Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

RE: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments

Expand Messages
  • Gilliland, Mary
    Nikki: It sounds like you have lots of good ideas – it’s a matter of finding the right avenues at your college to make these things work. Simple things
    Message 1 of 13 , Apr 12, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Nikki: It sounds like you have lots of good ideas – it’s a matter of finding the right avenues at your college to make these things work. Simple things such as re-naming classes might be very helpful. Find out if the Curriculum process is really that difficult, or maybe even get on the curriculum council or committee. And you are absolutely right that most important in all this is transferability – if it doesn’t transfer mostly it won’t work.

      Good luck with the application!

      Mary Kay

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Nikki Ives
      Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 11:24 AM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments



      Hi All -

      Thanks so much for the feedback!

      Right now we offer:

      Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
      Introduction to Physical Anthropology
      Introduction to Archaeology
      Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
      Peoples and Cultures

      The only two that ever run are the intro to cultural/physical anthro courses. I
      think we need to rename the magic and witchcraft one. We have a high number of
      students here who refuse to read Harry Potter in the Children's Lit classes and
      I just get the feeling that anything with magic and witchcraft in the title is a
      major turn-off for many of our students here.

      I have proposed new courses with a lackluster response. One proposal was "Women
      in Japan" since I am the club advisor for the Anime Club and many of the
      students in this club have expressed an interest. I thought this could avoid
      the curriculum committee and fall into the "Peoples and Cultures" category and
      also be used in the Women's Studies program. That proposal did not go over
      well. Maybe it is just because I'm an adjunct, I'm not sure.

      Apparently it is perceived as being "a lot of work" to get a new course past the
      curriculum committee and I haven't found much support in that area. Of course,
      if I get this position, I will lobby for that again. As far as making the
      course "required" I'm not sure if that is an option any time soon. Again, I'll
      lobby for that with all of this advice in mind if I get this position.

      I like the idea of determining what it could fulfill at four-year colleges and
      see if the advisors can advise accordingly.

      Bob, you're right about the personal touch. During the peak registration time I
      go over to the registration area and talk to students and talk up my classes.
      It does seem to work so I'll keep doing that. Thanks again for all of your
      feedback - I really appreciate it!

      Nikki

      ________________________________
      From: Sydney Hart <shart9@...<mailto:shart9%40ccc.edu>>
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tue, April 12, 2011 1:04:52 PM
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments

      Hi, Nikki:

      It seems you have lots of great ideas! One other point to remember is that
      Anthropology fulfills a "Diversity" or "Multi-cultural" requirement for many
      4-year schools. I would take a quick look at local 4-years and then market
      Anthro as fulfilling their needs.

      Sydney

      Sydney Hart, Ph.D.
      Co-Chair, Social Sciences Department
      Assistant Professor, Sociology, Anthropology, and Global Studies
      Wilbur Wright College
      4300 North Narragansett Avenue
      Chicago, Illinois 60634
      >>> Nikki Ives <ikkinh@...<mailto:ikkinh%40yahoo.com>> 04/12/11 9:18 AM >>>
      Hi All -

      Sorry I couldn't make it to the SACC meeting. I hope you all had fun. I have a

      question for all of you and I apologize in advance that this is so long...

      The full-time anthropology person (and former SACC member) here at Prince
      George's Community College is about to retire after 40+ years of service.
      Unfortunately, anthropology here at the college is dying. It has been neglected

      over the past 5 or so years and enrollments have dropped so much that at this
      point, they are only offering a 1-year fixed-term position to replace the
      retiring anthropology person.

      I, of course, am going to throw caution to the wind and I have applied for the
      job fully realizing that if I get the position, I may be unemployed at the end
      of 2012. However, if I could figure out a way to start re-growing the program
      and increase enrollments, then, perhaps, there is a tiny sliver of hope that
      this could actually turn into a "real" job for me! Not to mention the fact that

      there will be an increase in students who are educated in the fascinating and
      relevant field of anthropology.

      So, my question to all of you is - how can I increase enrollments? Any ideas?
      Is it a matter of just getting the word out and advertising classes? Is it
      getting guest speakers? Keeping in mind I may not even get the job, here are
      the ideas that I've come up with (I figure this may also come up during the
      interview, if I even get an interview):

      1) Create a flier with information about how relevant anthropology is on one
      side and advertises the available classes on the other. Strategically place
      this flier around campus and near the advising offices during the peak
      registration period. (I actually already do this).

      2) Schmooze with the advisors and get them to direct students to anthropology
      classes. The problem with this is - anthropology is only an elective! Yes, a
      few years ago, someone neglected to remind the powers that be that anthropology
      is very relevant and it somehow got "dropped" from the "required" social science

      requirements for many majors here at the college. Have any of you ever done
      this? Do you think it matters that it is only an elective?

      3) Invite someone from the Association of Black Anthropologists to come speak at

      the school (since 70% of our students identify as Black, African or African
      American). My concern here is that nobody will show up to see the speaker - this

      happens a lot on our campus :-(

      4) Create an "Anthropology Resource Center". I like this idea - my problem is:
      where? There is literally NO SPACE on this campus. Seriously, they are
      converting the lunch room in our building to a classroom for next semester.
      They almost put the International Education Center in a janitor's closet! And,
      where would I get the money for the resources?? Any ideas about this? Maybe I
      could make a "traveling" resource center? Has anyone ever done this or heard of

      this?

      These are my ideas - do any of you have any ideas or input? I know you are all
      busy and I just wrote a novel here but, any advice will be much appreciated.
      Please help me save the dying anthropology department here at PGCC (or at least
      have something to say in the interview)!

      thanks,
      Nikki

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pam Ford
      Nikki, I suggest you contact Amanda Paskey at Cosumnes River College (California). She and her two colleagues have done some very innovative things for their
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 12, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Nikki,

        I suggest you contact Amanda Paskey at Cosumnes River College (California). She and her two colleagues have done some very innovative things for their department. One is that they have a Facebook page (they are very careful with it); they have "Lunch with an anthropologist" on a regular basis, and they have several other activities. They even have a logo which is a take off on the old "Charlie's Angels:" since there are three female anthros at Cosumnes River, they are the Anthro Angels. I know it sounds hokey, but the three of them have the ability to pull it off!

        I agree with Mary that you will want to get those courses incorporated into the degree/transfer requirements FIRST, but ideas like the ones above can help you instigate internal interest as well.

        Good luck!

        ~Pam Ford
        Mt. San Jacinto College
        San Jacinto, CA


        -----Original Message-----
        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Nikki Ives
        Sent: Tue 4/12/2011 7:18 AM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments

        Hi All -


        Sorry I couldn't make it to the SACC meeting. I hope you all had fun. I have a
        question for all of you and I apologize in advance that this is so long...

        The full-time anthropology person (and former SACC member) here at Prince
        George's Community College is about to retire after 40+ years of service.
        Unfortunately, anthropology here at the college is dying. It has been neglected
        over the past 5 or so years and enrollments have dropped so much that at this
        point, they are only offering a 1-year fixed-term position to replace the
        retiring anthropology person.


        I, of course, am going to throw caution to the wind and I have applied for the
        job fully realizing that if I get the position, I may be unemployed at the end
        of 2012. However, if I could figure out a way to start re-growing the program
        and increase enrollments, then, perhaps, there is a tiny sliver of hope that
        this could actually turn into a "real" job for me! Not to mention the fact that
        there will be an increase in students who are educated in the fascinating and
        relevant field of anthropology.

        So, my question to all of you is - how can I increase enrollments? Any ideas?
        Is it a matter of just getting the word out and advertising classes? Is it
        getting guest speakers? Keeping in mind I may not even get the job, here are
        the ideas that I've come up with (I figure this may also come up during the
        interview, if I even get an interview):


        1) Create a flier with information about how relevant anthropology is on one
        side and advertises the available classes on the other. Strategically place
        this flier around campus and near the advising offices during the peak
        registration period. (I actually already do this).

        2) Schmooze with the advisors and get them to direct students to anthropology
        classes. The problem with this is - anthropology is only an elective! Yes, a
        few years ago, someone neglected to remind the powers that be that anthropology
        is very relevant and it somehow got "dropped" from the "required" social science
        requirements for many majors here at the college. Have any of you ever done
        this? Do you think it matters that it is only an elective?


        3) Invite someone from the Association of Black Anthropologists to come speak at
        the school (since 70% of our students identify as Black, African or African
        American). My concern here is that nobody will show up to see the speaker - this
        happens a lot on our campus :-(

        4) Create an "Anthropology Resource Center". I like this idea - my problem is:
        where? There is literally NO SPACE on this campus. Seriously, they are
        converting the lunch room in our building to a classroom for next semester.
        They almost put the International Education Center in a janitor's closet! And,
        where would I get the money for the resources?? Any ideas about this? Maybe I
        could make a "traveling" resource center? Has anyone ever done this or heard of
        this?

        These are my ideas - do any of you have any ideas or input? I know you are all
        busy and I just wrote a novel here but, any advice will be much appreciated.
        Please help me save the dying anthropology department here at PGCC (or at least
        have something to say in the interview)!

        thanks,
        Nikki

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anthropmor
        My strongest recommendation is to try to get Anthropology listed as one of the options for the required social science - that would give you much more
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 12, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          My strongest recommendation is to try to get Anthropology listed as one
          of the options for the required social science - that would give you
          much more leverage. Most community colleges have a "curriculum"
          process, and you may be able to change the designation that way.


          especially for a nursing/ health sciences major.
          Good Luck - Mike Pavlik


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Gilliland, Mary <mkgilliland@...>
          To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tue, Apr 12, 2011 12:02 pm
          Subject: RE: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments




          Nikki:

          My strongest recommendation is to try to get Anthropology listed as one
          of the options for the required social science - that would give you
          much more leverage. Most community colleges have a "curriculum"
          process, and you may be able to change the designation that way.

          When I first came on board at Pima, Anthropology was not very strong.
          It had previously been on the list of one of a few social sciences for
          the College of Ed at the U of A, and had recently been taken off.

          I did a couple of things. First, there was a general requirement for
          students to take a class with a Non-Western Civilization orientation.
          Strangely Anthropology wasn't counted. I created a new class and called
          it "Exploring Non-Western Cultures" - bad title, but it worked like a
          charm. When we created the class, we included the additional curriculum
          paper work for having the course reviewed to satisfy this requirement,
          and we got it (probably just because of the title). It quickly became a
          popular course, and our enrollments went up.

          Following this model, there was a second special requirement for a
          class with Gender, Race and/or Ethnicity in the content. I created a
          new Gender and Culture class, did the extra curriculum paper work, and
          voila, we got a second class that fit a special requirement, and our
          enrollments continued to increase.

          Oddly, I got people into regular Intro to Cultural Anthro through the
          back door, as they enjoyed these courses and wanted more.

          We also have a strong Field Archaeology program, which requires our
          Intro courses, and so we funnel students who just want to go dig in the
          dirt into our classroom classes through this avenue.

          In the past 5 years, the Non-Western Civ and Gender/Race/Ethnicity
          requirements gave way to NEW requirements - students now, to finish a
          degree or a "transfer certificate" (which doesn't require as many
          classes as the full A.A. or A.S.) need one class each with content in
          "Global Awareness", Cultural Diversity" and "Intensive Writing" (the
          latter cannot be a regular writing class, but must be another class
          with strong writing components, and a page minimum is specified).

          I jumped on the band wagon and applied for these requirements for our
          classes. The old Exploring Non-Western Civ gets all three special
          requirements (the C, G and I) and is still one of the most popular
          classes district wide as a result! (Our system allows double dipping or
          even triple, with these special requirements). The Gender Class gets
          the C and G, and most of the rest of our classes get at least the G,
          usually a second one.

          We are on the list for social sciences that satisfy the social science
          requirements for most degrees and certificates, but it is the
          additional bonus of knocking out those special requirements that has
          students choosing anthropology.

          Of course we think we are the best department around, with great
          instructors ( :) ), and that once in our classes students will
          continue, and to some extent the latter seems to be true - we have lots
          of "repeat offenders" who show up.

          *** In brief, I would find out what the process is for being considered
          a required or recommended social science, and see if there are any
          other requirements you might be able to associate yourself with, and
          try to build from there. Students will go for maximum efficiency where
          possible.

          Mary Kay Gilliland
          Pima Community College
          Tucson, AZ

          From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
          Of Nikki Ives
          Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 7:18 AM
          To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments

          Hi All -

          Sorry I couldn't make it to the SACC meeting. I hope you all had fun. I
          have a
          question for all of you and I apologize in advance that this is so
          long...

          The full-time anthropology person (and former SACC member) here at
          Prince
          George's Community College is about to retire after 40+ years of
          service.
          Unfortunately, anthropology here at the college is dying. It has been
          neglected
          over the past 5 or so years and enrollments have dropped so much that
          at this
          point, they are only offering a 1-year fixed-term position to replace
          the
          retiring anthropology person.

          I, of course, am going to throw caution to the wind and I have applied
          for the
          job fully realizing that if I get the position, I may be unemployed at
          the end
          of 2012. However, if I could figure out a way to start re-growing the
          program
          and increase enrollments, then, perhaps, there is a tiny sliver of hope
          that
          this could actually turn into a "real" job for me! Not to mention the
          fact that
          there will be an increase in students who are educated in the
          fascinating and
          relevant field of anthropology.

          So, my question to all of you is - how can I increase enrollments? Any
          ideas?
          Is it a matter of just getting the word out and advertising classes? Is
          it
          getting guest speakers? Keeping in mind I may not even get the job,
          here are
          the ideas that I've come up with (I figure this may also come up during
          the
          interview, if I even get an interview):

          1) Create a flier with information about how relevant anthropology is
          on one
          side and advertises the available classes on the other. Strategically
          place
          this flier around campus and near the advising offices during the peak
          registration period. (I actually already do this).

          2) Schmooze with the advisors and get them to direct students to
          anthropology
          classes. The problem with this is - anthropology is only an elective!
          Yes, a
          few years ago, someone neglected to remind the powers that be that
          anthropology
          is very relevant and it somehow got "dropped" from the "required"
          social science
          requirements for many majors here at the college. Have any of you ever
          done
          this? Do you think it matters that it is only an elective?

          3) Invite someone from the Association of Black Anthropologists to come
          speak at
          the school (since 70% of our students identify as Black, African or
          African
          American). My concern here is that nobody will show up to see the
          speaker - this
          happens a lot on our campus :-(

          4) Create an "Anthropology Resource Center". I like this idea - my
          problem is:
          where? There is literally NO SPACE on this campus. Seriously, they are
          converting the lunch room in our building to a classroom for next
          semester.
          They almost put the International Education Center in a janitor's
          closet! And,
          where would I get the money for the resources?? Any ideas about this?
          Maybe I
          could make a "traveling" resource center? Has anyone ever done this or
          heard of
          this?

          These are my ideas - do any of you have any ideas or input? I know you
          are all
          busy and I just wrote a novel here but, any advice will be much
          appreciated.
          Please help me save the dying anthropology department here at PGCC (or
          at least
          have something to say in the interview)!

          thanks,
          Nikki

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Mark Lewine
          Nikki: I am looking for a copy of the plan that I did when I started building an anthro program at a similar community college with a similar demographic.
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 12, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            Nikki: I am looking for a copy of the plan that I did when I started building an anthro program at a similar community college with a similar demographic. Until then, let me add a few items from memory, as we built our program with many of the same problems over a relatively few years from one intro cultural section to a three field program, with
            1.. It is important to build with a dean partner and an approved plan. Build toward a dept. with separate budget and a Program Coordinator position formed with your Dean. Offer a written 3-5 Year Plan for growth and development of anthro in a local-global context. (local club, local digs, local presentations in ethnic neighborhood centers, to counseling dept., to linked occupational programs: nursing, law enforcement, hospitality management, Honor's Program.) Deans like this kind of linkage and you can include faculty partners in the linked areas...I did Food and Culture projects added to my 1010 class linked to Hospitality Management, health/medical care projects with my nursing students...was going to try a pre-Forensics section of Intro to Biological Anth and Intro to Archeology linked to local forensics programs .
            2.. If you do archaeology, try linking the course to a campus field site for historical arch. and get a grant to do so. External local/state/national grants bring with them admin support and in-kind contribution...I got a lab in our campus from this effort. You can start this field effort with a high school(s) linked with credit in escrow program. Archaeology only fills with such student populations...look for a high school history or soc. studies partner to do that.
            3.. 3 cultural sections: Intro to Cultural, Peoples and Cultures, and Urban Cultures...we had a Magic W, and Rel., but it died without linking to the Religion/Philosophy Dept...and I had to take out the Magic label as it was attacked by the heavy-handed Christian evangelicals in our counseling dept. and among the faculty. The Peoples and Cultures course is a comparative ethnology course that I wrote and was first done as a videocourse produced at our college, then reworked into a web class that runs 4-6 sections as a 200-level class that satisfies a local non-Western diversity requirement for our linked 4 year university.
            4.. Growth began with utilizing the new delivery systems as they came up: telecourses, webcourses, cable courses. For 1010 the first growth happened with use of Faces of Culture telecourse and use of the video series for our traditional classes...then we constructed our own cable and video classes with a county-wide draw for students....then we got into web classes and built quickly with those.
            5.. we also marketed classes online to high schools for credit in escrow, to other off-site students like military personnel and students wanting to take anthro at our college rather than local 4 year colleges.
            6.. we built anth 1010 from one to 7-10 sections per term using the student peer interactions with an active Anthro Student Club with myself as advisor, and connected funtionally to the International Student Club for social events and for projects. growth continued strongly due to our web delivery system...we can run almost as many as we want to handle with this Blackboard option with seminars on campus offered..
            7..
            8.. Intro to Physical, web-based, two sections...being renamed soon as Intro to Human Origins though I asked for Intro to Biological Anthro. Wanted to link this class with pre-Forensics program and add Intro to Archaeology. (methods are very close) need lab unless it becomes a webclass, then need lab simulation.
            9.. Intro to Archaeology, Archaeological Field Methods with lab component. This Field Methods course is geared toward student interns in our lab and with our CCR program.
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Nikki Ives
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2011 2:23 PM
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments



            Hi All -

            Thanks so much for the feedback!

            Right now we offer:

            Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
            Introduction to Physical Anthropology
            Introduction to Archaeology
            Magic, Witchcraft and Religion
            Peoples and Cultures

            The only two that ever run are the intro to cultural/physical anthro courses. I
            think we need to rename the magic and witchcraft one. We have a high number of
            students here who refuse to read Harry Potter in the Children's Lit classes and
            I just get the feeling that anything with magic and witchcraft in the title is a
            major turn-off for many of our students here.

            I have proposed new courses with a lackluster response. One proposal was "Women
            in Japan" since I am the club advisor for the Anime Club and many of the
            students in this club have expressed an interest. I thought this could avoid
            the curriculum committee and fall into the "Peoples and Cultures" category and
            also be used in the Women's Studies program. That proposal did not go over
            well. Maybe it is just because I'm an adjunct, I'm not sure.

            Apparently it is perceived as being "a lot of work" to get a new course past the
            curriculum committee and I haven't found much support in that area. Of course,
            if I get this position, I will lobby for that again. As far as making the
            course "required" I'm not sure if that is an option any time soon. Again, I'll
            lobby for that with all of this advice in mind if I get this position.

            I like the idea of determining what it could fulfill at four-year colleges and
            see if the advisors can advise accordingly.

            Bob, you're right about the personal touch. During the peak registration time I
            go over to the registration area and talk to students and talk up my classes.
            It does seem to work so I'll keep doing that. Thanks again for all of your
            feedback - I really appreciate it!

            Nikki

            ________________________________
            From: Sydney Hart <shart9@...>
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Tue, April 12, 2011 1:04:52 PM
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] How to increase enrollments

            Hi, Nikki:

            It seems you have lots of great ideas! One other point to remember is that
            Anthropology fulfills a "Diversity" or "Multi-cultural" requirement for many
            4-year schools. I would take a quick look at local 4-years and then market
            Anthro as fulfilling their needs.

            Sydney

            Sydney Hart, Ph.D.
            Co-Chair, Social Sciences Department
            Assistant Professor, Sociology, Anthropology, and Global Studies
            Wilbur Wright College
            4300 North Narragansett Avenue
            Chicago, Illinois 60634
            >>> Nikki Ives <ikkinh@...> 04/12/11 9:18 AM >>>
            Hi All -

            Sorry I couldn't make it to the SACC meeting. I hope you all had fun. I have a

            question for all of you and I apologize in advance that this is so long...

            The full-time anthropology person (and former SACC member) here at Prince
            George's Community College is about to retire after 40+ years of service.
            Unfortunately, anthropology here at the college is dying. It has been neglected

            over the past 5 or so years and enrollments have dropped so much that at this
            point, they are only offering a 1-year fixed-term position to replace the
            retiring anthropology person.

            I, of course, am going to throw caution to the wind and I have applied for the
            job fully realizing that if I get the position, I may be unemployed at the end
            of 2012. However, if I could figure out a way to start re-growing the program
            and increase enrollments, then, perhaps, there is a tiny sliver of hope that
            this could actually turn into a "real" job for me! Not to mention the fact that

            there will be an increase in students who are educated in the fascinating and
            relevant field of anthropology.

            So, my question to all of you is - how can I increase enrollments? Any ideas?
            Is it a matter of just getting the word out and advertising classes? Is it
            getting guest speakers? Keeping in mind I may not even get the job, here are
            the ideas that I've come up with (I figure this may also come up during the
            interview, if I even get an interview):

            1) Create a flier with information about how relevant anthropology is on one
            side and advertises the available classes on the other. Strategically place
            this flier around campus and near the advising offices during the peak
            registration period. (I actually already do this).

            2) Schmooze with the advisors and get them to direct students to anthropology
            classes. The problem with this is - anthropology is only an elective! Yes, a
            few years ago, someone neglected to remind the powers that be that anthropology
            is very relevant and it somehow got "dropped" from the "required" social science

            requirements for many majors here at the college. Have any of you ever done
            this? Do you think it matters that it is only an elective?

            3) Invite someone from the Association of Black Anthropologists to come speak at

            the school (since 70% of our students identify as Black, African or African
            American). My concern here is that nobody will show up to see the speaker - this

            happens a lot on our campus :-(

            4) Create an "Anthropology Resource Center". I like this idea - my problem is:
            where? There is literally NO SPACE on this campus. Seriously, they are
            converting the lunch room in our building to a classroom for next semester.
            They almost put the International Education Center in a janitor's closet! And,
            where would I get the money for the resources?? Any ideas about this? Maybe I
            could make a "traveling" resource center? Has anyone ever done this or heard of

            this?

            These are my ideas - do any of you have any ideas or input? I know you are all
            busy and I just wrote a novel here but, any advice will be much appreciated.
            Please help me save the dying anthropology department here at PGCC (or at least
            have something to say in the interview)!

            thanks,
            Nikki

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.