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RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts

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  • Deborah Shepherd
    Sorry I didn t see the link problem. I ve just used bit.ly to shorten the link adequately. This should get you to the article. Try: http://bit.ly/qEktfT
    Message 1 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Sorry I didn't see the link problem.



      I've just used bit.ly to shorten the link adequately. This should get you to
      the article. Try:



      http://bit.ly/qEktfT



      Deborah



      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      dianne.chidester@...
      Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 2:13 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts





      Here's the link:

      http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-colle
      ge-system-adjunction.html

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
      [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
      Of Deborah Shepherd
      Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:24 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts

      My former union sent this link out via Twitter:

      http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-colle
      ge-s
      ystem-adjunction.html

      Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of
      adjuncts
      as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty.
      Since
      when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the
      field"
      teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
      adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
      level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two
      courses
      a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying
      job, I
      suppose.

      I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
      community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough
      to
      react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a
      vast
      pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."

      Deborah

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Deborah Shepherd
      It’s obviously a contradictory rationale, too. At the same time that Administration is telling us that working professionals can do a better job of teaching
      Message 2 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        It’s obviously a contradictory rationale, too. At the same time that Administration is telling us that working professionals can do a better job of teaching their fields, full-time faculty are being pressed into growing amounts of professional development on the assumption that all their training isn’t enough to teach them how to teach adequately.





        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew J Petto
        Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 12:31 PM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts





        We saw this rationale in Wisconsin in the Technical College System. The idea was that the instructors were licensed/certified/credentialed professionals who had a history of practice in the field. The adjuncts (like me) were the academics whose job it was to teach the students other things than the specific skills set to do a particular job.

        So, the rationale is that, for a practical education, what is better than being taught by practicing professionals?

        Of course, the answer is: being taught by someone who (a) knows how to teach students; and (b) has a broader perspective on the contexts in which skills sets can be applied.

        I don't condone the rationale, just 'plainin' it.

        Anj

        ------------
        Andrew J Petto, PhD
        Senior Lecturer
        Department of Biological Sciences
        University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
        PO Box 413
        Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
        CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
        Telephone: 414-229-6784
        FAX: 414-229-3926
        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

        *************
        Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
        *************

        "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

        -- Pat Conroy
        The Prince of Tides

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Deborah Shepherd" <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 12:23:45 PM
        Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts

        My former union sent this link out via Twitter:

        http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
        ystem-adjunction.html

        Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
        as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
        when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
        teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
        adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
        level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
        a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
        suppose.

        I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
        community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
        react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
        pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."

        Deborah

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Deborah Shepherd
        I’ve been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I’ve heard is that two
        Message 3 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          I’ve been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I’ve heard is that two VA nuclear power plants were shut down.







          From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
          Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:22 PM
          To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts





          I was drafting something about this article but we just had an earthquake!!!!

          Nikki

          >________________________________
          >From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
          >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:23 PM
          >Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
          >
          >
          >
          >My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
          >
          >http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
          >ystem-adjunction.html
          >
          >Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
          >as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
          >when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
          >teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
          >adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
          >level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
          >a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
          >suppose.
          >
          >I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
          >community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
          >react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
          >pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
          >
          >Deborah
          >
          >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nikki Ives
          It was pretty strong here - the office shook for a good 20 seconds. It reminded me of Japan - except nobody knew what to do!  We evacuated the building and
          Message 4 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            It was pretty strong here - the office shook for a good 20 seconds. It reminded me of Japan - except nobody knew what to do!  We evacuated the building and then milled around outside trying to figure out what is going on for half an hour before campus police told us they were closing the school.  Phones weren't working for a while.  Traffic was horrible getting home.  Metro is running at 15 miles/hr and they evacuated all the monuments, museums, the Pentagon, Capital, etc. downtown. Most things seem to be opening back up but everyone decided to go home at the same time so now there is gridlock.  Something (a spire? is that what it is called?) fell off the National Cathedral and apparently a roof caved in at a Best Buy in DC but overall, very little damage - just a bunch of freaked out people!

            We're at home now taking advantage of the afternoon off.




            >________________________________
            >From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@...>
            >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 3:25 PM
            >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
            >
            >

            >I’ve been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I’ve heard is that two VA nuclear power plants were shut down.
            >
            >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
            >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:22 PM
            >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
            >
            >I was drafting something about this article but we just had an earthquake!!!!
            >
            >Nikki
            >
            >>________________________________
            >>From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
            >>To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
            >>Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:23 PM
            >>Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
            >>
            >>http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
            >>ystem-adjunction.html
            >>
            >>Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
            >>as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
            >>when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
            >>teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
            >>adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
            >>level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
            >>a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
            >>suppose.
            >>
            >>I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
            >>community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
            >>react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
            >>pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
            >>
            >>Deborah
            >>
            >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >>
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Deborah Shepherd
            I haven t gotten SACC-L messages for a while. I wonder if the earthquake has been slowing down communications. I can find the page at:
            Message 5 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              I haven't gotten SACC-L messages for a while. I wonder if the earthquake has
              been slowing down communications.



              I can find the page at:



              http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821m
              aricopa-college-system-adjunction.html



              Or you can try using this link:




              <http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821
              maricopa-college-system-adjunction.html#ixzz1VsrQrT59>
              http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821m
              aricopa-college-system-adjunction.html#ixzz1VsrQrT59



              Copy and paste the whole link because SACC-L will butcher it.





              Here's is the text of the article:



              For the 140,000 students who are taking community-college classes this fall,
              chances are good that the person at the front of the room is a part-time
              teacher rather than a full-time professor.

              The proportion of part-time, or adjunct, faculty at the Maricopa
              <http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821
              maricopa-college-system-adjunction.html> Community
              Collegeshttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/mag-glass_10x10.gif has
              increased steadily over the last five years and this semester will likely
              surpass the 82 percent reached in the 2010-11 school year, district
              officials say. Part-time teachers made up 73 percent of the total in
              2006-07.

              The 6,236 adjuncts taught about two-thirds of the courses offered at the 10
              colleges last year. There were 1,340 full-time teachers, or residential
              faculty.
              <http://gannett.gcion.com/adlink/5111/328602/0/170/AdId=1672390;BnId=3;itime
              =129328988;nodecode=yes;link=http:/a.collective-media.net/jump/q1.q.gc.8488/
              be_news;sz=300x250;ord=129328988?>
              http://a.collective-media.net/ad/q1.q.gc.8488/be_news;sz=300x250;ord=1293289
              88?

              The reliance on part-time faculty reflects two trends, said Maria
              Harper-Marinick, executive vice chancellor and provost of the system.

              - Workforce training is a main goal of the colleges, and hiring faculty who
              have current expertise in the field is crucial to properly train potential
              workers. Health care and firefighting are two areas in which it's important
              to have teachers who are immersed in the field every day.

              "These are people in the profession and that's part of the richness of the
              knowledge they bring to the students," Harper-Marinick said.

              Phillip Jalowiec, president of the Adjunct Faculty Association, teaches
              systems analysis and software at Chandler-Gilbert and Paradise Valley
              colleges, and also is a consulting system analyst. He said adjuncts served a
              key link between the business community and the colleges.

              "We're the ambassadors," he said. "In many cases, the students don't know
              the difference between us and the residential faculty."

              - Part-time faculty cost less. Decreases in state funding and double-digit
              increases in enrollment the last two years mean less money for full-time
              faculty.

              The adjuncts are paid $813 per credit - or $2,439 for teaching one
              three-credit class. Most teach two or three per semester. They get no
              health-insurance benefits but are eligible for tuition waivers and
              professional-development courses.

              Besides teaching at least five classes, full-time faculty must devote
              significant hours to activities such as committees, curriculum development
              or sponsoring student clubs or activities.

              Market drivers

              Maricopa is one of the largest community-college districts in the country,
              but it must be nimble enough to react quickly to economic trends,
              Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast pool of part-time faculty with
              short-term contracts allows that.

              When the economy was booming, enrollment dipped and fewer teachers were
              needed. When the recession hit, enrollment soared with "people coming back
              for job retraining" and, to a larger extent, new high-school graduates, she
              said.

              Big tuition increases at four-year universities have been driving many new
              graduates to community colleges, where they take courses and later transfer,
              Harper-Marinick said. So the colleges have hired huge numbers of part-time
              faculty to teach general-education classes such as English, math and
              business.

              Maricopa's number of adjunct faculty is a bit higher than at other big
              institutions: 76 percent at the 28-college Florida system, and 70 percent in
              the California Community Colleges system.

              Minimum qualifications are identical for adjunct and residential faculty,
              with most positions requiring a
              <http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821
              maricopa-college-system-adjunction.html> master's
              degreehttp://images.intellitxt.com/ast/adTypes/mag-glass_10x10.gif.

              Adjuncts' issues

              As its numbers have grown, the Adjunct Faculty Association has prodded the
              district to make its policies on adjuncts more uniform.

              One challenge is that adjuncts are hired by department heads at each of the
              individual colleges, which maintain great independence. Some pay part-time
              faculty to attend professional development and some don't, Jalowiec said,
              and each college has a different evaluation system.

              Even contacting all adjunct faculty has been tricky because there are
              multiple e-mail systems - a problem that is being addressed as part of the
              district's initiative to ease transition among the colleges.

              One of the main issues for part-time faculty is when their jobs begin.
              Adjuncts' contracts say they begin their employment on the first day of
              class and end it when final grades are handed in.

              Michael Powell, who teaches economics and government at Estrella Mountain
              Community College in Avondale, said that policy was unrealistic, as the
              teachers must prepare and gather materials before the first day of class.
              Adjuncts attend meetings, use district e-mail and have access to student
              information before the semester begins.

              Harper-Marinick said the district had been meeting with the association on
              several issues.

              "We listen to them and we try to find a way to makes things work," she said.
              "It's a big system with a lot of politics and people."

              Jalowiec believes the adjuncts are uniquely suited to contribute to
              Maricopa's initiative to grow the numbers of students who earn a degree or
              certificate or transfer to a university.

              "Adjuncts don't have a vested interest in the system and how it works," he
              said. "Day to day, students are our only focus."


              Read more:
              <http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821
              maricopa-college-system-adjunction.html#ixzz1VsrQrT59>
              http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2011/08/21/20110821m
              aricopa-college-system-adjunction.html#ixzz1VsrQrT59









              From: kent morris [mailto:km52@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 2:44 PM
              To: Deborah Shepherd
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts



              page still not found...

              On Aug 23, 2011, at 12:28 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:





              Arrgh. I just sent THIS!...



              Sorry I didn't see the link problem.



              I've just used bit.ly to shorten the link adequately. This should get you to
              the article. Try:



              <http://bit.ly/qEktfT> http://bit.ly/qEktfT



              Deborah





              From: Deborah Shepherd [mailto:ShephDJ@...]
              Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 2:28 PM
              To: 'kent morris'
              Subject: FW: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts



              I just sent this to the list, but it isn't showing up (yet).



              From: <mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com> SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of kent morris
              Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 12:42 PM
              To: <mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com> SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts





              bad link...
              On Aug 23, 2011, at 10:23 AM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

              > My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
              >
              >
              <http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-
              s>
              http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
              > ystem-adjunction.html
              >
              >
              >
              > Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of
              adjuncts
              > as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
              > when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
              > teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
              > adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
              > level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two
              courses
              > a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job,
              I
              > suppose.
              >
              >
              >
              > I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
              > community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough
              to
              > react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
              > pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
              >
              >
              >
              > Deborah
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Find out more at our web site <http://saccweb.net/> http://saccweb.net/
              Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Lloyd Miller
              It s always been a puzzlement to me why so many people seem to both envy and resent academics, buying into the all-too-popular saying, Those who can, do;
              Message 6 of 18 , Aug 23, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                It's always been a puzzlement to me why so many people seem to both envy and resent academics, buying into the all-too-popular saying, "Those who can, do; those who can't, teach." Throughout my community college career, administrators would embrace enthusiastically each new educational fad with accompanying technology that promised to "Get the boring prof, the talking head, off center stage." Audio-tutorial cassette tapes, behavioral objectives, TV courses�I discussed them all in a commentary titled, "Beware the Wave of the Future" (AAA's Anthropology News Dialogue, May 2001).

                That aside, I think I know where the rationale Anj cites might have originated. During the eight years I was administrative director of the Dept. of Social and Behavioral Sciences at my college (1974-82), in addition to the academic fields, my department included a number of "para-professional" programs that offered two-year associate degrees (Human Services, Criminal Justice, Paralegal Studies, Labor Studies and Teacher Education were some of them). The chair of each program was usually someone with practical experience in the field but also with appropriate academic and educational training (e.g., a social worker with advanced degrees and teaching experience; a lawyer with both courtroom and teaching experience, etc.). Program chairs were responsible for coordinating and supervising all aspects of the programs�both in the classroom and in field internships, as well as teaching core program courses.

                However, since no one, academic or practitioner, could be qualified to teach all the specialty program courses, practitioners were hired as adjuncts to teach their specialties: a criminalist from the State Crime Lab to teach Physiological Fluids and Fibers, a pharmacologist from the College of Pharmacy of a nearby university to teach about drugs and their uses, a practicing lawyer to teach Courtroom Procedures, and so on. When it worked as it was supposed to work (and it didn't always), the program chairs supervised the adjuncts' teaching duties (in some cases even did the evaluation and grading, so that the adjuncts basically gave lectures and held discussions with students), and provided the broader perspectives and synthesizing of materials. The adjuncts contributed their specialized knowledge.

                Most of the specialist adjuncts loved the one or two courses they taught each semester. It was a break from their full-time jobs. They enjoyed interacting with students and felt that they were making important contributions, though none that I knew of ever would have considered becoming a full-time academic. A good friend of mine during that era, a public defender, adored teaching and often told me how lucky I was to be in that profession. She put a lot of work into the one or two courses she taught in the Criminal Justice Program, yet she was equally passionate about her job. I figured that the students were often inspired by instructors like her who both loved their jobs and loved to teach.

                Of course, the rationales that Maricopa and Wisc Tech College present are a mistaken interpretation of the para-professional model. Or maybe they're not mistaken, but rather are purposeful con jobs to get rid of those smarty pants, effete intellectuals...

                Lloyd


                On Aug 23, 2011, at 2:22 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

                > It�s obviously a contradictory rationale, too. At the same time that Administration is telling us that working professionals can do a better job of teaching their fields, full-time faculty are being pressed into growing amounts of professional development on the assumption that all their training isn�t enough to teach them how to teach adequately.
                >
                > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Andrew J Petto
                > Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 12:31 PM
                > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                >
                > We saw this rationale in Wisconsin in the Technical College System. The idea was that the instructors were licensed/certified/credentialed professionals who had a history of practice in the field. The adjuncts (like me) were the academics whose job it was to teach the students other things than the specific skills set to do a particular job.
                >
                > So, the rationale is that, for a practical education, what is better than being taught by practicing professionals?
                >
                > Of course, the answer is: being taught by someone who (a) knows how to teach students; and (b) has a broader perspective on the contexts in which skills sets can be applied.
                >
                > I don't condone the rationale, just 'plainin' it.
                >
                > Anj
                >
                > ------------
                > Andrew J Petto, PhD
                > Senior Lecturer
                > Department of Biological Sciences
                > University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                > PO Box 413
                > Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                > CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                > Telephone: 414-229-6784
                > FAX: 414-229-3926
                > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
                >
                > *************
                > Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                > https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                > *************
                >
                > "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."
                >
                > -- Pat Conroy
                > The Prince of Tides
                >
                > ----- Original Message -----
                > From: "Deborah Shepherd" <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
                > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                > Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 12:23:45 PM
                > Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                >
                > My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
                >
                > http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
                > ystem-adjunction.html
                >
                > Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
                > as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
                > when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
                > teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
                > adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
                > level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
                > a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
                > suppose.
                >
                > I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
                > community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
                > react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
                > pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
                >
                > Deborah
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kaupp, Ann
                What an experience! I was talking to someone in western Maryland when the earthquake hit. The ole museum shook, my file cabinets knocked against each other and
                Message 7 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                • 0 Attachment
                  What an experience! I was talking to someone in western Maryland when the earthquake hit. The ole museum shook, my file cabinets knocked against each other and ceiling lights swayed. All the buildings evacuated. I soon got on the subway, which thankfully was running, and got a seat as I left before the big rush. The trains were going only 15 miles an hour. I took the route that travels above the river. The Smithsonian Castle and the support center in Maryland are closed until further notice. Ann


                  From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                  Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 4:08 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Earthquake in DC



                  It was pretty strong here - the office shook for a good 20 seconds. It reminded me of Japan - except nobody knew what to do! We evacuated the building and then milled around outside trying to figure out what is going on for half an hour before campus police told us they were closing the school. Phones weren't working for a while. Traffic was horrible getting home. Metro is running at 15 miles/hr and they evacuated all the monuments, museums, the Pentagon, Capital, etc. downtown. Most things seem to be opening back up but everyone decided to go home at the same time so now there is gridlock. Something (a spire? is that what it is called?) fell off the National Cathedral and apparently a roof caved in at a Best Buy in DC but overall, very little damage - just a bunch of freaked out people!

                  We're at home now taking advantage of the afternoon off.

                  >________________________________
                  >From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@...<mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com>>
                  >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                  >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 3:25 PM
                  >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >I’ve been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I’ve heard is that two VA nuclear power plants were shut down.
                  >
                  >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                  >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:22 PM
                  >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                  >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                  >
                  >I was drafting something about this article but we just had an earthquake!!!!
                  >
                  >Nikki
                  >
                  >>________________________________
                  >>From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@...<mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
                  >>To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                  >>Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:23 PM
                  >>Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
                  >>
                  >>http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
                  >>ystem-adjunction.html
                  >>
                  >>Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
                  >>as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
                  >>when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
                  >>teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
                  >>adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
                  >>level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
                  >>a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
                  >>suppose.
                  >>
                  >>I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
                  >>community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
                  >>react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
                  >>pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
                  >>
                  >>Deborah
                  >>
                  >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >>
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Laura Gonzalez
                  You have now been initiated into the Earthquake Club. Welcome! Laura _____ From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kaupp, Ann
                  Message 8 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                  • 0 Attachment
                    You have now been initiated into the Earthquake Club. Welcome!



                    Laura



                    _____

                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                    Kaupp, Ann
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 6:41 AM
                    To: 'SACC-L@yahoogroups.com'
                    Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Earthquake in DC






                    What an experience! I was talking to someone in western Maryland when the
                    earthquake hit. The ole museum shook, my file cabinets knocked against each
                    other and ceiling lights swayed. All the buildings evacuated. I soon got on
                    the subway, which thankfully was running, and got a seat as I left before
                    the big rush. The trains were going only 15 miles an hour. I took the route
                    that travels above the river. The Smithsonian Castle and the support center
                    in Maryland are closed until further notice. Ann


                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf
                    Of Nikki Ives
                    Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 4:08 PM
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Earthquake in DC



                    It was pretty strong here - the office shook for a good 20 seconds. It
                    reminded me of Japan - except nobody knew what to do! We evacuated the
                    building and then milled around outside trying to figure out what is going
                    on for half an hour before campus police told us they were closing the
                    school. Phones weren't working for a while. Traffic was horrible getting
                    home. Metro is running at 15 miles/hr and they evacuated all the monuments,
                    museums, the Pentagon, Capital, etc. downtown. Most things seem to be
                    opening back up but everyone decided to go home at the same time so now
                    there is gridlock. Something (a spire? is that what it is called?) fell off
                    the National Cathedral and apparently a roof caved in at a Best Buy in DC
                    but overall, very little damage - just a bunch of freaked out people!

                    We're at home now taking advantage of the afternoon off.

                    >________________________________
                    >From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com>
                    <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com>>
                    >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 3:25 PM
                    >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >I've been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the
                    aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I've heard is that
                    two VA nuclear power plants were shut down.
                    >
                    >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On
                    Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                    >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:22 PM
                    >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                    >
                    >I was drafting something about this article but we just had an
                    earthquake!!!!
                    >
                    >Nikki
                    >
                    >>________________________________
                    >>From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com>
                    <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
                    >>To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                    >>Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:23 PM
                    >>Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
                    >>
                    >>http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college
                    -s
                    >>ystem-adjunction.html
                    >>
                    >>Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of
                    adjuncts
                    >>as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
                    >>when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
                    >>teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
                    >>adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
                    >>level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two
                    courses
                    >>a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job,
                    I
                    >>suppose.
                    >>
                    >>I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
                    >>community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough
                    to
                    >>react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
                    >>pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
                    >>
                    >>Deborah
                    >>
                    >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >>
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Andrew Petto
                    From my old colleague Leon Lane who was active in the late 90s on TCC-L (teaching in community colleges listserver) which later became UCC-L (Uncensored
                    Message 9 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                    • 0 Attachment
                      From my old colleague Leon Lane who was active in the late 90s on TCC-L
                      (teaching in community colleges listserver) which later became UCC-L
                      (Uncensored Community College listserver) after someone at the hosting
                      institution took umbrage at the criticism by instructors of the ways in
                      general that CCs were going:

                      Those who can, teach; Those who can't teach, shouldn't.

                      Anj


                      --

                      -----------------------------
                      Andrew J Petto, PhD
                      Senior Lecturer
                      Department of Biological Sciences
                      University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                      PO Box 413
                      Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                      CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                      Telephone: 414-229-6784
                      FAX: 414-229-3926
                      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                      *************
                      Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                      *************



                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Andrew Petto
                      As Lloyd underscores, this Explanation is a *rationale* --- which we all know is a justification for the way things are or the way we would lie them to be.
                      Message 10 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                      • 0 Attachment
                        As Lloyd underscores, this "Explanation" is a *rationale* --- which we
                        all know is a justification for the way things are or the way we would
                        lie them to be.

                        Back in the day, the WI Tech System recognized the problem and required
                        that all its instructors complete a minimum 5-course training program on
                        how to teach (although most of the required courses were administrative,
                        there were a couple that really did address helping students to learn,
                        and some of the best information I had about teaching was in those).
                        These courses were minimal, but when you think about it, most academics
                        get even less than this.

                        The one thing I liked about the WTCS was that even academics had to show
                        non-academic experience in their fields (that is, more than just
                        teaching about it). But sometimes, it was a stretch, and it was just
                        another hoop to jump through. Never mind that I had a doctorate studying
                        comparative biology of primates with a post-doc at Harvard Medical
                        School; it was the 2 years that I served as an EMT and emergency room
                        technician before graduate school that met the requirement (some 20
                        years earlier). Go figure! How much could a field have changed in 20
                        years? Well, in the case of emergency medicine, a whole lot between 1977
                        and 1995. Certainly my academic work was more relevant for what I needed
                        to teach (general zoology) than my work as a serf in an ED back in the
                        70s. (Oops, that was back when ED meant "emergency department" and was
                        not an acronym for a condition requiring viagra).*

                        So, like most administrative requirements of this type, it fit the
                        rationale, but was a headache for both administrators and instructors.

                        Anj

                        *Fun fact: Viagra works by inhibiting the breakdown of cyclic GMP,
                        resulting in persistance of muscle action in the vasoconstrictors of the
                        corpora cavernosa and prevents or greatly slows the re-entry of blood
                        into the general circulation. In order for the optic nerve to receive
                        signals from the retina and create vision, light causes a chemical
                        change in the pigment compounds in the retina which CAUSES the breakdown
                        of cyclic GMP. So, no break-down of cGMP, no vision. And that is why
                        Viagra will make guys go blind (temporarily).

                        -----------------------------
                        Andrew J Petto, PhD
                        Senior Lecturer
                        Department of Biological Sciences
                        University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                        PO Box 413
                        Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                        CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                        Telephone: 414-229-6784
                        FAX: 414-229-3926
                        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                        *************
                        Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                        *************



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Lloyd Miller
                        Great! I like this one much better. Lloyd ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        Message 11 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Great! I like this one much better.
                          Lloyd


                          On Aug 24, 2011, at 9:17 AM, Andrew Petto wrote:

                          > From my old colleague Leon Lane who was active in the late 90s on TCC-L
                          > (teaching in community colleges listserver) which later became UCC-L
                          > (Uncensored Community College listserver) after someone at the hosting
                          > institution took umbrage at the criticism by instructors of the ways in
                          > general that CCs were going:
                          >
                          > Those who can, teach; Those who can't teach, shouldn't.
                          >
                          > Anj



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Deborah Shepherd
                          It gets confusing when we compare academic disciplines to training in the trades. Teaching may not always be teaching. As for non-academic experience in,
                          Message 12 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                          • 0 Attachment
                            It gets confusing when we compare academic disciplines to training in the
                            trades. Teaching may not always be "teaching." As for "non-academic"
                            experience in, say, something like anthropology, what is that? There's the
                            teaching of all current knowledge and thinking, and then there's the
                            creating of new knowledge. I thought earning a doctorate was in theory proof
                            of having experience in the "doing." In fact, having a master's degree was
                            supposed to be the same, to a degree (pun perhaps intended). Neither status
                            is achieved by taking a test. You supposedly plan, conduct, interpret, and
                            report on original research to pass to the next level. That's what I call
                            "doing."



                            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
                            Andrew Petto
                            Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 9:31 AM
                            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts





                            As Lloyd underscores, this "Explanation" is a *rationale* --- which we
                            all know is a justification for the way things are or the way we would
                            lie them to be.

                            Back in the day, the WI Tech System recognized the problem and required
                            that all its instructors complete a minimum 5-course training program on
                            how to teach (although most of the required courses were administrative,
                            there were a couple that really did address helping students to learn,
                            and some of the best information I had about teaching was in those).
                            These courses were minimal, but when you think about it, most academics
                            get even less than this.

                            The one thing I liked about the WTCS was that even academics had to show
                            non-academic experience in their fields (that is, more than just
                            teaching about it). But sometimes, it was a stretch, and it was just
                            another hoop to jump through. Never mind that I had a doctorate studying
                            comparative biology of primates with a post-doc at Harvard Medical
                            School; it was the 2 years that I served as an EMT and emergency room
                            technician before graduate school that met the requirement (some 20
                            years earlier). Go figure! How much could a field have changed in 20
                            years? Well, in the case of emergency medicine, a whole lot between 1977
                            and 1995. Certainly my academic work was more relevant for what I needed
                            to teach (general zoology) than my work as a serf in an ED back in the
                            70s. (Oops, that was back when ED meant "emergency department" and was
                            not an acronym for a condition requiring viagra).*

                            So, like most administrative requirements of this type, it fit the
                            rationale, but was a headache for both administrators and instructors.

                            Anj

                            *Fun fact: Viagra works by inhibiting the breakdown of cyclic GMP,
                            resulting in persistance of muscle action in the vasoconstrictors of the
                            corpora cavernosa and prevents or greatly slows the re-entry of blood
                            into the general circulation. In order for the optic nerve to receive
                            signals from the retina and create vision, light causes a chemical
                            change in the pigment compounds in the retina which CAUSES the breakdown
                            of cyclic GMP. So, no break-down of cGMP, no vision. And that is why
                            Viagra will make guys go blind (temporarily).

                            -----------------------------
                            Andrew J Petto, PhD
                            Senior Lecturer
                            Department of Biological Sciences
                            University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                            PO Box 413
                            Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                            CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                            Telephone: 414-229-6784
                            FAX: 414-229-3926
                            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                            *************
                            Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                            *************

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Deborah Shepherd
                            What happened to the Smithsonian Castle? Is it serious? Deb From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kaupp, Ann Sent:
                            Message 13 of 18 , Aug 24, 2011
                            • 0 Attachment
                              What happened to the Smithsonian Castle? Is it serious?



                              Deb



                              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kaupp, Ann
                              Sent: Wednesday, August 24, 2011 8:41 AM
                              To: 'SACC-L@yahoogroups.com'
                              Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Earthquake in DC






                              What an experience! I was talking to someone in western Maryland when the earthquake hit. The ole museum shook, my file cabinets knocked against each other and ceiling lights swayed. All the buildings evacuated. I soon got on the subway, which thankfully was running, and got a seat as I left before the big rush. The trains were going only 15 miles an hour. I took the route that travels above the river. The Smithsonian Castle and the support center in Maryland are closed until further notice. Ann


                              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                              Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 4:08 PM
                              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                              Subject: [SACC-L] Earthquake in DC



                              It was pretty strong here - the office shook for a good 20 seconds. It reminded me of Japan - except nobody knew what to do! We evacuated the building and then milled around outside trying to figure out what is going on for half an hour before campus police told us they were closing the school. Phones weren't working for a while. Traffic was horrible getting home. Metro is running at 15 miles/hr and they evacuated all the monuments, museums, the Pentagon, Capital, etc. downtown. Most things seem to be opening back up but everyone decided to go home at the same time so now there is gridlock. Something (a spire? is that what it is called?) fell off the National Cathedral and apparently a roof caved in at a Best Buy in DC but overall, very little damage - just a bunch of freaked out people!

                              We're at home now taking advantage of the afternoon off.

                              >________________________________
                              >From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com>>
                              >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                              >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 3:25 PM
                              >Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >I’ve been watching the earthquake news on TV. A 5.9 is bad enough. Hope the aftershocks are smaller. So far the most dramatic thing I’ve heard is that two VA nuclear power plants were shut down.
                              >
                              >From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
                              >Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:22 PM
                              >To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                              >Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                              >
                              >I was drafting something about this article but we just had an earthquake!!!!
                              >
                              >Nikki
                              >
                              >>________________________________
                              >>From: Deborah Shepherd <shephdj@... <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> <mailto:shephdj%40gmail.com> >
                              >>To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com> <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                              >>Sent: Tuesday, August 23, 2011 1:23 PM
                              >>Subject: [SACC-L] Growing Tide of Adjuncts
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>My former union sent this link out via Twitter:
                              >>
                              >>http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2011/08/21/20110821maricopa-college-s
                              >>ystem-adjunction.html
                              >>
                              >>Community college systems are now justifying the growing numbers of adjuncts
                              >>as somehow better for students than reliance on residential faculty. Since
                              >>when did part-time adjuncts become better "more experienced in the field"
                              >>teachers than the specialized professionals? The low pay ensures that
                              >>adjuncts are not likely to stick around because adjunct teaching on this
                              >>level is not a real job. Those who do stay look on their one or two courses
                              >>a year or a semester as a hobby or diversion from their other, paying job, I
                              >>suppose.
                              >>
                              >>I also like this amazing logic: "Maricopa is one of the largest
                              >>community-college districts in the country, but it must be nimble enough to
                              >>react quickly to economic trends, Harper-Marinick said. Maintaining a vast
                              >>pool of part-time faculty with short-term contracts allows that."
                              >>
                              >>Deborah
                              >>
                              >>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >>
                              >
                              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >
                              >

                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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