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RE: [SACC-L] is it mean?

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  • Lori Barkley
    OK, so this shows how far I am behind in my emails, but here is a great poem from a Canadian working in academe that speaks directly to this. Enjoy! (I like
    Message 1 of 19 , May 10, 2010
      OK, so this shows how far I am behind in my emails, but here is a great
      poem from a Canadian working in academe that speaks directly to this.
      Enjoy! (I like to quote from it during the semester...) Hope to see
      you in Puerto Rico!
      Lori


      Did I Miss Anything?
      Tom Wayman

      Nothing. When we realized you weren’t here
      we sat with our hands folded on our desks
      in silence, for the full two hours
      Everything. I gave an exam worth
      40 percent of the grade for this term
      and assigned some reading due today
      on which I’m about to hand out a quiz
      worth 50 percent
      Nothing. None of the content of this course
      has value or meaning
      Take as many days off as you like:
      any activities we undertake as a class
      I assure you will not matter either to you or me
      and are without purpose
      Everything. A few minutes after we began last time
      a shaft of light suddenly descended and an angel
      or other heavenly being appeared
      and revealed to us what each woman or man must do
      to attain divine wisdom in this life and
      the hereafter
      This is the last time the class will meet
      before we disperse to bring the good news to all people
      on earth.
      Nothing. When you are not present
      how could something significant occur?
      Everything. Contained in this classroom
      is a microcosm of human experience
      assembled for you to query and examine and ponder
      This is not the only place such an opportunity has been
      gathered
      but it was one place
      And you weren’t here



      >>> "Lynch, Brian M" <blynch@...> 02/04/2010 5:40 pm >>>



      This reminds me of my own gut feeling when a student, who hasn't been
      to class for a week or more, comes to me very sincerely and matter of
      factly and says "Sorry I wasn't here... I had to ________(fill in the
      blank). Can you tell me what I missed?" (or "Did I miss anything?") Deep
      inside I am tempted to say "No, since you weren't here we didn't do
      anything in your absence." It is frustrating, and sometimes very
      discouraging, to realize that a student might so off-handedly expect a
      five minute catch-up on something that I might have prepared for hours,
      and which took maybe three hours (or more) to explore in class.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Chuck & Gail Ellenbaum
      This is priceless. But to some of our more entitled students, the sarcasm might pass by unrealized. Chuck Ellenbaum ... [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 19 , May 10, 2010
        This is priceless. But to some of our more "entitled" students, the
        sarcasm might pass by unrealized.

        Chuck Ellenbaum ><>

        On May 10, 2010, at 1:11 PM, Lori Barkley wrote:

        > OK, so this shows how far I am behind in my emails, but here is a
        > great
        > poem from a Canadian working in academe that speaks directly to this.
        > Enjoy! (I like to quote from it during the semester...) Hope to see
        > you in Puerto Rico!
        > Lori
        >
        >
        > Did I Miss Anything?
        > Tom Wayman
        >
        > Nothing. When we realized you weren�t here
        > we sat with our hands folded on our desks
        > in silence, for the full two hours
        > Everything. I gave an exam worth
        > 40 percent of the grade for this term
        > and assigned some reading due today
        > on which I�m about to hand out a quiz
        > worth 50 percent
        > Nothing. None of the content of this course
        > has value or meaning
        > Take as many days off as you like:
        > any activities we undertake as a class
        > I assure you will not matter either to you or me
        > and are without purpose
        > Everything. A few minutes after we began last time
        > a shaft of light suddenly descended and an angel
        > or other heavenly being appeared
        > and revealed to us what each woman or man must do
        > to attain divine wisdom in this life and
        > the hereafter
        > This is the last time the class will meet
        > before we disperse to bring the good news to all people
        > on earth.
        > Nothing. When you are not present
        > how could something significant occur?
        > Everything. Contained in this classroom
        > is a microcosm of human experience
        > assembled for you to query and examine and ponder
        > This is not the only place such an opportunity has been
        > gathered
        > but it was one place
        > And you weren�t here
        >
        >
        > >>> "Lynch, Brian M" <blynch@...> 02/04/2010 5:40 pm >>>
        >
        >
        > This reminds me of my own gut feeling when a student, who hasn't been
        > to class for a week or more, comes to me very sincerely and matter of
        > factly and says "Sorry I wasn't here... I had to ________(fill in the
        > blank). Can you tell me what I missed?" (or "Did I miss anything?")
        > Deep
        > inside I am tempted to say "No, since you weren't here we didn't do
        > anything in your absence." It is frustrating, and sometimes very
        > discouraging, to realize that a student might so off-handedly expect a
        > five minute catch-up on something that I might have prepared for
        > hours,
        > and which took maybe three hours (or more) to explore in class.
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • George Thomas
        Maybe there is (or isn t) a similarity between cultural and Gen-X-Entitled.   But since much of an intro course in anthro covers this topic, the most we
        Message 3 of 19 , May 11, 2010
          Maybe there is (or isn't) a similarity between "cultural" and "Gen-X-Entitled."  But since much of an intro course in anthro covers this topic, the most we can do is to clarify the rules, hit 'em over the head several times with those rules, all the while defining "adequate performance" is for a given class, then, if the "entitlement" thing continues, ....
          Flunk-em.
          Meanie
           
          Re: is it mean?
              Posted by: "Chuck & Gail Ellenbaum" ellenbaumbridge@... chuckellenbaum
              Date: Mon May 10, 2010 11:26 am ((PDT))

          This is priceless.  But to some of our more "entitled" students, the 
          sarcasm might pass by unrealized.

          Chuck Ellenbaum ><>

          On May 10, 2010, at 1:11 PM, Lori Barkley wrote:

          > OK, so this shows how far I am behind in my emails, but here is a 
          > great
          > poem from a Canadian working in academe that speaks directly to this.
          > Enjoy! (I like to quote from it during the semester...) Hope to see
          > you in Puerto Rico!
          > Lori
          >
          >
          > Did I Miss Anything?
          > Tom Wayman
          >
          > Nothing. When we realized you weren’t here
          > we sat with our hands folded on our desks
          > in silence, for the full two hours
          > Everything. I gave an exam worth
          > 40 percent of the grade for this term
          > and assigned some reading due today
          > on which I’m about to hand out a quiz
          > worth 50 percent
          > Nothing. None of the content of this course
          > has value or meaning
          > Take as many days off as you like:
          > any activities we undertake as a class
          > I assure you will not matter either to you or me
          > and are without purpose
          > Everything. A few minutes after we began last time
          > a shaft of light suddenly descended and an angel
          > or other heavenly being appeared
          > and revealed to us what each woman or man must do
          > to attain divine wisdom in this life and
          > the hereafter
          > This is the last time the class will meet
          > before we disperse to bring the good news to all people
          > on earth.
          > Nothing. When you are not present
          > how could something significant occur?
          > Everything. Contained in this classroom
          > is a microcosm of human experience
          > assembled for you to query and examine and ponder
          > This is not the only place such an opportunity has been
          > gathered
          > but it was one place
          > And you weren’t here
          >
          >
          > >>> "Lynch, Brian M" <blynch@...> 02/04/2010 5:40 pm >>>
          >
          >
          > This reminds me of my own gut feeling when a student, who hasn't been
          > to class for a week or more, comes to me very sincerely and matter of
          > factly and says "Sorry I wasn't here... I had to ________(fill in the
          > blank). Can you tell me what I missed?" (or "Did I miss anything?") 
          > Deep
          > inside I am tempted to say "No, since you weren't here we didn't do
          > anything in your absence." It is frustrating, and sometimes very
          > discouraging, to realize that a student might so off-handedly expect a
          > five minute catch-up on something that I might have prepared for 
          > hours,
          > and which took maybe three hours (or more) to explore in class.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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