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Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't comprehend....

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  • George Thomas
    Here we go again! (George Thomas)   New York Times, August 1, 2010 Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age By Trip Gabriel At Rhode Island College,
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 2, 2010
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      Here we go again!
      (George Thomas)
       
      New York Times, August 1, 2010

      Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
      By Trip Gabriel
      At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include author information.

      At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student’s copying was the purple shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive — he just wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
      And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries — unsigned and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
      Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty much left it at that.
      But these cases — typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the plagiarism — suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words they did not write is a serious misdeed.
      It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study plagiarism.
      Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students — who came of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking — understand the concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
      “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information is just out there for anyone to take.”
      Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to understand why it is so widespread.
      In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about 40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in written assignments.
      Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
      Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
      “This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual property don’t have the same gravity,” said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is older than most undergraduates. “When you’re sitting at your computer, it’s the same machine you’ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.”
      Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences between researching in the stacks and online. “Because you’re not walking into a library, you’re not physically holding the article, which takes you closer to ‘this doesn’t belong to me,’ ” she said. Online, “everything can belong to you really easily.”
      A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view authorship and the written word, or “texts” in Ms. Blum’s academic language.
      She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates. “Today’s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts and the people who create them and who quote them,” she wrote last year in the book “My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,” published by Cornell University Press.
      Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today — TV shows that constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier songs.
      In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual. It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
      “Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it may be waning,” Ms. Blum said.
      She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique and authentic identity — as their 1960s counterparts were — than in trying on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
      “If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique, then it’s O.K. if you say other people’s words, it’s O.K. if you say things you don’t believe, it’s O.K. if you write papers you couldn’t care less about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and getting a grade,” Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. “And it’s O.K. if you put words out there without getting any credit.”
      The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include passages lifted from others.
      Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, “There’s no such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.” A few critics rose to her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did not win).
      That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards “does not foster creativity, it fosters laziness.”
      “You’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and matching,” said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in her student newspaper headlined “Generation Plagiarism.”
      “It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative people — authors and artists and scholars — who are doing original work,” Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. “It’s kind of an insult that that ideal is gone, and now we’re left only to make collages of the work of previous generations.”
      In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of informal editor of other students’ papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
      The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
      “If you’re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your own original argument in middle and high school, you’re not going to be tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won’t do so unknowingly,” she said.
      At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
      Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied — knowing it was wrong — who were “unwilling to engage the writing process.”
      “Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,” he said.
      And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation’s evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr. Dudley’s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it would not happen again.






      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kent Morris
      Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past, and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 3, 2010
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        Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
        and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
        regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...>
        To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
        Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
        comprehend....


        Here we go again!
        (George Thomas)

        New York Times, August 1, 2010

        Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
        By Trip Gabriel
        At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s
        frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he
        needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
        author information.

        At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student’s copying was the purple
        shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
        writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive — he just
        wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
        And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
        Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries —
        unsigned and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they
        counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
        Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
        credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
        much left it at that.
        But these cases — typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
        responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
        plagiarism — suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
        they did not write is a serious misdeed.
        It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
        intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
        unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
        plagiarism.
        Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
        the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students — who came
        of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking — understand the
        concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
        “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information
        that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to
        have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
        Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information
        is just out there for anyone to take.”
        Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are
        champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to
        understand why it is so widespread.
        In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
        for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
        40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
        written assignments.
        Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
        constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in
        recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
        Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
        of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
        “This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
        property don’t have the same gravity,” said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
        older than most undergraduates. “When you’re sitting at your computer, it’s
        the same machine you’ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
        machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.”
        Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
        between researching in the stacks and online. “Because you’re not walking
        into a library, you’re not physically holding the article, which takes you
        closer to ‘this doesn’t belong to me,’ ” she said. Online, “everything can
        belong to you really easily.”
        A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
        high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
        authorship and the written word, or “texts” in Ms. Blum’s academic language.
        She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
        “Today’s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
        and the people who create them and who quote them,” she wrote last year in
        the book “My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,” published by Cornell
        University Press.
        Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
        pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today — TV shows that
        constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
        songs.
        In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
        creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
        It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
        secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
        “Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
        may be waning,” Ms. Blum said.
        She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
        and authentic identity — as their 1960s counterparts were — than in trying
        on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
        “If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
        then it’s O.K. if you say other people’s words, it’s O.K. if you say things
        you don’t believe, it’s O.K. if you write papers you couldn’t care less
        about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
        getting a grade,” Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. “And it’s O.K.
        if you put words out there without getting any credit.”
        The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
        from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
        brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
        whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
        passages lifted from others.
        Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, “There’s no
        such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.” A few critics rose to
        her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
        not win).
        That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
        University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards “does not foster
        creativity, it fosters laziness.”
        “You’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and
        matching,” said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
        her student newspaper headlined “Generation Plagiarism.”
        “It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
        people — authors and artists and scholars — who are doing original work,”
        Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. “It’s kind of an insult that that ideal
        is gone, and now we’re left only to make collages of the work of previous
        generations.”
        In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
        informal editor of other students’ papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
        has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
        The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
        unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
        “If you’re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
        own original argument in middle and high school, you’re not going to be
        tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won’t do so
        unknowingly,” she said.
        At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
        to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
        ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
        Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
        campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied — knowing it was
        wrong — who were “unwilling to engage the writing process.”
        “Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,” he said.
        And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation’s
        evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
        Dudley’s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
        one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
        would not happen again.






        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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      • George Thomas
        Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For what it s worth, here s my take. The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 4, 2010
        • 0 Attachment
          Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For what it's worth, here's my take.
          The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching, but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this fits in conjunction with the first amendment.  So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
          I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the I-Phone.  Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
          Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability somehow. 
          I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on this.
          ~ ~ ~
          Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final exam of an ex-student.  It was obvious, as one final after another had precisely the same wording on the short answer portion.  The attitude seems to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points).  Not quite the same thing as plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
          G
           
             Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@... kenthm52
              Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

          Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
          and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
          regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...>
          To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
          Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
          comprehend....


          Here we go again!
          (George Thomas)

          New York Times, August 1, 2010

          Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
          By Trip Gabriel
          At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s
          frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he
          needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
          author information.

          At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student’s copying was the purple
          shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
          writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive — he just
          wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
          And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
          Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries —
          unsigned and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they
          counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
          Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
          credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
          much left it at that.
          But these cases — typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
          responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
          plagiarism — suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
          they did not write is a serious misdeed.
          It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
          intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
          unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
          plagiarism.
          Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
          the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students — who came
          of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking — understand the
          concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
          “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information
          that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to
          have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
          Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information
          is just out there for anyone to take.”
          Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are
          champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to
          understand why it is so widespread.
          In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
          for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
          40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
          written assignments.
          Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
          constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in
          recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
          Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
          of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
          “This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
          property don’t have the same gravity,” said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
          older than most undergraduates. “When you’re sitting at your computer, it’s
          the same machine you’ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
          machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.”
          Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
          between researching in the stacks and online. “Because you’re not walking
          into a library, you’re not physically holding the article, which takes you
          closer to ‘this doesn’t belong to me,’ ” she said. Online, “everything can
          belong to you really easily.”
          A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
          high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
          authorship and the written word, or “texts” in Ms. Blum’s academic language.
          She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
          “Today’s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
          and the people who create them and who quote them,” she wrote last year in
          the book “My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,” published by Cornell
          University Press.
          Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
          pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today — TV shows that
          constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
          songs.
          In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
          creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
          It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
          secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
          “Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
          may be waning,” Ms. Blum said.
          She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
          and authentic identity — as their 1960s counterparts were — than in trying
          on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
          “If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
          then it’s O.K. if you say other people’s words, it’s O.K. if you say things
          you don’t believe, it’s O.K. if you write papers you couldn’t care less
          about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
          getting a grade,” Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. “And it’s O.K.
          if you put words out there without getting any credit.”
          The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
          from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
          brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
          whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
          passages lifted from others.
          Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, “There’s no
          such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.” A few critics rose to
          her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
          not win).
          That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
          University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards “does not foster
          creativity, it fosters laziness.”
          “You’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and
          matching,” said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
          her student newspaper headlined “Generation Plagiarism.”
          “It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
          people — authors and artists and scholars — who are doing original work,”
          Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. “It’s kind of an insult that that ideal
          is gone, and now we’re left only to make collages of the work of previous
          generations.”
          In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
          informal editor of other students’ papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
          has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
          The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
          unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
          “If you’re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
          own original argument in middle and high school, you’re not going to be
          tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won’t do so
          unknowingly,” she said.
          At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
          to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
          ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
          Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
          campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied — knowing it was
          wrong — who were “unwilling to engage the writing process.”
          “Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,” he said.
          And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation’s
          evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
          Dudley’s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
          one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
          would not happen again.







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kent Morris
          George-- I ve also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of student body files ... This past summer school session, I had five or six
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 5, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            George--

            I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
            "student body files"...

            This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of 35)
            submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any citations...I
            usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right way
            instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance, three
            of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
            submitted...

            Thank you for all your thoughts...

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...>
            To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:52 AM
            Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
            comprehend....


            Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For
            what it's worth, here's my take.
            The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching,
            but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual
            property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this
            fits in conjunction with the first amendment. So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
            I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related
            to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the
            article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a
            back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the
            I-Phone. Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
            Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording
            in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability
            somehow.
            I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on
            this.
            ~ ~ ~
            Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet
            (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final
            exam of an ex-student. It was obvious, as one final after another had
            precisely the same wording on the short answer portion. The attitude seems
            to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points). Not quite the same thing as
            plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
            G

            Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@... kenthm52
            Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

            Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
            and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
            regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...>
            To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
            Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
            comprehend....


            Here we go again!
            (George Thomas)

            New York Times, August 1, 2010

            Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
            By Trip Gabriel
            At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site’s
            frequently asked questions page about homelessness — and did not think he
            needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
            author information.

            At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student’s copying was the purple
            shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
            writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive — he just
            wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
            And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
            Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries —
            unsigned and collectively written — did not need to be credited since they
            counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
            Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
            credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
            much left it at that.
            But these cases — typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
            responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
            plagiarism — suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
            they did not write is a serious misdeed.
            It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
            intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
            unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
            plagiarism.
            Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
            the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students — who came
            of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking — understand the
            concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
            “Now we have a whole generation of students who’ve grown up with information
            that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn’t seem to
            have an author,” said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
            Integrity at Clemson University. “It’s possible to believe this information
            is just out there for anyone to take.”
            Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it — many are
            champions of academic honesty on their campuses — but rather try to
            understand why it is so widespread.
            In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
            for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
            40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
            written assignments.
            Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
            constitutes “serious cheating” is declining — to 29 percent on average in
            recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
            Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
            of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
            “This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
            property don’t have the same gravity,” said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
            older than most undergraduates. “When you’re sitting at your computer, it’s
            the same machine you’ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
            machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.”
            Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
            between researching in the stacks and online. “Because you’re not walking
            into a library, you’re not physically holding the article, which takes you
            closer to ‘this doesn’t belong to me,’ ” she said. Online, “everything can
            belong to you really easily.”
            A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
            high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
            authorship and the written word, or “texts” in Ms. Blum’s academic language.
            She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
            “Today’s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
            and the people who create them and who quote them,” she wrote last year in
            the book “My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,” published by Cornell
            University Press.
            Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
            pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today — TV shows that
            constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
            songs.
            In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
            creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
            It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
            secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
            “Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
            may be waning,” Ms. Blum said.
            She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
            and authentic identity — as their 1960s counterparts were — than in trying
            on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
            “If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
            then it’s O.K. if you say other people’s words, it’s O.K. if you say things
            you don’t believe, it’s O.K. if you write papers you couldn’t care less
            about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
            getting a grade,” Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. “And it’s O.K.
            if you put words out there without getting any credit.”
            The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
            from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
            brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
            whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
            passages lifted from others.
            Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, “There’s no
            such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.” A few critics rose to
            her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
            not win).
            That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
            University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards “does not foster
            creativity, it fosters laziness.”
            “You’re not coming up with new ideas if you’re grabbing and mixing and
            matching,” said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
            her student newspaper headlined “Generation Plagiarism.”
            “It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
            people — authors and artists and scholars — who are doing original work,”
            Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. “It’s kind of an insult that that ideal
            is gone, and now we’re left only to make collages of the work of previous
            generations.”
            In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
            informal editor of other students’ papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
            has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
            The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
            unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
            “If you’re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
            own original argument in middle and high school, you’re not going to be
            tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won’t do so
            unknowingly,” she said.
            At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
            to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
            ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
            Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
            campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied — knowing it was
            wrong — who were “unwilling to engage the writing process.”
            “Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,” he said.
            And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation’s
            evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
            Dudley’s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
            one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
            would not happen again.







            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            ------------------------------------

            Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
            Groups Links




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          • Deborah Shepherd
            I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do change up my essay questions on tests every year. I think part of the problem is that K-12
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 5, 2010
            • 0 Attachment
              I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do change up my essay questions on tests every year.

              I think part of the problem is that K-12 teachers no longer have the time allotted in their curriculum to teach the early stages of research, assimilation of ideas, and original writing. By the time the student gets to college, the whole concept is way too intimidating for some of them. They will spend more time and even money attempting to cheat than make the effort to do their own work because they are afraid of attempting the process. Perhaps they are even convinced by this time that they can't do it.

              Deborah
              ________________________________
              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kent Morris [km52@...]
              Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 12:42 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't comprehend....



              George--

              I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
              "student body files"...

              This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of 35)
              submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any citations...I
              usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right way
              instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance, three
              of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
              submitted...

              Thank you for all your thoughts...

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
              To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
              Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:52 AM
              Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
              comprehend....

              Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For
              what it's worth, here's my take.
              The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching,
              but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual
              property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this
              fits in conjunction with the first amendment. So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
              I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related
              to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the
              article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a
              back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the
              I-Phone. Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
              Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording
              in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability
              somehow.
              I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on
              this.
              ~ ~ ~
              Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet
              (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final
              exam of an ex-student. It was obvious, as one final after another had
              precisely the same wording on the short answer portion. The attitude seems
              to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points). Not quite the same thing as
              plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
              G

              Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@...<mailto:km52%40att.net> kenthm52
              Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

              Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
              and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
              regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
              To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
              Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
              Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
              comprehend....

              Here we go again!
              (George Thomas)

              New York Times, August 1, 2010

              Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
              By Trip Gabriel
              At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site�s
              frequently asked questions page about homelessness � and did not think he
              needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
              author information.

              At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student�s copying was the purple
              shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
              writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive � he just
              wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
              And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
              Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries �
              unsigned and collectively written � did not need to be credited since they
              counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
              Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
              credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
              much left it at that.
              But these cases � typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
              responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
              plagiarism � suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
              they did not write is a serious misdeed.
              It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
              intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
              unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
              plagiarism.
              Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
              the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students � who came
              of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking � understand the
              concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
              �Now we have a whole generation of students who�ve grown up with information
              that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn�t seem to
              have an author,� said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
              Integrity at Clemson University. �It�s possible to believe this information
              is just out there for anyone to take.�
              Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it � many are
              champions of academic honesty on their campuses � but rather try to
              understand why it is so widespread.
              In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
              for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
              40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
              written assignments.
              Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
              constitutes �serious cheating� is declining � to 29 percent on average in
              recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
              Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
              of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
              �This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
              property don�t have the same gravity,� said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
              older than most undergraduates. �When you�re sitting at your computer, it�s
              the same machine you�ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
              machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.�
              Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
              between researching in the stacks and online. �Because you�re not walking
              into a library, you�re not physically holding the article, which takes you
              closer to �this doesn�t belong to me,� � she said. Online, �everything can
              belong to you really easily.�
              A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
              high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
              authorship and the written word, or �texts� in Ms. Blum�s academic language.
              She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
              �Today�s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
              and the people who create them and who quote them,� she wrote last year in
              the book �My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,� published by Cornell
              University Press.
              Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
              pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today � TV shows that
              constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
              songs.
              In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
              creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
              It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
              secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
              �Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
              may be waning,� Ms. Blum said.
              She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
              and authentic identity � as their 1960s counterparts were � than in trying
              on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
              �If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
              then it�s O.K. if you say other people�s words, it�s O.K. if you say things
              you don�t believe, it�s O.K. if you write papers you couldn�t care less
              about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
              getting a grade,� Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. �And it�s O.K.
              if you put words out there without getting any credit.�
              The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
              from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
              brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
              whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
              passages lifted from others.
              Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, �There�s no
              such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.� A few critics rose to
              her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
              not win).
              That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
              University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards �does not foster
              creativity, it fosters laziness.�
              �You�re not coming up with new ideas if you�re grabbing and mixing and
              matching,� said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
              her student newspaper headlined �Generation Plagiarism.�
              �It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
              people � authors and artists and scholars � who are doing original work,�
              Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. �It�s kind of an insult that that ideal
              is gone, and now we�re left only to make collages of the work of previous
              generations.�
              In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
              informal editor of other students� papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
              has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
              The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
              unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
              �If you�re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
              own original argument in middle and high school, you�re not going to be
              tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won�t do so
              unknowingly,� she said.
              At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
              to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
              ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
              Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
              campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied � knowing it was
              wrong � who were �unwilling to engage the writing process.�
              �Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,� he said.
              And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation�s
              evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
              Dudley�s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
              one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
              would not happen again.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------------------------------

              Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
              Groups Links

              __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
              database 5338 (20100803) __________

              The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

              http://www.eset.com

              __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5344 (20100805) __________

              The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

              http://www.eset.com





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kent Morris
              interesting insights... ... From: Deborah Shepherd To: Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 11:30 AM
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 5, 2010
              • 0 Attachment
                interesting insights...
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
                To: <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 11:30 AM
                Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                comprehend....


                I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do change
                up my essay questions on tests every year.

                I think part of the problem is that K-12 teachers no longer have the time
                allotted in their curriculum to teach the early stages of research,
                assimilation of ideas, and original writing. By the time the student gets to
                college, the whole concept is way too intimidating for some of them. They
                will spend more time and even money attempting to cheat than make the effort
                to do their own work because they are afraid of attempting the process.
                Perhaps they are even convinced by this time that they can't do it.

                Deborah
                ________________________________
                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kent
                Morris [km52@...]
                Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 12:42 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                comprehend....



                George--

                I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
                "student body files"...

                This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of 35)
                submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any citations...I
                usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right way
                instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance, three
                of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
                submitted...

                Thank you for all your thoughts...

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "George Thomas"
                <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:52 AM
                Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                comprehend....

                Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For
                what it's worth, here's my take.
                The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching,
                but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual
                property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this
                fits in conjunction with the first amendment. So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
                I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related
                to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the
                article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a
                back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the
                I-Phone. Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
                Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording
                in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability
                somehow.
                I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on
                this.
                ~ ~ ~
                Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet
                (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final
                exam of an ex-student. It was obvious, as one final after another had
                precisely the same wording on the short answer portion. The attitude seems
                to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points). Not quite the same thing as
                plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
                G

                Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@...<mailto:km52%40att.net> kenthm52
                Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

                Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
                and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
                regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "George Thomas"
                <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
                Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                comprehend....

                Here we go again!
                (George Thomas)

                New York Times, August 1, 2010

                Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
                By Trip Gabriel
                At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site's
                frequently asked questions page about homelessness - and did not think he
                needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
                author information.

                At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student's copying was the purple
                shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
                writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive - he just
                wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
                And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
                Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries -
                unsigned and collectively written - did not need to be credited since they
                counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
                Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
                credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
                much left it at that.
                But these cases - typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
                responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
                plagiarism - suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
                they did not write is a serious misdeed.
                It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
                intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
                unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
                plagiarism.
                Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
                the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students - who came
                of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking - understand the
                concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
                "Now we have a whole generation of students who've grown up with information
                that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn't seem to
                have an author," said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
                Integrity at Clemson University. "It's possible to believe this information
                is just out there for anyone to take."
                Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it - many are
                champions of academic honesty on their campuses - but rather try to
                understand why it is so widespread.
                In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
                for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
                40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
                written assignments.
                Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
                constitutes "serious cheating" is declining - to 29 percent on average in
                recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
                Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
                of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
                "This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
                property don't have the same gravity," said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
                older than most undergraduates. "When you're sitting at your computer, it's
                the same machine you've downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
                machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night."
                Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
                between researching in the stacks and online. "Because you're not walking
                into a library, you're not physically holding the article, which takes you
                closer to 'this doesn't belong to me,' " she said. Online, "everything can
                belong to you really easily."
                A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
                high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
                authorship and the written word, or "texts" in Ms. Blum's academic language.
                She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
                "Today's students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
                and the people who create them and who quote them," she wrote last year in
                the book "My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture," published by Cornell
                University Press.
                Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
                pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today - TV shows that
                constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
                songs.
                In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
                creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
                It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
                secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
                "Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
                may be waning," Ms. Blum said.
                She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
                and authentic identity - as their 1960s counterparts were - than in trying
                on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
                "If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
                then it's O.K. if you say other people's words, it's O.K. if you say things
                you don't believe, it's O.K. if you write papers you couldn't care less
                about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
                getting a grade," Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. "And it's O.K.
                if you put words out there without getting any credit."
                The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
                from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
                brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
                whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
                passages lifted from others.
                Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, "There's no
                such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity." A few critics rose to
                her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
                not win).
                That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
                University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards "does not foster
                creativity, it fosters laziness."
                "You're not coming up with new ideas if you're grabbing and mixing and
                matching," said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
                her student newspaper headlined "Generation Plagiarism."
                "It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
                people - authors and artists and scholars - who are doing original work,"
                Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. "It's kind of an insult that that ideal
                is gone, and now we're left only to make collages of the work of previous
                generations."
                In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
                informal editor of other students' papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
                has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
                The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
                unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
                "If you're taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
                own original argument in middle and high school, you're not going to be
                tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won't do so
                unknowingly," she said.
                At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
                to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
                ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
                Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
                campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied - knowing it was
                wrong - who were "unwilling to engage the writing process."
                "Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice," he said.
                And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation's
                evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
                Dudley's office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
                one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
                would not happen again.

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                ------------------------------------

                Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
                Groups Links

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                database 5338 (20100803) __________

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                database 5344 (20100805) __________

                The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                http://www.eset.com





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

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                Groups Links




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                database 5344 (20100805) __________

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                http://www.eset.com




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                The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                http://www.eset.com
              • Andrew J Petto
                And add to that the disincentive for teaching more than (or other than) what will appear on the incompetency exams. I though that NCLB was bad, but Obama s
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 5, 2010
                • 0 Attachment
                  And add to that the disincentive for teaching more than (or other than) what will appear on the incompetency exams. I though that NCLB was bad, but Obama's administration seems to want to go Bush one better with Race to the Top. So, passing the exam becomes the goal (for both the teacher and the student); rather than having learning as the goal and passing the exam as a way to assess how well students are learning.

                  Anj

                  ------------
                  Andrew J Petto, PhD
                  Senior Lecturer
                  Department of Biological Sciences
                  University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                  PO Box 413
                  Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                  CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                  Telephone: 414-229-6784
                  FAX: 414-229-3926
                  https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                  *************
                  Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                  https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                  *************

                  "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

                  -- Pat Conroy
                  The Prince of Tides

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, August 5, 2010 1:30:25 PM
                  Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't comprehend....

                  I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do change up my essay questions on tests every year.

                  I think part of the problem is that K-12 teachers no longer have the time allotted in their curriculum to teach the early stages of research, assimilation of ideas, and original writing. By the time the student gets to college, the whole concept is way too intimidating for some of them. They will spend more time and even money attempting to cheat than make the effort to do their own work because they are afraid of attempting the process. Perhaps they are even convinced by this time that they can't do it.

                  Deborah
                  ________________________________
                  From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kent Morris [km52@...]
                  Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 12:42 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't comprehend....



                  George--

                  I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
                  "student body files"...

                  This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of 35)
                  submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any citations...I
                  usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right way
                  instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance, three
                  of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
                  submitted...

                  Thank you for all your thoughts...

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                  To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                  Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:52 AM
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                  comprehend....

                  Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For
                  what it's worth, here's my take.
                  The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching,
                  but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual
                  property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this
                  fits in conjunction with the first amendment. So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
                  I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related
                  to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the
                  article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a
                  back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the
                  I-Phone. Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
                  Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording
                  in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability
                  somehow.
                  I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on
                  this.
                  ~ ~ ~
                  Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet
                  (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final
                  exam of an ex-student. It was obvious, as one final after another had
                  precisely the same wording on the short answer portion. The attitude seems
                  to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points). Not quite the same thing as
                  plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
                  G

                  Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@...<mailto:km52%40att.net> kenthm52
                  Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

                  Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
                  and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
                  regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                  To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                  Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                  comprehend....

                  Here we go again!
                  (George Thomas)

                  New York Times, August 1, 2010

                  Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
                  By Trip Gabriel
                  At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site�s
                  frequently asked questions page about homelessness � and did not think he
                  needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
                  author information.

                  At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student�s copying was the purple
                  shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
                  writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive � he just
                  wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
                  And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
                  Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries �
                  unsigned and collectively written � did not need to be credited since they
                  counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
                  Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
                  credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
                  much left it at that.
                  But these cases � typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
                  responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
                  plagiarism � suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
                  they did not write is a serious misdeed.
                  It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
                  intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
                  unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
                  plagiarism.
                  Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
                  the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students � who came
                  of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking � understand the
                  concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
                  �Now we have a whole generation of students who�ve grown up with information
                  that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn�t seem to
                  have an author,� said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
                  Integrity at Clemson University. �It�s possible to believe this information
                  is just out there for anyone to take.�
                  Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it � many are
                  champions of academic honesty on their campuses � but rather try to
                  understand why it is so widespread.
                  In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
                  for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
                  40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
                  written assignments.
                  Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
                  constitutes �serious cheating� is declining � to 29 percent on average in
                  recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
                  Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
                  of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
                  �This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
                  property don�t have the same gravity,� said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
                  older than most undergraduates. �When you�re sitting at your computer, it�s
                  the same machine you�ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
                  machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.�
                  Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
                  between researching in the stacks and online. �Because you�re not walking
                  into a library, you�re not physically holding the article, which takes you
                  closer to �this doesn�t belong to me,� � she said. Online, �everything can
                  belong to you really easily.�
                  A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
                  high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
                  authorship and the written word, or �texts� in Ms. Blum�s academic language.
                  She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
                  �Today�s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
                  and the people who create them and who quote them,� she wrote last year in
                  the book �My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,� published by Cornell
                  University Press.
                  Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
                  pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today � TV shows that
                  constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
                  songs.
                  In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
                  creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
                  It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
                  secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
                  �Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
                  may be waning,� Ms. Blum said.
                  She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
                  and authentic identity � as their 1960s counterparts were � than in trying
                  on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
                  �If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
                  then it�s O.K. if you say other people�s words, it�s O.K. if you say things
                  you don�t believe, it�s O.K. if you write papers you couldn�t care less
                  about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
                  getting a grade,� Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. �And it�s O.K.
                  if you put words out there without getting any credit.�
                  The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
                  from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
                  brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
                  whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
                  passages lifted from others.
                  Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, �There�s no
                  such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.� A few critics rose to
                  her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
                  not win).
                  That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
                  University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards �does not foster
                  creativity, it fosters laziness.�
                  �You�re not coming up with new ideas if you�re grabbing and mixing and
                  matching,� said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
                  her student newspaper headlined �Generation Plagiarism.�
                  �It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
                  people � authors and artists and scholars � who are doing original work,�
                  Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. �It�s kind of an insult that that ideal
                  is gone, and now we�re left only to make collages of the work of previous
                  generations.�
                  In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
                  informal editor of other students� papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
                  has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
                  The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
                  unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
                  �If you�re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
                  own original argument in middle and high school, you�re not going to be
                  tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won�t do so
                  unknowingly,� she said.
                  At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
                  to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
                  ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
                  Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
                  campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied � knowing it was
                  wrong � who were �unwilling to engage the writing process.�
                  �Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,� he said.
                  And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation�s
                  evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
                  Dudley�s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
                  one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
                  would not happen again.

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  ------------------------------------

                  Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
                  Groups Links

                  __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature
                  database 5338 (20100803) __________

                  The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                  http://www.eset.com

                  __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 5344 (20100805) __________

                  The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                  http://www.eset.com





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  ------------------------------------

                  Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo! Groups Links
                • mep1mep
                  I could not agree more.  Here in Texas, where we led the way with this thinking, I can tell students have had significantly different public school
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 5, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    I could not agree more.  Here in Texas, where we led the way with this thinking,
                    I can tell students have had significantly different public school experiences
                    then when I first started teaching.  Much to my dismay, Obama made it clear
                    throughout his campaign that his education policy would be a more intense Bush
                    strategy.  It sickens me to think what the next years will bring to our
                    classrooms.  I take heart from the students who show up hungry for a bit of
                    intellectual stimulation and excited to get it.  As I said, I just wish more of
                    us felt this way.

                    Pam




                    ________________________________
                    From: Andrew J Petto <ajpetto@...>
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thu, August 5, 2010 9:27:49 PM
                    Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                    comprehend....

                     
                    And add to that the disincentive for teaching more than (or other than) what
                    will appear on the incompetency exams. I though that NCLB was bad, but Obama's
                    administration seems to want to go Bush one better with Race to the Top. So,
                    passing the exam becomes the goal (for both the teacher and the student); rather
                    than having learning as the goal and passing the exam as a way to assess how
                    well students are learning.


                    Anj

                    ------------
                    Andrew J Petto, PhD
                    Senior Lecturer
                    Department of Biological Sciences
                    University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                    PO Box 413
                    Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                    CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                    Telephone: 414-229-6784
                    FAX: 414-229-3926
                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                    *************
                    Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                    *************

                    "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My
                    heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

                    -- Pat Conroy
                    The Prince of Tides

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, August 5, 2010 1:30:25 PM
                    Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                    comprehend....

                    I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do change up
                    my essay questions on tests every year.

                    I think part of the problem is that K-12 teachers no longer have the time
                    allotted in their curriculum to teach the early stages of research, assimilation
                    of ideas, and original writing. By the time the student gets to college, the
                    whole concept is way too intimidating for some of them. They will spend more
                    time and even money attempting to cheat than make the effort to do their own
                    work because they are afraid of attempting the process. Perhaps they are even
                    convinced by this time that they can't do it.

                    Deborah
                    ________________________________
                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Kent Morris
                    [km52@...]
                    Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 12:42 PM
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                    comprehend....

                    George--

                    I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
                    "student body files"...

                    This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of 35)
                    submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any citations...I
                    usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right way
                    instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance, three
                    of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
                    submitted...

                    Thank you for all your thoughts...

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                    To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:52 AM
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                    comprehend....

                    Those truly are the questions, loaded with all kinds of implications. For
                    what it's worth, here's my take.
                    The Times article embodies the attitude I encounter not only in teaching,
                    but in society generally. It truly is theft, and it relates to intellectual
                    property matters, but there's a fundamental misunderstanding of where this
                    fits in conjunction with the first amendment. So, to sum it up, "OUCH."
                    I suspect plagiarism is more common than in the past, and it seems related
                    to the nature of "data" as students (and per the example at the end of the
                    article, parents!!) view it. Accountability for ideas/expression takes a
                    back seat when everyone now can publish garbage and earn royalties thru the
                    I-Phone. Heck, why not devalue grades as well?
                    Either information will become an untraceable mess of free ideas and wording
                    in this "new digital age," or we'll find ways to retain accountability
                    somehow.
                    I hope someone ELSE listening in here can come up with a better "take" on
                    this.
                    ~ ~ ~
                    Just this past session more than half of my students exchanged a crib sheet
                    (the "student body" keeps files!), the "short answer" page off the final
                    exam of an ex-student. It was obvious, as one final after another had
                    precisely the same wording on the short answer portion. The attitude seems
                    to be, so what? (They all lost those 20 points). Not quite the same thing as
                    plagiarism, but very close to the same idea.
                    G

                    Posted by: "Kent Morris" km52@...<mailto:km52%40att.net> kenthm52
                    Date: Tue Aug 3, 2010 8:59 pm ((PDT))

                    Do you think that plagiarism is more common today than it was in the past,
                    and if so, do you think that universities will soon give in to re-writing
                    regulations re plagiarism in favor of this new digital age we live in?
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "George Thomas" <broruprecht@...<mailto:broruprecht%40yahoo.com>>
                    To: <sacc-l@yahoogroups.com<mailto:sacc-l%40yahoogroups.com>>
                    Sent: Monday, August 02, 2010 11:27 AM
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                    comprehend....

                    Here we go again!
                    (George Thomas)

                    New York Times, August 1, 2010

                    Plagiarism Lines Blur for Students in Digital Age
                    By Trip Gabriel
                    At Rhode Island College, a freshman copied and pasted from a Web site�s
                    frequently asked questions page about homelessness � and did not think he
                    needed to credit a source in his assignment because the page did not include
                    author information.

                    At DePaul University, the tip-off to one student�s copying was the purple
                    shade of several paragraphs he had lifted from the Web; when confronted by a
                    writing tutor his professor had sent him to, he was not defensive � he just
                    wanted to know how to change purple text to black.
                    And at the University of Maryland, a student reprimanded for copying from
                    Wikipedia in a paper on the Great Depression said he thought its entries �
                    unsigned and collectively written � did not need to be credited since they
                    counted, essentially, as common knowledge.
                    Professors used to deal with plagiarism by admonishing students to give
                    credit to others and to follow the style guide for citations, and pretty
                    much left it at that.
                    But these cases � typical ones, according to writing tutors and officials
                    responsible for discipline at the three schools who described the
                    plagiarism � suggest that many students simply do not grasp that using words
                    they did not write is a serious misdeed.
                    It is a disconnect that is growing in the Internet age as concepts of
                    intellectual property, copyright and originality are under assault in the
                    unbridled exchange of online information, say educators who study
                    plagiarism.
                    Digital technology makes copying and pasting easy, of course. But that is
                    the least of it. The Internet may also be redefining how students � who came
                    of age with music file-sharing, Wikipedia and Web-linking � understand the
                    concept of authorship and the singularity of any text or image.
                    �Now we have a whole generation of students who�ve grown up with information
                    that just seems to be hanging out there in cyberspace and doesn�t seem to
                    have an author,� said Teresa Fishman, director of the Center for Academic
                    Integrity at Clemson University. �It�s possible to believe this information
                    is just out there for anyone to take.�
                    Professors who have studied plagiarism do not try to excuse it � many are
                    champions of academic honesty on their campuses � but rather try to
                    understand why it is so widespread.
                    In surveys from 2006 to 2010 by Donald L. McCabe, a co-founder of the Center
                    for Academic Integrity and a business professor at Rutgers University, about
                    40 percent of 14,000 undergraduates admitted to copying a few sentences in
                    written assignments.
                    Perhaps more significant, the number who believed that copying from the Web
                    constitutes �serious cheating� is declining � to 29 percent on average in
                    recent surveys from 34 percent earlier in the decade.
                    Sarah Brookover, a senior at the Rutgers campus in Camden, N.J., said many
                    of her classmates blithely cut and paste without attribution.
                    �This generation has always existed in a world where media and intellectual
                    property don�t have the same gravity,� said Ms. Brookover, who at 31 is
                    older than most undergraduates. �When you�re sitting at your computer, it�s
                    the same machine you�ve downloaded music with, possibly illegally, the same
                    machine you streamed videos for free that showed on HBO last night.�
                    Ms. Brookover, who works at the campus library, has pondered the differences
                    between researching in the stacks and online. �Because you�re not walking
                    into a library, you�re not physically holding the article, which takes you
                    closer to �this doesn�t belong to me,� � she said. Online, �everything can
                    belong to you really easily.�
                    A University of Notre Dame anthropologist, Susan D. Blum, disturbed by the
                    high rates of reported plagiarism, set out to understand how students view
                    authorship and the written word, or �texts� in Ms. Blum�s academic language.
                    She conducted her ethnographic research among 234 Notre Dame undergraduates.
                    �Today�s students stand at the crossroads of a new way of conceiving texts
                    and the people who create them and who quote them,� she wrote last year in
                    the book �My Word!: Plagiarism and College Culture,� published by Cornell
                    University Press.
                    Ms. Blum argued that student writing exhibits some of the same qualities of
                    pastiche that drive other creative endeavors today � TV shows that
                    constantly reference other shows or rap music that samples from earlier
                    songs.
                    In an interview, she said the idea of an author whose singular effort
                    creates an original work is rooted in Enlightenment ideas of the individual.
                    It is buttressed by the Western concept of intellectual property rights as
                    secured by copyright law. But both traditions are being challenged.
                    �Our notion of authorship and originality was born, it flourished, and it
                    may be waning,� Ms. Blum said.
                    She contends that undergraduates are less interested in cultivating a unique
                    and authentic identity � as their 1960s counterparts were � than in trying
                    on many different personas, which the Web enables with social networking.
                    �If you are not so worried about presenting yourself as absolutely unique,
                    then it�s O.K. if you say other people�s words, it�s O.K. if you say things
                    you don�t believe, it�s O.K. if you write papers you couldn�t care less
                    about because they accomplish the task, which is turning something in and
                    getting a grade,� Ms. Blum said, voicing student attitudes. �And it�s O.K.
                    if you put words out there without getting any credit.�
                    The notion that there might be a new model young person, who freely borrows
                    from the vortex of information to mash up a new creative work, fueled a
                    brief brouhaha earlier this year with Helene Hegemann, a German teenager
                    whose best-selling novel about Berlin club life turned out to include
                    passages lifted from others.
                    Instead of offering an abject apology, Ms. Hegemann insisted, �There�s no
                    such thing as originality anyway, just authenticity.� A few critics rose to
                    her defense, and the book remained a finalist for a fiction prize (but did
                    not win).
                    That theory does not wash with Sarah Wilensky, a senior at Indiana
                    University, who said that relaxing plagiarism standards �does not foster
                    creativity, it fosters laziness.�
                    �You�re not coming up with new ideas if you�re grabbing and mixing and
                    matching,� said Ms. Wilensky, who took aim at Ms. Hegemann in a column in
                    her student newspaper headlined �Generation Plagiarism.�
                    �It may be increasingly accepted, but there are still plenty of creative
                    people � authors and artists and scholars � who are doing original work,�
                    Ms. Wilensky said in an interview. �It�s kind of an insult that that ideal
                    is gone, and now we�re left only to make collages of the work of previous
                    generations.�
                    In the view of Ms. Wilensky, whose writing skills earned her the role of
                    informal editor of other students� papers in her freshman dorm, plagiarism
                    has nothing to do with trendy academic theories.
                    The main reason it occurs, she said, is because students leave high school
                    unprepared for the intellectual rigors of college writing.
                    �If you�re taught how to closely read sources and synthesize them into your
                    own original argument in middle and high school, you�re not going to be
                    tempted to plagiarize in college, and you certainly won�t do so
                    unknowingly,� she said.
                    At the University of California, Davis, of the 196 plagiarism cases referred
                    to the disciplinary office last year, a majority did not involve students
                    ignorant of the need to credit the writing of others.
                    Many times, said Donald J. Dudley, who oversees the discipline office on the
                    campus of 32,000, it was students who intentionally copied � knowing it was
                    wrong � who were �unwilling to engage the writing process.�
                    �Writing is difficult, and doing it well takes time and practice,� he said.
                    And then there was a case that had nothing to do with a younger generation�s
                    evolving view of authorship. A student accused of plagiarism came to Mr.
                    Dudley�s office with her parents, and the father admitted that he was the
                    one responsible for the plagiarism. The wife assured Mr. Dudley that it
                    would not happen again.

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                  • George Thomas
                    This gives me an (inadequate) idea -- The facility where I teach has that aforementioned inadequate library.  Why not survey what the library actually has,
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 7, 2010
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                      This gives me an (inadequate) idea -- The "facility" where I teach has that aforementioned inadequate library.  Why not survey what the library actually has, get some idea as to what topics might survive the use of that library in student "research", and assign tiny, structured papers not necessarily on topics in anthropology.  (The fact that it's sometimes hard to find a topic without anthropological relevance might be instructive).  Even in such a case I might find that there are barriers to use.  But the up-side would be some exposure to (1) get biblio from library, (2) organize ideas, (3) write, and (4) gain experience going through motions.
                      Some discussion at SACC-Fests on ways to structure written assignments could be interesting.
                      On the other hand, as someone pointed out earlier, much of what students need was failed them in early elementary school/middle school.
                      There have been a few students who appeared to have genuine interest, potential, and even a writing background, so it's not unheard-of for me to stay in this position for a while.  A while longer will lead me to conclude whether this position and its experimental (?) potential is worth it to me.  Soon... perhaps an application or two....  I could find that my grasp of modern research materials has atrophied.  Computers of course, library facilities, and sometimes even appropriate anthro movies have been nixed. 
                      Oh well........:-)
                      G
                       
                      Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don'tcomprehend....
                          Posted by: "Dianne C" dianneky@... metkalmetkal
                          Date: Fri Aug 6, 2010 2:55 pm ((PDT))


                      One of my colleagues gave an interesting assignment.  They had to choose a topic from the text, then choose a reference to research.  They had to start with the bibliography of the textbook; find the article, journal, whatever; read the article; and write a brief summary of the article and compare their summary to what was in the text.  She said it went well but that the librarians asked for warning the next time.  A lot of the students ended up in the library asking for help in searching for the article.  (credit to Dr. Elizabeth Purcell)

                      --Dianne Chidester

                      > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      > CC: deborah.shepherd@...
                      > From: ajpetto@...
                      > Date: Fri, 6 Aug 2010 13:54:37 -0500
                      > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don'tcomprehend....
                      >
                      > In addition, a rhetorical analysis is a powerful tool, because it
                      > emphasizes paying critical attention to the context of the information
                      > -- who publishes it, for whom, what (if any) is the mission of the
                      > publication or its sponsoring organization, how is the material
                      > organized, presented, verified, and so on.
                      >
                      > This source is not bad:
                      > http://www.writingcentre.ubc.ca/workshop/tools/rhet1.htm
                      >
                      > Anj
                      >
                      > On 2010-08-06 11:28, Deborah Shepherd wrote:
                      > > Creating a bibliography a really good assignment in lieu of a term paper.
                      > >
                      > > Being critical about sources is a hard concept for some of my students. Or else, if the topic offends their religious beliefs in any way, they want to reject every source that doesn't agree with their views.
                      > >
                      > > I always tell my students that when doing research, finding your bibliography and using it is more than half the work. For me, it's at least 80% of the work. Once you know what you will be writing about, the writing is the easy part. Writing is only hard when you don't know what you want to communicate. I see many shocked faces when I say such things.  :)
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Philip Stein [stein39@...]
                      > > Sent: Friday, August 06, 2010 7:20 AM
                      > > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                      > > Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don'tcomprehend....
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > I also assign very structured papers that cannot simply be purchased or "borrowed" from a fellow student. In my honors class I have the students select a topic randomly and produce an annotated bibliography and a short abstract. The focus is on research skills and an introduction to the anthropology literature. The major challenge is to show them that there is a lot of cr*p on the Internet. I try to teach them how to distinguish good from bad information. They seem to feel that if it is on the Internet or published in a book is must be good information.
                      > >
                      > > --- On Thu, 8/5/10, Deborah Shepherd<deborah.shepherd@...<mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>>  wrote:
                      > >
                      > > From: Deborah Shepherd<deborah.shepherd@...<mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>>
                      > > Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don'tcomprehend....
                      > > To: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>"<SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>>
                      > > Date: Thursday, August 5, 2010, 4:43 PM
                      > >
                      > > I think standard term papers are over-rated unless someone is planning on going to graduate school. Some students can write them already, but others simply don't know where to begin. I like to create more intricate though regimented assignments, still involving some research, where students know from the outset that there is nothing out there that they can copy or buy which will earn them any points. What I assign teaches them, I hope and intend, how to begin. Those students who do know how to do it still get a meaningful assignment. The others are ready for the next step and might even write a term paper of their own down the road. At least, I don't find nearly as many attempts at cheating as I used to find.
                      > >
                      > > Deborah
                      > >
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>  [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Bob Muckle [bmuckle@...<mailto:bmuckle%40capilanou.ca>]
                      > > Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 2:17 PM
                      > > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don'tcomprehend....
                      > >
                      > > If we don't teach them, who will?
                      > >
                      > > Bob
                      > >
                      > >   
                      > >>>> Deborah Shepherd<deborah.shepherd@...<mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu><mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>>  08/05/10 11:36
                      > >>>>         
                      > > AM>>>
                      > > I find that it is no longer possible to assign term papers, and I do
                      > > change up my essay questions on tests every year.
                      > >
                      > > I think part of the problem is that K-12 teachers no longer have the
                      > > time allotted in their curriculum to teach the early stages of research,
                      > > assimilation of ideas, and original writing. By the time the student
                      > > gets to college, the whole concept is way too intimidating for some of
                      > > them. They will spend more time and even money attempting to cheat than
                      > > make the effort to do their own work because they are afraid of
                      > > attempting the process. Perhaps they are even convinced by this time
                      > > that they can't do it.
                      > >
                      > > Deborah
                      > > ________________________________
                      > > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>  [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>] On Behalf Of Kent
                      > > Morris [km52@...<mailto:km52%40att.net><mailto:km52%40att.net>]
                      > > Sent: Thursday, August 05, 2010 12:42 PM
                      > > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com<mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com><mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Re: Plagiarism (Again)-Some students simply don't
                      > > comprehend....
                      > >
                      > > George--
                      > >
                      > > I've also wondered if any of my quizzes/midterm/final exams are part of
                      > > "student body files"...
                      > >
                      > > This past summer school session, I had five or six term papers (out of
                      > > 35)
                      > > submitted that were for the most part copied, and without any
                      > > citations...I
                      > > usually like to give a student another chance to do something the right
                      > > way
                      > > instead of awarding a lower grade, but even after given this chance,
                      > > three
                      > > of them still submitted more or less the same term paper previously
                      > > submitted...
                      > >
                      > > Thank you for all your thoughts...
                      > >





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