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Re: [SACC-L] Re: Beer

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  • Bob Muckle
    As requested, the link to the world cup site: http://www.worldbeercup.org/ I am still trying to get my ahead around the fact that more than 3300 beers were
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 15 9:06 AM
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      As requested, the link to the world cup site: http://www.worldbeercup.org/

      I am still trying to get my ahead around the fact that more than 3300 beers were entered in the competition. Presumably these represent only a small fraction of the good beers that are actually out there in world of beer. I imagine there are many good breweries that don't even enter their most excellent of beers. Just think....one could drink a different one the entered beers every day for nine years.

      One of my biggest regrets while at the AAA meetings in Philadelphia this past December was that I didn't make it to that place that serves beers made from recipes dating to the 1700s.

      When I was telling my students upon return from my trip to the SACC meetings in San Francisco that I was at a place that had 68 different beers on tap, plus more of the bottled varieties, one student told me of a local pub that has more than 100 beers on tap. I doubt it, but it makes me happy to think about it. And I'm going to check it out. I'm getting tired of no sludge, or at least residue, in my beer.


      Today, one of things I am doing is working on my research design for my historic archaeology field project that starts up in a few weeks. I wonder if I should tap into (pun intended) the fact that over the past few years we have excavated quite a few beer bottles from the early 1900s. Maybe I could do some more research on the angle of beer consumption in local early 20th century logging camps. It kind of fits in with my lectures this week in which I am trying to inform my students about the many biases archaeologists have, including how we are biased by what is going on around us in the present (such as the World Cup of Beer).

      I don't have classes today, so I just might have a beer with my lunch.

      Bob




      >>> "tadmci" <tadm@...> 04/15/10 7:36 AM >>>
      Bob - can you send out the link to the World Cup of Beer site? ... for purely academic reasons, of course.

      Thanks!

      Tad

      --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Muckle" <bmuckle@...> wrote:
      >
      > Some of you who have me as a 'friend' or whatever on Facebook are likely aware that I have been giving some comments on some beers recently, particularly those with an 'archaeology' theme. As many people are aware, beer and archaeology are almost synomous. I guess you could have beer without archaeology, but archaeology without beer is ....well, it is hard to imagine.
      >
      > Anyway, earlier today, on Twitter, I came across a story about the 2010 World Cup of Beer. I couldn't resist reading the stories related to that. The 2010 World Cup was just held in Colorado and there were more than 3,000 beers submitted for consideration in dozens of categories. Perusing through the list of the medal-winning beers, it occurred to me that non-archaeologists might even be able to use beer examples in their classes. It could be a good conversation starter. Maybe.
      >
      > Here are a few suggestions:
      >
      > For those teaching about marriage patterns, or maybe issues related to gender, one award winning beer comes from Utah. It is called "Polygamy Porter" and the tag line on the label reads "Why Have Just the One". The photo on the label is that of a mostly naked male surrounded by several scantily clad females.
      >
      > For those teaching about religion, you might consider bringing in a bottle of "Hop God". Or "Saint Bob's Imperial Stout". Or maybe "VuDu" beer. Or for discussions about the paranormal, how about "UFO Hefeweizen"?
      >
      > If you want to incorporate discussions about sexuality, consider this medallist: "Sexual Chocolate Imperial Stout".
      >
      > For Canadians there is "IP'd, eh!"
      >
      > For those interested in Pirates, there is "Cuthroat Pale Ale"
      >
      > For maybe examples of the politically incorrect, or linguistics, how about "Hell in Keller" beer.
      > At the San Francisco SACC meetings last month, I sampled a beer called 'Arrogant Bastard.' It didn't win any medals in the World Cup, but "Dirty Bastard" did.
      >
      > All the aforementioned beers are real, and they all won medals.
      >
      > Bob
      >
    • George Thomas
      I agree!  Even to think about being an archaeologist necessarily means one is a beer connoisseur. To refuse a beer, especially after a long day in the hot
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 15 10:13 AM
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        I agree!  Even to think about being an archaeologist necessarily means one is a beer connoisseur. To refuse a beer, especially after a long day in the hot sun, is grounds for having one's troweling license pulled. Sadly, as you state, one of my favorites, my namesake "Arrogant Bastard" (good for starting conversations about politics, social control and certain economic traditions) did not win any medals at the World Cup of Beer.  (I must check to see if medalist "Dirty Bastard" is a variety produced by the "Bastard" microbrewery).  Yet you then state that "all the aforementioned beers are real, and they all won medals."  Can you cable, telegraph or tweet the World Cup poobahs and bribe them to change the results?  Arrogant B surely deserves such a boost to its resume, and thanks to your post, now their virtue and quality are in print!
        G.T.
         
        Beer
            Posted by: "Bob Muckle" bmuckle@... canadianarchaeologist
            Date: Wed Apr 14, 2010 1:56 pm ((PDT))

        Some of you who have me as a 'friend' or whatever on Facebook are likely aware that I have been giving some comments on some beers recently, particularly those with an 'archaeology' theme.  As many people are aware, beer and archaeology are almost synonymous. I guess you could have beer without archaeology, but archaeology without beer is ....well, it is hard to imagine.

        Anyway, earlier today, on Twitter, I came across a story about the 2010 World Cup of Beer. I couldn't resist reading the stories related to that. The 2010 World Cup was just held in Colorado and there were more than 3,000 beers submitted for consideration in dozens of categories. Perusing through the list of the medal-winning beers, it occurred to me that non-archaeologists might even be able to use beer examples in their classes. It could be a good conversation starter. Maybe.

        Here are a few suggestions:

        For those teaching about marriage patterns, or maybe issues related to gender, one award winning beer comes from Utah. It is called "Polygamy Porter" and the tag line on the label reads "Why Have Just the One". The photo on the label is that of a mostly naked male surrounded by several scantily clad females.

        For those teaching about religion, you might consider bringing in a bottle of "Hop God".  Or "Saint Bob's Imperial Stout". Or maybe "VuDu" beer. Or for discussions about the paranormal, how about "UFO Hefeweizen"? 

        If you want to incorporate discussions about sexuality, consider this medallist: "Sexual Chocolate Imperial Stout".

        For Canadians there is "IP'd, eh!"

        For those interested in Pirates, there is "Cuthroat Pale Ale"

        For maybe examples of the politically incorrect, or linguistics, how about "Hell in Keller" beer.
        At the San Francisco SACC meetings last month, I sampled a beer called 'Arrogant Bastard.' It didn't win any medals in the World Cup, but "Dirty Bastard" did.

        All the aforementioned beers are real, and they all won medals.

        Bob






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      • Gilliland, Mary
        Is any of this Bastard Beer related to Fat Bastard wine? I found it at Trader Joe s some years ago and make a point to include it in Christmas baskets for
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 15 11:58 AM
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          Is any of this "Bastard" Beer related to Fat Bastard wine? I found it at Trader Joe's some years ago and make a point to include it in Christmas baskets for friends. It always gets a chuckle, but is often really quite good (depends on year, grapes, etc. of course, but pretty reliable).

          Mary Kay Gilliland


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