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Re: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar

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  • Andrew J Petto
    Well, sure. I would rather never have to do this. I would also like never to have to discipline my grandchildren, but it comes with the territory. Nothing
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 17, 2010
      Well, sure. I would rather never have to do this. I would also like never to have to discipline my grandchildren, but it comes with the territory. Nothing seems to me to devalue what we do faster than having students cheat their way through our courses. And in my case, 70% of these guys are aspiring medical professionals!

      Anj

      ------------
      Andrew J Petto, PhD
      Senior Lecturer
      Department of Biological Sciences
      University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
      PO Box 413
      Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
      CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
      Telephone: 414-229-6784
      FAX: 414-229-3926
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

      *************
      Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
      *************

      "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

      -- Pat Conroy
      The Prince of Tides

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: "Anthropmor" <anthropmor@...>
      Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 12:29:44 PM
      Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar






      I find chasing down plagiarists to be terribly time-consuming and a definite distraction from my focus on teaching content to the interested students. I'm sure others feel that way, too. It seems to me more efficient if campuses could develop centralized offices and specialists to deal with these safeguards and investigations. Instead of me checking IDs and signatures, a campus representative would do it, perhaps not even during class time. Instead of me verifying whether a paper was plagiarized, I could send all suspect papers or even a random sample to the office for verification. Maybe all tests should be given in test centers.

      I would rather the students saw me as their teacher, not as the classroom security guard.

      Just some thoughts.

      Deborah

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of Andrew Petto
      Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 7:04 AM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Cc: Anthropmor
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar

      There is an interesting anthropological phenomenon here: At the same
      time as our culture has increased its insistence on certification and
      credentials, we have devalued them immensely by accepting that acquiring
      them by any means is a standard practice. If anyone can get a degree,
      diploma, or certificate simply by buying the work (or the document),
      what are those things worth?

      We have moved from valuing merit and achievement to the expectation that
      a person's suitability and worth come entirely from within and not from
      having earned acceptance through demonstrated ability. The con artist
      always wins in this scenario.

      And so we get world-wide financial crises and empty suits in government.

      Anj (who now has to go and chase down 18 plagiarists in his class).

      On 17-Nov-10 06:46, Anthropmor wrote:
      >
      >
      > apologies for cross posting, but here is the link to the article about
      > on line cheating Mike Pavlik
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Jacob I Lee < jacoblee@... <mailto:jacoblee%40CSUFRESNO.EDU>
      > <mailto:jacoblee%40CSUFRESNO.EDU>>
      > To: ANTHRO-L < ANTHRO-L@... <mailto:ANTHRO-L%40LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU>
      > <mailto:ANTHRO-L%40LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU>>
      > Sent: Tue, Nov 16, 2010 1:44 pm
      > Subject: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar
      >
      > http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/
      > The Shadow Scholar: The man who writes your students' papers tells his
      > story
      >
      > (one reason online exams are a bad idea).
      >
      > Jacob
      >
      > Subscription options and archives available:
      > http://listserv.buffalo.edu/archives/anthro-l.html
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >

      --

      -----------------------------
      Andrew J Petto, PhD
      Senior Lecturer
      Department of Biological Sciences
      University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
      PO Box 413
      Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
      CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
      Telephone: 414-229-6784
      FAX: 414-229-3926
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

      *************
      Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
      https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
      *************

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Anthropmor
      I had said, that in igh school, (amazingly) no one had ever told them about the nature and purposes f a liberal arts education, and often no one had discussed
      Message 2 of 7 , Nov 17, 2010
        I had said, that in
        igh school, (amazingly) no one had ever told them about the nature and purposes
        f a liberal arts education, and often no one had discussed WHY cheating or
        lagiarism were wrong.


        honestly, this should be surprising but isn't. These are values to only a portion of our society.
        Mike Pavlik





        -----Original Message-----
        From: Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...>
        To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wed, Nov 17, 2010 2:20 pm
        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar


        Deborah, I agree with you that chasing down plagiarists is time-consuming and
        ot worth a teacher's time, and that none of us really signed on to be security
        uards. However, I think it's unlikely that colleges would hire special
        on-teaching staff to do these tasks. Since teachers seem to be the only ones
        ho talk or write about cheating, it will most likely fall on our shoulders to
        o something about it.
        Whatever the veracity of the Shadow Scholar's report, I doubt very much that
        ome of his student customers were not caught. I never chased down plagiarists.
        f I suspected that a paper was plagiarized, I called the student into my office
        nd discussed it with him or her: describe to me how you went about writing
        his, tell me about your sources, what do you mean by (quote from the paper),
        nd any other questions that would require the student to demonstrate to me that
        /he knew what it was about. In almost every case, the student would at some
        oint break down and admit to plagiarism.
        But let me tell you why. Early in my teaching career, I composed a short essay
        xplaining what plagiarism and cheating were and why they were wrong. I included
        t in all my syllabi from then on (I put this on the listserv some time ago when
        e last discussed this topic). In the first class meeting of each semester, when
        explained and answered questions on the syllabus, I elaborated on this essay
        nd led a discussion on cheating.

        riefly, I told students that one of my most important responsibilities to the
        tate of Iowa was to evaluate and verify their learning in accordance with the
        tated course objectives, and to assign a grade that accurately and truthfully
        epresented that learning. I told them that plagiarism and other forms of
        heating were frauds committed against this system and against the spirit and
        ntent of a liberal arts education (a description of which also appeared in the
        yllabus), and that when they succeeded in cheating, they made me an unwitting
        ccomplice in their fraud. I concluded by expressing hope that none of them
        ould do this, and I explained in a matter-of-fact tone the consequences of
        heating�a zero for the exam or paper, flunking the course, having a "document"
        laced in their [actually non-existent] file, etc.
        As Phil stated earlier in the discussion, much of this was theater. However, it
        onveyed to students that I cared about this matter, and it wasn't hard to
        onvince them about this because I really did care. Sometimes after class, one
        r several students would tell me that they appreciated what I had said, that in
        igh school, (amazingly) no one had ever told them about the nature and purposes
        f a liberal arts education, and often no one had discussed WHY cheating or
        lagiarism were wrong.
        I'm sure that I didn't deter them all from cheating. In fact, wooed by my own
        hetoric, one semester I made a practice of leaving the room during exams in a
        mall Intermediate Spanish class�the "cream of the crop" and some of my favorite
        tudents, of course I "trusted" them, right? When I returned one time, I
        iscovered four of them openly cheating. I was heart-broken, yet flunked them
        or the course. One came and pleaded for another chance�bright kid, had a
        cholarship, etc. I did not grant it. Nonetheless, he re-took the course the
        ollowing semester and earned an honest "A."
        I think the point is that students (neophytes at learning), like children
        neophytes at life), need to know where the boundaries are. Teachers are the
        nly ones who can show them the boundaries and not appear as security guards.
        Well, that's my story and I'm stickin' to it! :)
        Lloyd

        On Nov 17, 2010, at 12:29 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:
        > I find chasing down plagiarists to be terribly time-consuming and a definite
        istraction from my focus on teaching content to the interested students. I'm
        ure others feel that way, too. It seems to me more efficient if campuses could
        evelop centralized offices and specialists to deal with these safeguards and
        nvestigations. Instead of me checking IDs and signatures, a campus
        epresentative would do it, perhaps not even during class time. Instead of me
        erifying whether a paper was plagiarized, I could send all suspect papers or
        ven a random sample to the office for verification. Maybe all tests should be
        iven in test centers.

        I would rather the students saw me as their teacher, not as the classroom
        ecurity guard.

        Just some thoughts.

        Deborah

        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        ndrew Petto
        Sent: Wednesday, November 17, 2010 7:04 AM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Cc: Anthropmor
        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar

        There is an interesting anthropological phenomenon here: At the same
        time as our culture has increased its insistence on certification and
        credentials, we have devalued them immensely by accepting that acquiring
        them by any means is a standard practice. If anyone can get a degree,
        diploma, or certificate simply by buying the work (or the document),
        what are those things worth?

        We have moved from valuing merit and achievement to the expectation that
        a person's suitability and worth come entirely from within and not from
        having earned acceptance through demonstrated ability. The con artist
        always wins in this scenario.

        And so we get world-wide financial crises and empty suits in government.

        Anj (who now has to go and chase down 18 plagiarists in his class).

        On 17-Nov-10 06:46, Anthropmor wrote:
        >
        >
        > apologies for cross posting, but here is the link to the article about
        > on line cheating Mike Pavlik
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Jacob I Lee <jacoblee@...<mailto:jacoblee%40CSUFRESNO.EDU>
        > <mailto:jacoblee%40CSUFRESNO.EDU>>
        > To: ANTHRO-L <ANTHRO-L@...<mailto:ANTHRO-L%40LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU>
        > <mailto:ANTHRO-L%40LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU>>
        > Sent: Tue, Nov 16, 2010 1:44 pm
        > Subject: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar
        >
        > http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/
        > The Shadow Scholar: The man who writes your students' papers tells his
        > story
        >
        > (one reason online exams are a bad idea).
        >
        > Jacob
        >
        > Subscription options and archives available:
        > http://listserv.buffalo.edu/archives/anthro-l.html
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        --

        -----------------------------
        Andrew J Petto, PhD
        Senior Lecturer
        Department of Biological Sciences
        University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
        PO Box 413
        Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
        CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
        Telephone: 414-229-6784
        FAX: 414-229-3926
        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

        *************
        Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
        https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
        *************

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        ------------------------------------
        Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo! Groups
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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Anthropmor
        this is not new, of course, - it clearly goes along with coercive measures. Divine right of kings, most class based crap goes along with that. Mike Pavlik,
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 20, 2010
          this is not new, of course, - it clearly goes along with coercive measures. Divine right of kings, most "class" based crap goes along with that.
          Mike Pavlik, already tired of Prince Harrys wedding


          We have moved from valuing merit and achievement to the expectation that
          a person's suitability and worth come entirely from within and not from
          having earned acceptance through demonstrated ability. The con artist
          always wins in this scenario






          -----Original Message-----
          From: Andrew Petto <ajpetto@...>
          To: SACC-L <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Cc: Anthropmor <anthropmor@...>
          Sent: Wed, Nov 17, 2010 7:03 am
          Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Fwd: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar




          There is an interesting anthropological phenomenon here: At the same
          time as our culture has increased its insistence on certification and
          credentials, we have devalued them immensely by accepting that acquiring
          them by any means is a standard practice. If anyone can get a degree,
          diploma, or certificate simply by buying the work (or the document),
          what are those things worth?

          We have moved from valuing merit and achievement to the expectation that
          a person's suitability and worth come entirely from within and not from
          having earned acceptance through demonstrated ability. The con artist
          always wins in this scenario.

          And so we get world-wide financial crises and empty suits in government.

          Anj (who now has to go and chase down 18 plagiarists in his class).

          On 17-Nov-10 06:46, Anthropmor wrote:
          >
          >
          > apologies for cross posting, but here is the link to the article about
          > on line cheating Mike Pavlik
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Jacob I Lee <jacoblee@...
          > <mailto:jacoblee%40CSUFRESNO.EDU>>;
          > To: ANTHRO-L <ANTHRO-L@...
          > <mailto:ANTHRO-L%40LISTSERV.BUFFALO.EDU>>;
          > Sent: Tue, Nov 16, 2010 1:44 pm
          > Subject: [ANTHRO-L] The Shadow Scholar
          >
          > http://chronicle.com/article/The-Shadow-Scholar/125329/
          > The Shadow Scholar: The man who writes your students' papers tells his
          > story
          >
          > (one reason online exams are a bad idea).
          >
          > Jacob
          >
          > Subscription options and archives available:
          > http://listserv.buffalo.edu/archives/anthro-l.html
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >

          --

          -----------------------------
          Andrew J Petto, PhD
          Senior Lecturer
          Department of Biological Sciences
          University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
          PO Box 413
          Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
          CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
          Telephone: 414-229-6784
          FAX: 414-229-3926
          https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

          *************
          Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
          https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
          *************

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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