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archaeology and oil

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  • Bob Muckle
    After every disaster, there is usually a lag time of a week or so before we start seeing the impact on archaeological resources. I understand the lag time, and
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 3, 2010
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      After every disaster, there is usually a lag time of a week or so before we start seeing the impact on archaeological resources. I understand the lag time, and was beginning to wonder why it was taking so long regarding the Gulf oil spill. I am glad to see that the National Park Service has now reported on it. Or at least recognized the potential impact to archaeological sites.

      I like the way the NPS mentions that they have a good idea what to do now, based on their experience with the Exxon Valdez spill in Alaska. I remember working on a project in Alaska several years after the spill. One of the silver linings in things like this, is that there will probably be a lot of archaeological sites that were not previously recorded, recorded.

      The NPS response isl at http://bit.ly/doioil It has a link to the report on the Exxon spill, which I haven't yet, but am looking forward to reading.

      I'm now heading off to do some fieldwork. I am very fortunate that my field location, which can seem likee a million miles away, is only 20 minutes from my campus. Mind you, I do need a 4-wheel drive for part of the journey. Remember, for those interested in west coast historic archaeology, field schools, and such, a student is writing a pretty good blog about the field school. http://archaeologyfieldschool.blogspot.com

      Bob
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