Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

Expand Messages
  • Deborah Shepherd
    Don t forget that Montreal has subterranean pedestrian tunnels tied in with the subway system. I was once in Montreal in late December when an ice storm made
    Message 1 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
      Don't forget that Montreal has subterranean pedestrian tunnels tied in with
      the subway system. I was once in Montreal in late December when an ice storm
      made walking outdoors a death-defying experience. Then we found out about
      the tunnels and lived to see another day. (Remember, I am from Minnesota. It
      isn't the cold, but the ice that matters, but you can use the tunnels
      anytime you like.)


      On Tue, Sep 13, 2011 at 11:56 AM, Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...>wrote:

      > Congratulations, Dianne! I remember the Queen Elizabeth. Bob, I also
      > remember bundling up while walking through a cold drizzle, reminding me of
      > many winter days in Chicago.
      >
      > I notice that the Holiday Inn Select (the cheapest that AAA lists) is only
      > a block from the Convention Center, but with taxes it would be around $175 a
      > night. The Travelodge Montreal Centre, 0.3 mile from the Convention Center,
      > offers a room with double-size bed, taxes included for $102 Canadian; add
      > about $20 for a queen-size.
      >
      > At this point, regrettably, my searches are moot. I've decided that I just
      > can't spend the $ to go to Montreal. However, I look forward with
      > anticipation and delight to San Diego in April.
      >
      > Lloyd
      >
      >
      > On Sep 13, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:
      >
      > > I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
      > Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center, but
      > it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the Society
      > for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the same time, and
      > Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings at the convention
      > meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple times. Remember though,
      > Montreal in November may not be great, weather-wise.
      > >
      > > Bob
      > >
      > > >>> <dianne.chidester@...> 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
      > > I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
      > > for the AAA. Yippee!
      > >
      > > Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
      > > Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
      > > guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
      > >
      > > See you in Montreal!
      > >
      > > Dianne
      > >
      > > Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
      > >
      > > Anthropology & Sociology
      > >
      > > Greenville Technical College
      > >
      > > P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
      > >
      > > Greenville, SC 29607
      > >
      > > 864-250-8729
      > >
      > > "You've got to be taught to hate and fear
      > >
      > > You've got to be taught from year to year
      > >
      > > It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
      > >
      > > You've got to be carefully taught"
      > >
      > > --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
      > >
      > > ----------
      > >
      > > This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
      > recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any
      > unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you
      > are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and
      > destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and
      > knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and
      > malware.
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Bob Muckle
      By not great , think of possibilities of rain, maybe dipping below freezing at night. Bob ... Bob, By not great, what are we talking about? Canadian not
      Message 2 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
        By "not great", think of possibilities of rain, maybe dipping below freezing at night.

        Bob


        >>> "Laura Gonzalez" <ltgonzalez@...> 9/13/2011 9:55 AM >>>
        Bob,



        By "not great," what are we talking about? Canadian "not great" has got to
        be way beyond California "not great."



        Laura



        _____

        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Bob Muckle
        Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 9:21 AM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





        I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the Queen
        Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center, but it
        wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the Society
        for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the same time, and
        Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings at the convention
        meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple times. Remember though,
        Montreal in November may not be great, weather-wise.

        Bob

        >>> <dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> >
        9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
        I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
        for the AAA. Yippee!

        Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
        Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
        guess I can mapquest to find that out.)

        See you in Montreal!

        Dianne

        Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor

        Anthropology & Sociology

        Greenville Technical College

        P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042

        Greenville, SC 29607

        864-250-8729

        "You've got to be taught to hate and fear

        You've got to be taught from year to year

        It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear

        You've got to be carefully taught"

        --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific

        ----------

        This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
        recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any
        unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you
        are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and
        destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and
        knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and
        malware.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kaupp, Ann
        Yes, it was the Queen Elizabeth and suppose to be around 9 blocks from the convention center. ... From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com]
        Message 3 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
          Yes, it was the Queen Elizabeth and suppose to be around 9 blocks from the convention center.



          -----Original Message-----
          From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lloyd Miller
          Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:57 PM
          To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

          Congratulations, Dianne! I remember the Queen Elizabeth. Bob, I also remember bundling up while walking through a cold drizzle, reminding me of many winter days in Chicago.

          I notice that the Holiday Inn Select (the cheapest that AAA lists) is only a block from the Convention Center, but with taxes it would be around $175 a night. The Travelodge Montreal Centre, 0.3 mile from the Convention Center, offers a room with double-size bed, taxes included for $102 Canadian; add about $20 for a queen-size.

          At this point, regrettably, my searches are moot. I've decided that I just can't spend the $ to go to Montreal. However, I look forward with anticipation and delight to San Diego in April.

          Lloyd


          On Sep 13, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:

          > I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center, but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great, weather-wise.
          >
          > Bob
          >
          > >>> <dianne.chidester@...> 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
          > I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
          > for the AAA. Yippee!
          >
          > Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
          > Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
          > guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
          >
          > See you in Montreal!
          >
          > Dianne
          >
          > Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
          >
          > Anthropology & Sociology
          >
          > Greenville Technical College
          >
          > P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
          >
          > Greenville, SC 29607
          >
          > 864-250-8729
          >
          > "You've got to be taught to hate and fear
          >
          > You've got to be taught from year to year
          >
          > It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
          >
          > You've got to be carefully taught"
          >
          > --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
          >
          > ----------
          >
          > This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          ------------------------------------

          Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links
        • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
          Lloyd, Sorry to hear you won t be in Montreal. I ll miss those drinks and conversations. Maybe we should choose a SACC hotel! --Dianne From:
          Message 4 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
            Lloyd, Sorry to hear you won't be in Montreal. I'll miss those drinks
            and conversations.



            Maybe we should choose a SACC hotel!



            --Dianne



            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
            Of Kaupp, Ann
            Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 1:23 PM
            To: 'SACC-L@yahoogroups.com'
            Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





            Yes, it was the Queen Elizabeth and suppose to be around 9 blocks from
            the convention center.

            -----Original Message-----
            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
            SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
            Lloyd Miller
            Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:57 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

            Congratulations, Dianne! I remember the Queen Elizabeth. Bob, I also
            remember bundling up while walking through a cold drizzle, reminding me
            of many winter days in Chicago.

            I notice that the Holiday Inn Select (the cheapest that AAA lists) is
            only a block from the Convention Center, but with taxes it would be
            around $175 a night. The Travelodge Montreal Centre, 0.3 mile from the
            Convention Center, offers a room with double-size bed, taxes included
            for $102 Canadian; add about $20 for a queen-size.

            At this point, regrettably, my searches are moot. I've decided that I
            just can't spend the $ to go to Montreal. However, I look forward with
            anticipation and delight to San Diego in April.

            Lloyd

            On Sep 13, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:

            > I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
            Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
            but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
            Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
            same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
            at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
            times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
            weather-wise.
            >
            > Bob
            >
            > >>> <dianne.chidester@...
            <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> > 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
            > I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
            > for the AAA. Yippee!
            >
            > Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
            > Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
            > guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
            >
            > See you in Montreal!
            >
            > Dianne
            >
            > Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
            >
            > Anthropology & Sociology
            >
            > Greenville Technical College
            >
            > P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
            >
            > Greenville, SC 29607
            >
            > 864-250-8729
            >
            > "You've got to be taught to hate and fear
            >
            > You've got to be taught from year to year
            >
            > It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
            >
            > You've got to be carefully taught"
            >
            > --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
            >
            > ----------
            >
            > This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
            recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
            Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
            If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
            reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
            of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
            free of viruses and malware.
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------------------------------

            Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links




            ----------

            This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
            Mapquest says the Queen Elizabeth is .95 miles (driving) from the convention center. From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
            Message 5 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
              Mapquest says the Queen Elizabeth is .95 miles (driving) from the
              convention center.



              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of Kaupp, Ann
              Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 1:23 PM
              To: 'SACC-L@yahoogroups.com'
              Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





              Yes, it was the Queen Elizabeth and suppose to be around 9 blocks from
              the convention center.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
              [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
              Behalf Of Lloyd Miller
              Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:57 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

              Congratulations, Dianne! I remember the Queen Elizabeth. Bob, I also
              remember bundling up while walking through a cold drizzle, reminding me
              of many winter days in Chicago.

              I notice that the Holiday Inn Select (the cheapest that AAA lists) is
              only a block from the Convention Center, but with taxes it would be
              around $175 a night. The Travelodge Montreal Centre, 0.3 mile from the
              Convention Center, offers a room with double-size bed, taxes included
              for $102 Canadian; add about $20 for a queen-size.

              At this point, regrettably, my searches are moot. I've decided that I
              just can't spend the $ to go to Montreal. However, I look forward with
              anticipation and delight to San Diego in April.

              Lloyd

              On Sep 13, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:

              > I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
              Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
              but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
              Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
              same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
              at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
              times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
              weather-wise.
              >
              > Bob
              >
              > >>> <dianne.chidester@...
              <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> > 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
              > I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
              > for the AAA. Yippee!
              >
              > Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
              > Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
              > guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
              >
              > See you in Montreal!
              >
              > Dianne
              >
              > Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
              >
              > Anthropology & Sociology
              >
              > Greenville Technical College
              >
              > P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
              >
              > Greenville, SC 29607
              >
              > 864-250-8729
              >
              > "You've got to be taught to hate and fear
              >
              > You've got to be taught from year to year
              >
              > It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
              >
              > You've got to be carefully taught"
              >
              > --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
              >
              > ----------
              >
              > This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
              recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
              Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
              If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
              reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
              of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
              free of viruses and malware.
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------------------------------

              Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links





              This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
              Their website lists the price as about $229/night. (That s out of my budget even with school help!)--Dianne From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
                Their website lists the price as about $229/night. (That's out of my
                budget even with school help!)--Dianne



                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of dianne.chidester@...
                Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 2:12 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





                Mapquest says the Queen Elizabeth is .95 miles (driving) from the
                convention center.

                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                Behalf
                Of Kaupp, Ann
                Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 1:23 PM
                To: 'SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:%27SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> '
                Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

                Yes, it was the Queen Elizabeth and suppose to be around 9 blocks from
                the convention center.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
                Behalf Of Lloyd Miller
                Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:57 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

                Congratulations, Dianne! I remember the Queen Elizabeth. Bob, I also
                remember bundling up while walking through a cold drizzle, reminding me
                of many winter days in Chicago.

                I notice that the Holiday Inn Select (the cheapest that AAA lists) is
                only a block from the Convention Center, but with taxes it would be
                around $175 a night. The Travelodge Montreal Centre, 0.3 mile from the
                Convention Center, offers a room with double-size bed, taxes included
                for $102 Canadian; add about $20 for a queen-size.

                At this point, regrettably, my searches are moot. I've decided that I
                just can't spend the $ to go to Montreal. However, I look forward with
                anticipation and delight to San Diego in April.

                Lloyd

                On Sep 13, 2011, at 11:21 AM, Bob Muckle wrote:

                > I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
                Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
                but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
                Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
                same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
                at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
                times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
                weather-wise.
                >
                > Bob
                >
                > >>> <dianne.chidester@...
                <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu>
                <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> > 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
                > I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
                > for the AAA. Yippee!
                >
                > Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
                > Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
                > guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
                >
                > See you in Montreal!
                >
                > Dianne
                >
                > Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
                >
                > Anthropology & Sociology
                >
                > Greenville Technical College
                >
                > P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
                >
                > Greenville, SC 29607
                >
                > 864-250-8729
                >
                > "You've got to be taught to hate and fear
                >
                > You've got to be taught from year to year
                >
                > It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
                >
                > You've got to be carefully taught"
                >
                > --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
                >
                > ----------
                >
                > This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                free of viruses and malware.
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                ------------------------------------

                Find out more at our web site http://saccweb.net/ Yahoo! Groups Links

                This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                free of viruses and malware.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Mark Lewine
                Bob, is the Hilton Garden-Inn reasonable close to the convention centre? the price there is $149... 380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0B1
                Message 7 of 25 , Sep 13, 2011
                  Bob, is the Hilton Garden-Inn reasonable close to the convention centre? the price there is $149...


                  380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0B1
                  Tel: 1-514-840-0010 Fax: 1-514-844-6433

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Bob Muckle
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:21 PM
                  Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels



                  I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center, but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great, weather-wise.

                  Bob

                  >>> <dianne.chidester@...> 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
                  I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
                  for the AAA. Yippee!

                  Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
                  Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
                  guess I can mapquest to find that out.)

                  See you in Montreal!

                  Dianne

                  Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor

                  Anthropology & Sociology

                  Greenville Technical College

                  P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042

                  Greenville, SC 29607

                  864-250-8729

                  "You've got to be taught to hate and fear

                  You've got to be taught from year to year

                  It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear

                  You've got to be carefully taught"

                  --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific

                  ----------

                  This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
                  Mapquest says it s about .43 driving miles. It looks like it might even be shorter walking distance. -- Dianne From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Message 8 of 25 , Sep 14, 2011
                    Mapquest says it's about .43 driving miles. It looks like it might even
                    be shorter walking distance. -- Dianne



                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                    Of Mark Lewine
                    Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:47 AM
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





                    Bob, is the Hilton Garden-Inn reasonable close to the convention centre?
                    the price there is $149...

                    380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0B1
                    Tel: 1-514-840-0010 Fax: 1-514-844-6433

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Bob Muckle
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:21 PM
                    Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels

                    I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
                    Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
                    but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
                    Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
                    same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
                    at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
                    times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
                    weather-wise.

                    Bob

                    >>> <dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu>
                    > 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
                    I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
                    for the AAA. Yippee!

                    Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
                    Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
                    guess I can mapquest to find that out.)

                    See you in Montreal!

                    Dianne

                    Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor

                    Anthropology & Sociology

                    Greenville Technical College

                    P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042

                    Greenville, SC 29607

                    864-250-8729

                    "You've got to be taught to hate and fear

                    You've got to be taught from year to year

                    It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear

                    You've got to be carefully taught"

                    --Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific

                    ----------

                    This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                    recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                    Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                    If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                    reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                    of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                    free of viruses and malware.

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                    ----------

                    This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Nikki Ives
                    Just an FYI - Google maps has walking directions. Nikki ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    Message 9 of 25 , Sep 14, 2011
                      Just an FYI - Google maps has walking directions.

                      Nikki




                      >________________________________
                      >From: "dianne.chidester@..." <dianne.chidester@...>
                      >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      >Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:25 AM
                      >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                      >
                      >

                      >Mapquest says it's about .43 driving miles. It looks like it might even
                      >be shorter walking distance. -- Dianne
                      >
                      >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                      >Of Mark Lewine
                      >Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:47 AM
                      >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                      >
                      >Bob, is the Hilton Garden-Inn reasonable close to the convention centre?
                      >the price there is $149...
                      >
                      >380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0B1
                      >Tel: 1-514-840-0010 Fax: 1-514-844-6433
                      >
                      >----- Original Message -----
                      >From: Bob Muckle
                      >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                      >Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:21 PM
                      >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                      >
                      >I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
                      >Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
                      >but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
                      >Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
                      >same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
                      >at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
                      >times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
                      >weather-wise.
                      >
                      >Bob
                      >
                      >>>> <dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu>
                      >> 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
                      >I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
                      >for the AAA. Yippee!
                      >
                      >Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
                      >Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
                      >guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
                      >
                      >See you in Montreal!
                      >
                      >Dianne
                      >
                      >Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
                      >
                      >Anthropology & Sociology
                      >
                      >Greenville Technical College
                      >
                      >P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
                      >
                      >Greenville, SC 29607
                      >
                      >864-250-8729
                      >
                      >"You've got to be taught to hate and fear
                      >
                      >You've got to be taught from year to year
                      >
                      >It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
                      >
                      >You've got to be carefully taught"
                      >
                      >--Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
                      >
                      >----------
                      >
                      >This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                      >recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                      >Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                      >If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                      >reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                      >of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                      >free of viruses and malware.
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >----------
                      >
                      >This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.
                      >
                      >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
                      Thanks! It says it’s about an 8 minute walk from the Hilton Garden Inn. -- Dianne From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                      Message 10 of 25 , Sep 14, 2011
                        Thanks! It says it’s about an 8 minute walk from the Hilton Garden Inn. -- Dianne



                        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                        Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 8:56 AM
                        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels





                        Just an FYI - Google maps has walking directions.

                        Nikki

                        >________________________________
                        >From: "dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> " <dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> >
                        >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                        >Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 7:25 AM
                        >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >Mapquest says it's about .43 driving miles. It looks like it might even
                        >be shorter walking distance. -- Dianne
                        >
                        >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
                        >Of Mark Lewine
                        >Sent: Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:47 AM
                        >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                        >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                        >
                        >Bob, is the Hilton Garden-Inn reasonable close to the convention centre?
                        >the price there is $149...
                        >
                        >380 Sherbrooke St. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 0B1
                        >Tel: 1-514-840-0010 Fax: 1-514-844-6433
                        >
                        >----- Original Message -----
                        >From: Bob Muckle
                        >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                        >Sent: Tuesday, September 13, 2011 12:21 PM
                        >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Montreal Hotels
                        >
                        >I think the hotel used for the 2004 SACC meeting in Montreal was the
                        >Queen Elizabeth. It is within walking distance to the convention center,
                        >but it wasn't necessarily a real short walk. While SACC was meeting, the
                        >Society for American Archaeology (SAA) was meeting in Montreal at the
                        >same time, and Phil arranged for SACC members to attend the SAA meetings
                        >at the convention meetings for free! I made the walk over multiple
                        >times. Remember though, Montreal in November may not be great,
                        >weather-wise.
                        >
                        >Bob
                        >
                        >>>> <dianne.chidester@... <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu> <mailto:dianne.chidester%40gvltec.edu>
                        >> 9/13/2011 9:09 AM >>>
                        >I just got word that my school is going to give me some travel support
                        >for the AAA. Yippee!
                        >
                        >Does anyone remember the name of the hotel we stayed in when Phil
                        >Naftaly organized the meetings? Is it near the conference center? (I
                        >guess I can mapquest to find that out.)
                        >
                        >See you in Montreal!
                        >
                        >Dianne
                        >
                        >Dianne Lynn Chidester, Assistant Professor
                        >
                        >Anthropology & Sociology
                        >
                        >Greenville Technical College
                        >
                        >P.O. Box 5616 MS 1042
                        >
                        >Greenville, SC 29607
                        >
                        >864-250-8729
                        >
                        >"You've got to be taught to hate and fear
                        >
                        >You've got to be taught from year to year
                        >
                        >It's got to be drummed in your dear little ear
                        >
                        >You've got to be carefully taught"
                        >
                        >--Rodgers & Hammerstein South Pacific
                        >
                        >----------
                        >
                        >This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                        >recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                        >Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                        >If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                        >reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                        >of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                        >free of viruses and malware.
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >----------
                        >
                        >This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.
                        >
                        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >

                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                        ----------

                        This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Hare II, William E
                        Hi Everyone, I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college s courtyards to use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                        Message 11 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                          Hi Everyone,



                          I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                          use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                          with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                          meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                          spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.



                          Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:



                          1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                          subsistence horticulture.

                          2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                          could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                          bury the artifacts in the spring.

                          3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                          more interesting.





                          I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                          for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                          are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                          have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                          courtyards will be open to the public.



                          Thanks,



                          Will



                          William Hare

                          Associate Professor of Anthropology

                          Three Rivers Community College



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
                          Will, Another option could be an American Indian garden. I know the gardens at Sunwatch Village in Ohio were recreated by Gail Wagner (U South Carolina). You
                          Message 12 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                            Will,



                            Another option could be an American Indian garden. I know the gardens
                            at Sunwatch Village in Ohio were recreated by Gail Wagner (U South
                            Carolina).



                            You might also have a Master Gardener program through the Agriculture
                            Extension Service and they might help. Also check for Native Plant
                            Societies in your area. They are a huge help. (I've been trying to put
                            all native plants in my yard.)



                            Cheers!

                            Dianne



                            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                            Of Hare II, William E
                            Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:25 AM
                            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening







                            Hi Everyone,

                            I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                            use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                            with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                            meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                            spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.

                            Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:

                            1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                            subsistence horticulture.

                            2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                            could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                            bury the artifacts in the spring.

                            3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                            more interesting.

                            I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                            for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                            are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                            have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                            courtyards will be open to the public.

                            Thanks,

                            Will

                            William Hare

                            Associate Professor of Anthropology

                            Three Rivers Community College

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                            ----------

                            This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Andrew Petto
                            You could actually combine 1 & 2: do the horticultural bit, but then treat is as an experimental archeology lab, too. Have students who have not participated
                            Message 13 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                              You could actually combine 1 & 2: do the horticultural bit, but then
                              treat is as an experimental archeology lab, too. Have students who have
                              not participated in the gardening try to infer the practices based on
                              the "data" that the gardeners left behind.

                              How big is the area? Is there any chance that it will produce enough
                              produce for you to have a presence in your campus's "multicultural"
                              programming? Say, if you only grow plants indigenous to the region as
                              cultivated by the area's original inhabitants?

                              As far as GMOs are concerned, there is one caveat: research into
                              genomics is blurring the genetic lines among species and lineages. Even
                              though we are jumping ahead in the line when we insert specific genes
                              into organisms to produce food or disease resistance, remember that this
                              sort of genetic change is exactly what we are doing when we breed
                              organisms selectively for these traits; or graft plants; or produce
                              hybrid plants and animals; or treat these organisms with substances that
                              alter the expression of genes ---- all standard, traditional,
                              "conservative" practices that have essentially the same results (think
                              of the "green revolution" in the mid 20th century that created more
                              productive grain crops by genetic alterations). Furthermore, each round
                              of infection by some bacterium or virus seems to leave traces inserted
                              into the genome in precisely the same way as GMO production does.

                              I can see no essential difference in the intentions of the people doing
                              this; the only real question is whether the action may produce
                              unintended consequences (it almost certain does, since even the
                              "old-fashioned" way of changing the genome has these consequences) and
                              to what effect they are harmful (or more harmful doing it one way than
                              the other).

                              The main issue is how rapidly the change appears and spreads through a
                              population. Of course, in GMOs we get the result we want (specific
                              differences in the genome) more quickly, but so far, the evidence is
                              that it spreads among native populations (during an accidental release)
                              in the same way and at about the same pace as other genetic changes. I
                              think good examples of how we might expect an accidentally released GMO
                              to change native populations can be found in the history of Gypsy moth
                              caterpillars and so-called "Africanized bees. And now there has been an
                              accidental release in Mexico (a few years back) of a GMO corn variety;
                              have not heard anything about that, so I suspect that dire warnings were
                              not realized ... but will go back and try to find out.

                              I think it is worth exploring the issue of people's reactions to GMO;
                              the best thing we can say about them is that there is insufficient
                              evidence to conclude and one might want to err on the side of
                              precaution. But---as with evolution and climate change---the real
                              objections seem to be sociocultural and political and not scientific. We
                              are worried (with good cause) about hubris; we are concerned that these
                              actions are to anthropocentric and may cause harm to the environment
                              (but of course, there are lots of other things that we do that could not
                              stand that sort of scrutiny); we worry that we are "playing God" and
                              acting immorally or unethically --- It's not nice to fool Mother
                              Nature!; and so on.

                              I think a great case study here would be the so-called "Green
                              Revolution" beginning with Borlaug's work in the 40s. I would present
                              the issues of feeding the world, and the goal and the outcomes of the
                              research in the case, but without the technical details of how the
                              genetic change was brought about. Then ask students to gather data and
                              evidence to evaluate the appropriateness of that program.

                              I think you will recognize a sea change in the attitudes toward this
                              sort of scientific manipulation (remember "Better living through
                              chemistry"?) in comparing the 40s-70s with the 80s-2000s about genetic
                              alteration in crops (and this reflects a technologic change more than a
                              change in the programs to alter the genes of organisms). You will also
                              probably find a deep divide in students' acceptance of the genetic
                              alteration between the more tradition (cross breeding) approach common
                              in the 40s compared to the DNA insertion/deletion/inactivation
                              techniques in the 80s and 90s (which, BTW, is also how we make a lot of
                              our vaccines!).

                              Just thinking out loud!

                              Anj

                              On 9/16/2011 08:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > Hi Everyone,
                              >
                              > I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                              > use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                              > with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                              > meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                              > spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.
                              >
                              > Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:
                              >
                              > 1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                              > subsistence horticulture.
                              >
                              > 2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                              > could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                              > bury the artifacts in the spring.
                              >
                              > 3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                              > more interesting.
                              >
                              > I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                              > for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                              > are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                              > have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                              > courtyards will be open to the public.
                              >
                              > Thanks,
                              >
                              > Will
                              >
                              > William Hare
                              >
                              > Associate Professor of Anthropology
                              >
                              > Three Rivers Community College
                              >
                              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >

                              --

                              -----------------------------
                              Andrew J Petto, PhD
                              Senior Lecturer
                              Department of Biological Sciences
                              University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                              PO Box 413
                              Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                              CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                              Telephone: 414-229-6784
                              FAX: 414-229-3926
                              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                              *************
                              Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                              https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                              *************



                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Hare II, William E
                              Wow! That is a lot of thinking out loud. I have a couple of objectives with this potential project: 1. Get out courtyards to look less like abandoned
                              Message 14 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                Wow! That is a lot of thinking out loud.



                                I have a couple of objectives with this potential project:



                                1. Get out courtyards to look less like abandoned city lots.

                                2. Get my students to learn something about anthropology through
                                hands-on learning.

                                If I can find a diagram of what the layouts look like I will send them
                                to interested parties to make suggestions. Off the cuff I can tell you
                                that there are walkways dividing each courtyard into 3-4 plots that can
                                be used. I am only willing to take on the responsibility of one
                                courtyard.



                                Thanks,



                                Will



                                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                Of Andrew Petto
                                Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:57 AM
                                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening





                                You could actually combine 1 & 2: do the horticultural bit, but then
                                treat is as an experimental archeology lab, too. Have students who have
                                not participated in the gardening try to infer the practices based on
                                the "data" that the gardeners left behind.

                                How big is the area? Is there any chance that it will produce enough
                                produce for you to have a presence in your campus's "multicultural"
                                programming? Say, if you only grow plants indigenous to the region as
                                cultivated by the area's original inhabitants?

                                As far as GMOs are concerned, there is one caveat: research into
                                genomics is blurring the genetic lines among species and lineages. Even
                                though we are jumping ahead in the line when we insert specific genes
                                into organisms to produce food or disease resistance, remember that this

                                sort of genetic change is exactly what we are doing when we breed
                                organisms selectively for these traits; or graft plants; or produce
                                hybrid plants and animals; or treat these organisms with substances that

                                alter the expression of genes ---- all standard, traditional,
                                "conservative" practices that have essentially the same results (think
                                of the "green revolution" in the mid 20th century that created more
                                productive grain crops by genetic alterations). Furthermore, each round
                                of infection by some bacterium or virus seems to leave traces inserted
                                into the genome in precisely the same way as GMO production does.

                                I can see no essential difference in the intentions of the people doing
                                this; the only real question is whether the action may produce
                                unintended consequences (it almost certain does, since even the
                                "old-fashioned" way of changing the genome has these consequences) and
                                to what effect they are harmful (or more harmful doing it one way than
                                the other).

                                The main issue is how rapidly the change appears and spreads through a
                                population. Of course, in GMOs we get the result we want (specific
                                differences in the genome) more quickly, but so far, the evidence is
                                that it spreads among native populations (during an accidental release)
                                in the same way and at about the same pace as other genetic changes. I
                                think good examples of how we might expect an accidentally released GMO
                                to change native populations can be found in the history of Gypsy moth
                                caterpillars and so-called "Africanized bees. And now there has been an
                                accidental release in Mexico (a few years back) of a GMO corn variety;
                                have not heard anything about that, so I suspect that dire warnings were

                                not realized ... but will go back and try to find out.

                                I think it is worth exploring the issue of people's reactions to GMO;
                                the best thing we can say about them is that there is insufficient
                                evidence to conclude and one might want to err on the side of
                                precaution. But---as with evolution and climate change---the real
                                objections seem to be sociocultural and political and not scientific. We

                                are worried (with good cause) about hubris; we are concerned that these
                                actions are to anthropocentric and may cause harm to the environment
                                (but of course, there are lots of other things that we do that could not

                                stand that sort of scrutiny); we worry that we are "playing God" and
                                acting immorally or unethically --- It's not nice to fool Mother
                                Nature!; and so on.

                                I think a great case study here would be the so-called "Green
                                Revolution" beginning with Borlaug's work in the 40s. I would present
                                the issues of feeding the world, and the goal and the outcomes of the
                                research in the case, but without the technical details of how the
                                genetic change was brought about. Then ask students to gather data and
                                evidence to evaluate the appropriateness of that program.

                                I think you will recognize a sea change in the attitudes toward this
                                sort of scientific manipulation (remember "Better living through
                                chemistry"?) in comparing the 40s-70s with the 80s-2000s about genetic
                                alteration in crops (and this reflects a technologic change more than a
                                change in the programs to alter the genes of organisms). You will also
                                probably find a deep divide in students' acceptance of the genetic
                                alteration between the more tradition (cross breeding) approach common
                                in the 40s compared to the DNA insertion/deletion/inactivation
                                techniques in the 80s and 90s (which, BTW, is also how we make a lot of
                                our vaccines!).

                                Just thinking out loud!

                                Anj

                                On 9/16/2011 08:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > Hi Everyone,
                                >
                                > I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards
                                to
                                > use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become
                                overrun
                                > with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have
                                a
                                > meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                > spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.
                                >
                                > Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:
                                >
                                > 1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                > subsistence horticulture.
                                >
                                > 2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                > could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                > bury the artifacts in the spring.
                                >
                                > 3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                > more interesting.
                                >
                                > I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                > for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                > are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                > have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and
                                the
                                > courtyards will be open to the public.
                                >
                                > Thanks,
                                >
                                > Will
                                >
                                > William Hare
                                >
                                > Associate Professor of Anthropology
                                >
                                > Three Rivers Community College
                                >
                                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                >
                                >

                                --

                                -----------------------------
                                Andrew J Petto, PhD
                                Senior Lecturer
                                Department of Biological Sciences
                                University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                                PO Box 413
                                Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                                CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                                Telephone: 414-229-6784
                                FAX: 414-229-3926
                                https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                                *************
                                Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                                https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                                *************

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Hare II, William E
                                Hi Dianne, Great ideas and ones I will add to the potential list. We are located near the Mohegan and Pequot Tribal nations so a Native American garden might
                                Message 15 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                  Hi Dianne,



                                  Great ideas and ones I will add to the potential list. We are located
                                  near the Mohegan and Pequot Tribal nations so a Native American garden
                                  might make sense. I have also given thoughts to having a number of
                                  smaller plots representing different indigenous cultures (albeit
                                  governed by our New England climate).



                                  We have an active Extension Service program in CT, so they might be able
                                  to take on one of the other courtyards.



                                  Will



                                  From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                  Of dianne.chidester@...
                                  Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:37 AM
                                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: RE: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening





                                  Will,

                                  Another option could be an American Indian garden. I know the gardens
                                  at Sunwatch Village in Ohio were recreated by Gail Wagner (U South
                                  Carolina).

                                  You might also have a Master Gardener program through the Agriculture
                                  Extension Service and they might help. Also check for Native Plant
                                  Societies in your area. They are a huge help. (I've been trying to put
                                  all native plants in my yard.)

                                  Cheers!

                                  Dianne

                                  From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                                  SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
                                  Of Hare II, William E
                                  Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:25 AM
                                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                                  Subject: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening

                                  Hi Everyone,

                                  I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                                  use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                                  with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                                  meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                  spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.

                                  Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:

                                  1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                  subsistence horticulture.

                                  2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                  could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                  bury the artifacts in the spring.

                                  3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                  more interesting.

                                  I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                  for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                  are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                  have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                                  courtyards will be open to the public.

                                  Thanks,

                                  Will

                                  William Hare

                                  Associate Professor of Anthropology

                                  Three Rivers Community College

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                  ----------

                                  This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended
                                  recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information.
                                  Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited.
                                  If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by
                                  reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best
                                  of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is
                                  free of viruses and malware.

                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Andrew Petto
                                  Yeah, so you could rotate the use of the divisions so that each plot is something else: different crops, different practices, and a couple of fallow plot were
                                  Message 16 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                    Yeah, so you could rotate the use of the divisions so that each plot is
                                    something else: different crops, different practices, and a couple of
                                    fallow plot were your experimental arch'y could go on.

                                    Are you in a location with a decent growing season that will overlap
                                    with classes?

                                    Anj

                                    On 9/16/2011 09:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Wow! That is a lot of thinking out loud.
                                    >
                                    > I have a couple of objectives with this potential project:
                                    >
                                    > 1. Get out courtyards to look less like abandoned city lots.
                                    >
                                    > 2. Get my students to learn something about anthropology through
                                    > hands-on learning.
                                    >
                                    > If I can find a diagram of what the layouts look like I will send them
                                    > to interested parties to make suggestions. Off the cuff I can tell you
                                    > that there are walkways dividing each courtyard into 3-4 plots that can
                                    > be used. I am only willing to take on the responsibility of one
                                    > courtyard.
                                    >
                                    > Thanks,
                                    >
                                    > Will
                                    >
                                    > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                                    > [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                                    > Behalf
                                    > Of Andrew Petto
                                    > Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:57 AM
                                    > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                                    > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening
                                    >
                                    > You could actually combine 1 & 2: do the horticultural bit, but then
                                    > treat is as an experimental archeology lab, too. Have students who have
                                    > not participated in the gardening try to infer the practices based on
                                    > the "data" that the gardeners left behind.
                                    >
                                    > How big is the area? Is there any chance that it will produce enough
                                    > produce for you to have a presence in your campus's "multicultural"
                                    > programming? Say, if you only grow plants indigenous to the region as
                                    > cultivated by the area's original inhabitants?
                                    >
                                    > As far as GMOs are concerned, there is one caveat: research into
                                    > genomics is blurring the genetic lines among species and lineages. Even
                                    > though we are jumping ahead in the line when we insert specific genes
                                    > into organisms to produce food or disease resistance, remember that this
                                    >
                                    > sort of genetic change is exactly what we are doing when we breed
                                    > organisms selectively for these traits; or graft plants; or produce
                                    > hybrid plants and animals; or treat these organisms with substances that
                                    >
                                    > alter the expression of genes ---- all standard, traditional,
                                    > "conservative" practices that have essentially the same results (think
                                    > of the "green revolution" in the mid 20th century that created more
                                    > productive grain crops by genetic alterations). Furthermore, each round
                                    > of infection by some bacterium or virus seems to leave traces inserted
                                    > into the genome in precisely the same way as GMO production does.
                                    >
                                    > I can see no essential difference in the intentions of the people doing
                                    > this; the only real question is whether the action may produce
                                    > unintended consequences (it almost certain does, since even the
                                    > "old-fashioned" way of changing the genome has these consequences) and
                                    > to what effect they are harmful (or more harmful doing it one way than
                                    > the other).
                                    >
                                    > The main issue is how rapidly the change appears and spreads through a
                                    > population. Of course, in GMOs we get the result we want (specific
                                    > differences in the genome) more quickly, but so far, the evidence is
                                    > that it spreads among native populations (during an accidental release)
                                    > in the same way and at about the same pace as other genetic changes. I
                                    > think good examples of how we might expect an accidentally released GMO
                                    > to change native populations can be found in the history of Gypsy moth
                                    > caterpillars and so-called "Africanized bees. And now there has been an
                                    > accidental release in Mexico (a few years back) of a GMO corn variety;
                                    > have not heard anything about that, so I suspect that dire warnings were
                                    >
                                    > not realized ... but will go back and try to find out.
                                    >
                                    > I think it is worth exploring the issue of people's reactions to GMO;
                                    > the best thing we can say about them is that there is insufficient
                                    > evidence to conclude and one might want to err on the side of
                                    > precaution. But---as with evolution and climate change---the real
                                    > objections seem to be sociocultural and political and not scientific. We
                                    >
                                    > are worried (with good cause) about hubris; we are concerned that these
                                    > actions are to anthropocentric and may cause harm to the environment
                                    > (but of course, there are lots of other things that we do that could not
                                    >
                                    > stand that sort of scrutiny); we worry that we are "playing God" and
                                    > acting immorally or unethically --- It's not nice to fool Mother
                                    > Nature!; and so on.
                                    >
                                    > I think a great case study here would be the so-called "Green
                                    > Revolution" beginning with Borlaug's work in the 40s. I would present
                                    > the issues of feeding the world, and the goal and the outcomes of the
                                    > research in the case, but without the technical details of how the
                                    > genetic change was brought about. Then ask students to gather data and
                                    > evidence to evaluate the appropriateness of that program.
                                    >
                                    > I think you will recognize a sea change in the attitudes toward this
                                    > sort of scientific manipulation (remember "Better living through
                                    > chemistry"?) in comparing the 40s-70s with the 80s-2000s about genetic
                                    > alteration in crops (and this reflects a technologic change more than a
                                    > change in the programs to alter the genes of organisms). You will also
                                    > probably find a deep divide in students' acceptance of the genetic
                                    > alteration between the more tradition (cross breeding) approach common
                                    > in the 40s compared to the DNA insertion/deletion/inactivation
                                    > techniques in the 80s and 90s (which, BTW, is also how we make a lot of
                                    > our vaccines!).
                                    >
                                    > Just thinking out loud!
                                    >
                                    > Anj
                                    >
                                    > On 9/16/2011 08:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > Hi Everyone,
                                    > >
                                    > > I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards
                                    > to
                                    > > use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become
                                    > overrun
                                    > > with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have
                                    > a
                                    > > meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                    > > spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.
                                    > >
                                    > > Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:
                                    > >
                                    > > 1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                    > > subsistence horticulture.
                                    > >
                                    > > 2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                    > > could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                    > > bury the artifacts in the spring.
                                    > >
                                    > > 3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                    > > more interesting.
                                    > >
                                    > > I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                    > > for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                    > > are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                    > > have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and
                                    > the
                                    > > courtyards will be open to the public.
                                    > >
                                    > > Thanks,
                                    > >
                                    > > Will
                                    > >
                                    > > William Hare
                                    > >
                                    > > Associate Professor of Anthropology
                                    > >
                                    > > Three Rivers Community College
                                    > >
                                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                    > --
                                    >
                                    > -----------------------------
                                    > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                                    > Senior Lecturer
                                    > Department of Biological Sciences
                                    > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                                    > PO Box 413
                                    > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                                    > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                                    > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                                    > FAX: 414-229-3926
                                    > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                                    >
                                    > *************
                                    > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                                    > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                                    > *************
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    >
                                    >

                                    --

                                    -----------------------------
                                    Andrew J Petto, PhD
                                    Senior Lecturer
                                    Department of Biological Sciences
                                    University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                                    PO Box 413
                                    Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                                    CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                                    Telephone: 414-229-6784
                                    FAX: 414-229-3926
                                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                                    *************
                                    Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                                    *************



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Laura Gonzalez
                                    Will, This is really exciting! To be given a space, and carte blanche.very cool! At my college, I developed a garden with raised beds (easier to take care of,
                                    Message 17 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                      Will,



                                      This is really exciting! To be given a space, and carte blanche.very cool!



                                      At my college, I developed a garden with raised beds (easier to take care
                                      of, amend soil, etc.). We use it as a community garden, in which different
                                      campus groups apply to care for a bed throughout the growing season. The
                                      Anthro bed is cared for by my Honors students, who are surprised to learn
                                      they will be turning compost as part of their Honors curriculum. In our
                                      current food and agricultural crisis, I can't think of a more appropriate
                                      thing for them to be doing!



                                      You might consider themed beds - a Three Sisters Garden (Southwest Indians -
                                      corn, beans and squash - there is a lot of literature on these); regional
                                      gardens, in which you showcase produce from different regions - and then you
                                      can water accordingly by bed, i.e. tropical regions require more water, arid
                                      regions require less; or heirloom fruit and vegetables. Any or all of these
                                      can be rich learning experiences.



                                      Get in touch with me off list of you want to chat more about gardens!



                                      Laura

                                      _____

                                      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                                      Hare II, William E
                                      Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 6:25 AM
                                      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening







                                      Hi Everyone,

                                      I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                                      use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                                      with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                                      meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                      spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.

                                      Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:

                                      1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                      subsistence horticulture.

                                      2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                      could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                      bury the artifacts in the spring.

                                      3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                      more interesting.

                                      I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                      for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                      are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                      have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                                      courtyards will be open to the public.

                                      Thanks,

                                      Will

                                      William Hare

                                      Associate Professor of Anthropology

                                      Three Rivers Community College

                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • dianne.chidester@gvltec.edu
                                      Here is a link to Gail Wagner s web page. She has been doing research about lack of interaction with the natural environment and her students have done some
                                      Message 18 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                        Here is a link to Gail Wagner's web page. She has been doing research
                                        about lack of interaction with the natural environment and her students
                                        have done some interesting research.



                                        http://www.cas.sc.edu/anth/Faculty/WAGNERG/Wagner.html





                                        Cheers!

                                        Dianne



                                        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                                        Of Laura Gonzalez
                                        Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 10:37 AM
                                        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: RE: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening





                                        Will,

                                        This is really exciting! To be given a space, and carte blanche.very
                                        cool!

                                        At my college, I developed a garden with raised beds (easier to take
                                        care
                                        of, amend soil, etc.). We use it as a community garden, in which
                                        different
                                        campus groups apply to care for a bed throughout the growing season. The
                                        Anthro bed is cared for by my Honors students, who are surprised to
                                        learn
                                        they will be turning compost as part of their Honors curriculum. In our
                                        current food and agricultural crisis, I can't think of a more
                                        appropriate
                                        thing for them to be doing!

                                        You might consider themed beds - a Three Sisters Garden (Southwest
                                        Indians -
                                        corn, beans and squash - there is a lot of literature on these);
                                        regional
                                        gardens, in which you showcase produce from different regions - and then
                                        you
                                        can water accordingly by bed, i.e. tropical regions require more water,
                                        arid
                                        regions require less; or heirloom fruit and vegetables. Any or all of
                                        these
                                        can be rich learning experiences.

                                        Get in touch with me off list of you want to chat more about gardens!

                                        Laura

                                        _____

                                        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:
                                        SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of
                                        Hare II, William E
                                        Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 6:25 AM
                                        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                                        Subject: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening

                                        Hi Everyone,

                                        I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's courtyards to
                                        use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become overrun
                                        with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I have a
                                        meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                        spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.

                                        Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:

                                        1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                        subsistence horticulture.

                                        2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                        could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                        bury the artifacts in the spring.

                                        3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                        more interesting.

                                        I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                        for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                        are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                        have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and the
                                        courtyards will be open to the public.

                                        Thanks,

                                        Will

                                        William Hare

                                        Associate Professor of Anthropology

                                        Three Rivers Community College

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                                        ----------

                                        This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.


                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Ann Bragdon
                                        Check out the Urban Harvest program site. http://www.urbanharvest.org/ The program was initiated by an anthropologist (Bob Randall) a number of years ago here
                                        Message 19 of 25 , Sep 16, 2011
                                          Check out the Urban Harvest program site.
                                          http://www.urbanharvest.org/

                                          The program was initiated by an anthropologist (Bob Randall) a number
                                          of years ago here in Houston. It has grown and grown.. and as Laura
                                          says, this
                                          really is an important movement to encourage!

                                          There are over 100 community gardens, numerous farmers markets every
                                          week, classes for gardeners, etc. It is great.

                                          (We grow lots of fruit / vegetables in our small city garden.
                                          However, I love the idea of a native american garden.. )

                                          ann


                                          On Sep 16, 2011, at 9:36 AM, Laura Gonzalez wrote:

                                          > Will,
                                          >
                                          > This is really exciting! To be given a space, and carte blanche.very
                                          > cool!
                                          >
                                          > At my college, I developed a garden with raised beds (easier to take
                                          > care
                                          > of, amend soil, etc.). We use it as a community garden, in which
                                          > different
                                          > campus groups apply to care for a bed throughout the growing season.
                                          > The
                                          > Anthro bed is cared for by my Honors students, who are surprised to
                                          > learn
                                          > they will be turning compost as part of their Honors curriculum. In
                                          > our
                                          > current food and agricultural crisis, I can't think of a more
                                          > appropriate
                                          > thing for them to be doing!
                                          >
                                          > You might consider themed beds - a Three Sisters Garden (Southwest
                                          > Indians -
                                          > corn, beans and squash - there is a lot of literature on these);
                                          > regional
                                          > gardens, in which you showcase produce from different regions - and
                                          > then you
                                          > can water accordingly by bed, i.e. tropical regions require more
                                          > water, arid
                                          > regions require less; or heirloom fruit and vegetables. Any or all
                                          > of these
                                          > can be rich learning experiences.
                                          >
                                          > Get in touch with me off list of you want to chat more about gardens!
                                          >
                                          > Laura
                                          >
                                          > _____
                                          >
                                          > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On
                                          > Behalf Of
                                          > Hare II, William E
                                          > Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 6:25 AM
                                          > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                                          > Subject: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening
                                          >
                                          > Hi Everyone,
                                          >
                                          > I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's
                                          > courtyards to
                                          > use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become
                                          > overrun
                                          > with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I
                                          > have a
                                          > meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                          > spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.
                                          >
                                          > Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:
                                          >
                                          > 1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                          > subsistence horticulture.
                                          >
                                          > 2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                          > could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create and
                                          > bury the artifacts in the spring.
                                          >
                                          > 3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                          > more interesting.
                                          >
                                          > I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't know
                                          > for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but they
                                          > are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                          > have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and
                                          > the
                                          > courtyards will be open to the public.
                                          >
                                          > Thanks,
                                          >
                                          > Will
                                          >
                                          > William Hare
                                          >
                                          > Associate Professor of Anthropology
                                          >
                                          > Three Rivers Community College
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                          >



                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • Anthropmor
                                          there are many things you could do- I love Anjs experimental plot- - although clearing it could be actual excavation. There are many styles of garden that
                                          Message 20 of 25 , Sep 17, 2011
                                            there are many things you could do- I love Anjs' experimental plot- -
                                            although clearing it could be actual excavation.
                                            There are many styles of garden that could be done- Pacific Taro
                                            plot, manioc, multiple Bolivian potatos, Medieval Monks Herb, - check
                                            out Tom Turners "Garden History" book for many idea and ways to lay out
                                            the plots.
                                            Mike Pavlik

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            From: Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...>
                                            To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                                            Sent: Fri, Sep 16, 2011 9:35 am
                                            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening




                                            Yeah, so you could rotate the use of the divisions so that each plot is
                                            something else: different crops, different practices, and a couple of
                                            fallow plot were your experimental arch'y could go on.

                                            Are you in a location with a decent growing season that will overlap
                                            with classes?

                                            Anj

                                            On 9/16/2011 09:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Wow! That is a lot of thinking out loud.
                                            >
                                            > I have a couple of objectives with this potential project:
                                            >
                                            > 1. Get out courtyards to look less like abandoned city lots.
                                            >
                                            > 2. Get my students to learn something about anthropology through
                                            > hands-on learning.
                                            >
                                            > If I can find a diagram of what the layouts look like I will send them
                                            > to interested parties to make suggestions. Off the cuff I can tell you
                                            > that there are walkways dividing each courtyard into 3-4 plots that
                                            can
                                            > be used. I am only willing to take on the responsibility of one
                                            > courtyard.
                                            >
                                            > Thanks,
                                            >
                                            > Will
                                            >
                                            > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                            > [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>;] On
                                            > Behalf
                                            > Of Andrew Petto
                                            > Sent: Friday, September 16, 2011 9:57 AM
                                            > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>;
                                            > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] anthropological gardening
                                            >
                                            > You could actually combine 1 & 2: do the horticultural bit, but then
                                            > treat is as an experimental archeology lab, too. Have students who
                                            have
                                            > not participated in the gardening try to infer the practices based on
                                            > the "data" that the gardeners left behind.
                                            >
                                            > How big is the area? Is there any chance that it will produce enough
                                            > produce for you to have a presence in your campus's "multicultural"
                                            > programming? Say, if you only grow plants indigenous to the region as
                                            > cultivated by the area's original inhabitants?
                                            >
                                            > As far as GMOs are concerned, there is one caveat: research into
                                            > genomics is blurring the genetic lines among species and lineages.
                                            Even
                                            > though we are jumping ahead in the line when we insert specific genes
                                            > into organisms to produce food or disease resistance, remember that
                                            this
                                            >
                                            > sort of genetic change is exactly what we are doing when we breed
                                            > organisms selectively for these traits; or graft plants; or produce
                                            > hybrid plants and animals; or treat these organisms with substances
                                            that
                                            >
                                            > alter the expression of genes ---- all standard, traditional,
                                            > "conservative" practices that have essentially the same results (think
                                            > of the "green revolution" in the mid 20th century that created more
                                            > productive grain crops by genetic alterations). Furthermore, each
                                            round
                                            > of infection by some bacterium or virus seems to leave traces inserted
                                            > into the genome in precisely the same way as GMO production does.
                                            >
                                            > I can see no essential difference in the intentions of the people
                                            doing
                                            > this; the only real question is whether the action may produce
                                            > unintended consequences (it almost certain does, since even the
                                            > "old-fashioned" way of changing the genome has these consequences) and
                                            > to what effect they are harmful (or more harmful doing it one way than
                                            > the other).
                                            >
                                            > The main issue is how rapidly the change appears and spreads through a
                                            > population. Of course, in GMOs we get the result we want (specific
                                            > differences in the genome) more quickly, but so far, the evidence is
                                            > that it spreads among native populations (during an accidental
                                            release)
                                            > in the same way and at about the same pace as other genetic changes. I
                                            > think good examples of how we might expect an accidentally released
                                            GMO
                                            > to change native populations can be found in the history of Gypsy moth
                                            > caterpillars and so-called "Africanized bees. And now there has been
                                            an
                                            > accidental release in Mexico (a few years back) of a GMO corn variety;
                                            > have not heard anything about that, so I suspect that dire warnings
                                            were
                                            >
                                            > not realized ... but will go back and try to find out.
                                            >
                                            > I think it is worth exploring the issue of people's reactions to GMO;
                                            > the best thing we can say about them is that there is insufficient
                                            > evidence to conclude and one might want to err on the side of
                                            > precaution. But---as with evolution and climate change---the real
                                            > objections seem to be sociocultural and political and not scientific.
                                            We
                                            >
                                            > are worried (with good cause) about hubris; we are concerned that
                                            these
                                            > actions are to anthropocentric and may cause harm to the environment
                                            > (but of course, there are lots of other things that we do that could
                                            not
                                            >
                                            > stand that sort of scrutiny); we worry that we are "playing God" and
                                            > acting immorally or unethically --- It's not nice to fool Mother
                                            > Nature!; and so on.
                                            >
                                            > I think a great case study here would be the so-called "Green
                                            > Revolution" beginning with Borlaug's work in the 40s. I would present
                                            > the issues of feeding the world, and the goal and the outcomes of the
                                            > research in the case, but without the technical details of how the
                                            > genetic change was brought about. Then ask students to gather data and
                                            > evidence to evaluate the appropriateness of that program.
                                            >
                                            > I think you will recognize a sea change in the attitudes toward this
                                            > sort of scientific manipulation (remember "Better living through
                                            > chemistry"?) in comparing the 40s-70s with the 80s-2000s about genetic
                                            > alteration in crops (and this reflects a technologic change more than
                                            a
                                            > change in the programs to alter the genes of organisms). You will also
                                            > probably find a deep divide in students' acceptance of the genetic
                                            > alteration between the more tradition (cross breeding) approach common
                                            > in the 40s compared to the DNA insertion/deletion/inactivation
                                            > techniques in the 80s and 90s (which, BTW, is also how we make a lot
                                            of
                                            > our vaccines!).
                                            >
                                            > Just thinking out loud!
                                            >
                                            > Anj
                                            >
                                            > On 9/16/2011 08:24, Hare II, William E wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > Hi Everyone,
                                            > >
                                            > > I have potential opportunity to adopt one of our college's
                                            courtyards
                                            > to
                                            > > use as a sort of anthropology lab space. The spaces have become
                                            > overrun
                                            > > with weeds due to our woefully short-handed maintenance staff. I
                                            have
                                            > a
                                            > > meeting with the "powers that be" to brainstorm how we can make the
                                            > > spaces attractive but also more useful for educational purposes.
                                            > >
                                            > > Here are a couple of ideas that I have come up with:
                                            > >
                                            > > 1. Create sustainable gardens that students work in to learn about
                                            > > subsistence horticulture.
                                            > >
                                            > > 2. Create an archaeological site that my Intro to Anth students
                                            > > could excavate each fall. The Intro to Cultural Anth would create
                                            and
                                            > > bury the artifacts in the spring.
                                            > >
                                            > > 3. Create gardens of heirloom varieties to make lessons about GMOs
                                            > > more interesting.
                                            > >
                                            > > I welcome any other suggestions or advice you might have. I don't
                                            know
                                            > > for sure how much the administration will actually let me do, but
                                            they
                                            > > are at least open to discussion. One caveat is that the courtyards
                                            > > have permanent tables and chairs installed throughout the space and
                                            > the
                                            > > courtyards will be open to the public.
                                            > >
                                            > > Thanks,
                                            > >
                                            > > Will
                                            > >
                                            > > William Hare
                                            > >
                                            > > Associate Professor of Anthropology
                                            > >
                                            > > Three Rivers Community College
                                            > >
                                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            >
                                            > --
                                            >
                                            > -----------------------------
                                            > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                                            > Senior Lecturer
                                            > Department of Biological Sciences
                                            > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                                            > PO Box 413
                                            > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                                            > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                                            > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                                            > FAX: 414-229-3926
                                            > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                                            >
                                            > *************
                                            > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and
                                            Creationism.
                                            > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                                            > *************
                                            >
                                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            >
                                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            >
                                            >

                                            --

                                            -----------------------------
                                            Andrew J Petto, PhD
                                            Senior Lecturer
                                            Department of Biological Sciences
                                            University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                                            PO Box 413
                                            Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                                            CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                                            Telephone: 414-229-6784
                                            FAX: 414-229-3926
                                            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                                            *************
                                            Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                                            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                                            *************

                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Frank Lagana
                                            Some sort of composting would be a nice addition to your plot (assuming the administration doesn t object). Have students bring in their food waste and they
                                            Message 21 of 25 , Sep 17, 2011
                                              Some sort of composting would be a nice addition to your plot (assuming the administration doesn't object). Have students bring in their food waste and they can see it being transformed into good old dirt.

                                              Frank

                                              Sent from my iPhone
                                            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.