes, that s right. The heat fried my brain several days ago. Hope everyone is doing okay. Deborah ... From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 3, 2012
            • 0 Attachment
              Yes, that's right. The heat fried my brain several days ago. Hope everyone
              is doing okay.

              Deborah

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              Katrina Worley
              Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 9:12 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue

              I think you're thing of the Scientific American Frontiers show he did for
              PBS (http://www.pbs.org/saf/). I use some of those episodes in my various
              classes. There are a couple dealing with primate behavior ("Prime-Time
              Primates", "Chimp Minds" and "Chimps R US"), and a number that I show in
              archaeology ("Coming Into America", "Unearthing Secret America" and "The
              Secret Canyon"). The episodes are viewable from the PBS website, and some
              can be purchased for a couple of bucks through iTunes (I load them onto my
              iPad, so I can show them whenever it seems appropriate). They're engaging,
              and Alda does the "wow! that's so cool" thing without it being annoying. As
              my students would say, I <3 Alan Alda.

              Katrina
              --
              Katrina Worley

              History: special people in special places at special times.
              Anthropology: everyone else the rest of the time...




              On Jul 2, 2012, at 6:02 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

              > Alda used to do a Smithsonian-something television show with 3 or 4
              > segments in an hour. (Ann will know!) He had one on primate
              > intelligence that I showed to my students once.
              >
              > Deborah
              >
              > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              > Of Lloyd Miller
              > Sent: Monday, July 02, 2012 6:44 PM
              > To: SACC ListServ
              > Subject: [SACC-L] Alan Alda to the rescue
              >
              > I just saw a piece on the PBS News Hour tonight that showcased Alan
              > Alda's efforts to make science more understandable to young people,
              > and apparently he's been quite successful, according to the young
              > students interviewed and observed on the program. Maybe there's hope!
              >
              > Lloyd
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



              ------------------------------------

              Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.