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RE: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

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  • Deborah Shepherd
    That *is* cool. Deb ________________________________________ From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lauratgonzalez
    Message 1 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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      That *is* cool.

      Deb
      ________________________________________
      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lauratgonzalez [ltgonzalez@...]
      Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:07 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

      http://www.ustream.tv/theowlbox

      Okay, so this is only vaguely anthropological... people's fascination with nature? Anyway, it is really cool! Check out Molly the owl and her just hatched chicks. At night, owl-spouse McGee hunts voles and throws them in for the kiddies.

      Laura
    • Nina Brown
      Hello, I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC. There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is anyone
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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        Hello,

        I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
        There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
        anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
        TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)

        Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
        not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
        anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
        like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.

        I appreciate any information or tips,

        Nina
      • Bob Muckle
        Nina, We had some success with a student anthropology club at my college, starting about three years ago. We teach about eight or nine sections of Anthropology
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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          Nina,

          We had some success with a student anthropology club at my college, starting about three years ago.

          We teach about eight or nine sections of Anthropology per term. (Almost all the students intend on transferring to one of the big local universities). From that group, a core group of about 10 attended all meetings and there was usually about 15 in attendance at the weekly meetings.

          I was kind of like a faculty adivisor and attended all the meetings the first term but only occasionally after that (we wanted it to be a student-centered club).

          The first term, to start things off the three regular faculty gave some presentations on topics of their own interest, and also on some topics the students asked for, such as how exactly does the transition from college to university work, especially in regards to anthropology.

          After that, the students took it and really made it their own. During the regularly scheduled lunchtime meetings they would often show anthropology-related films or just have open discussions. They also organized their own field trips, local (ie. to the local big university museum) and international (to Seattle to visit the Lucy exhibit). They also organized parties.

          My observation was that for two years this was an extremely successful endeavor. My colleagues and I had been talking about initiating it for a few years and when we saw that we had a great core group in our classes that seemed really keen, we thought the timing was right. Mostly, we wanted to allow the students the opportunity to experience more than classroom teaching, and we wanted them to broaden there friendships within the community of student anthropologists.

          All this worked....except that as the core group of student leadership left, so did the dynamic aspect of the club. It still exists, but without any students willing to take on leadership....it has rather fizzled, and meetings are irregular.

          When I see another great core group appearing in our classes, I will re-invigorate it. Personally, I think the idea of an anthropology club at a 2 yr insititution is a great idea, but if faculty are going to take on the leadership of it, it will take considerable time and effort. If you can find some students who want to take on leadership of it, it can really be a benefit to all.

          Also, at my institution, it was important that the anthropology club be formally recognized as an official student club. Once they became official, they were able to access money from the student union, which they used for their field trips.

          Bob


          >>> "Nina Brown" <nina@...> 04/02/10 7:09 AM >>>
          Hello,

          I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
          There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
          anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
          TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)

          Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
          not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
          anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
          like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.

          I appreciate any information or tips,

          Nina
        • Andrew J Petto
          Well, if you want something more anthropological ... try the Callicam: http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/callicam/calliframes.html Be patient; it may take a while to
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
          • 0 Attachment
            Well, if you want something more anthropological ... try the Callicam: http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/callicam/calliframes.html

            Be patient; it may take a while to open.

            This is a family formation study at the Primate Center in Madison.

            We put this project together on a very small grant, using an old Apple computer and about $350 of hardware (and one really motivated HS student). Now, of course, it is a big thing, but the goal here is to help people learn to observe, record, and analyze monkey behavior by following actual animals. So, you can log in and get control of the camera for 3 minutes at a time.

            Some interesting things: Females have feeding dominance (and probably dominance WRT to resting places, etc). Males do at least some of the child-care activities (especially carrying, but these are often off-loaded to older litters who care for their younger sibs). Some great stuff here on family dynamics.

            Anj


            ------------
            Andrew J Petto, PhD
            Senior Lecturer
            Department of Biological Sciences
            University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
            PO Box 413
            Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
            CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
            Telephone: 414-229-6784
            FAX: 414-229-3926
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

            *************
            Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
            *************

            "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

            -- Pat Conroy
            The Prince of Tides

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, April 2, 2010 8:33:50 AM GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central
            Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

            That *is* cool.

            Deb
            ________________________________________
            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lauratgonzalez [ltgonzalez@...]
            Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:07 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

            http://www.ustream.tv/theowlbox

            Okay, so this is only vaguely anthropological... people's fascination with nature? Anyway, it is really cool! Check out Molly the owl and her just hatched chicks. At night, owl-spouse McGee hunts voles and throws them in for the kiddies.

            Laura





            ------------------------------------

            Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo! Groups Links
          • Rob Edwards
            Cabrillo has had such clubs off and on over the years. Core students here are usually from the archaeology field classes. I guess they needs some bonding.
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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              Cabrillo has had such clubs off and on over the years. Core students here are usually from the archaeology field classes. I guess they needs some bonding. There are at least two kinds of clubs. Those that tie into the student government (formal) or more haphazardous (casual). Both can be fun if you have the time to nurture, otherwise they desolve. Infrequently do they last more than one year without a recruitment effort in intro classes every semester. One advantage of a formal club is that student goverentment usually has some money. At Cabrillo they funded students going to conference several times and occasional scholarships for events including cost of Field classes. Formal clubs also good for vivibilty on campus for other students and especially for administration. They can assist in bringing speakers as well. It is worth the trouble. Cheers
              On Fri, 2 Apr 2010 10:09:17 -0400
              "Nina Brown" <nina@...> wrote:
              > Hello,
              >
              > I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
              > There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
              > anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
              > TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)
              >
              > Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
              > not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
              > anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
              > like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.
              >
              > I appreciate any information or tips,
              >
              > Nina
              >
            • Philip Stein
              We ve had an anthropology club off and on for many years. When you have a few students who provide strong leadership it can be a very strong club. But turn
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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                We've had an anthropology club off and on for many years. When you have a few students who provide strong leadership it can be a very strong club. But turn over of students can be rapid in the community college, so the level of activity varies from year to year. But it's nice to provide the opportunity for the students and it's great having representation in student government. We've now have been receiving about $1000 a year for many years for speakers from student government and have found that graduate students from the local universities not only give great talks, but they're trilled to do it for for a very small fee.
                 
                Phil

                --- On Fri, 4/2/10, Nina Brown <nina@...> wrote:


                From: Nina Brown <nina@...>
                Subject: [SACC-L] Student Anthropology Club?
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, April 2, 2010, 7:09 AM


                 



                Hello,

                I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
                There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
                anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
                TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology? )

                Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
                not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
                anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
                like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.

                I appreciate any information or tips,

                Nina








                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kent Morris
                Long Beach City College in Southern California, where I ve taught for over thirteen years, has had an anthro club with a professor advisor that meets on a
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
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                  Long Beach City College in Southern California, where I've taught for over
                  thirteen years, has had an anthro club with a professor advisor that meets
                  on a weekly basis for as long as I can remember, and for the last few years
                  we've also had a paganism club, advised by the same anthro professor, as
                  well as an archaeology club, advised by the prof who teaches most of the
                  archaeology classes, but I've never personally advised or otherwise been a
                  part of any of the clubs, so am not familiar with their goals and events or
                  the degree of student participation, although I always advertise the clubs
                  and encourage my students to check them out...
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Nina Brown" <nina@...>
                  To: <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Friday, April 02, 2010 7:09 AM
                  Subject: [SACC-L] Student Anthropology Club?


                  > Hello,
                  >
                  > I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
                  > There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
                  > anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows
                  > on
                  > TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)
                  >
                  > Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
                  > not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
                  > anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
                  > like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.
                  >
                  > I appreciate any information or tips,
                  >
                  > Nina
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > ------------------------------------
                  >
                  > Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
                  > Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus
                  > signature database 4990 (20100401) __________
                  >
                  > The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.
                  >
                  > http://www.eset.com
                  >
                  >
                  >


                  __________ Information from ESET NOD32 Antivirus, version of virus signature database 4990 (20100401) __________

                  The message was checked by ESET NOD32 Antivirus.

                  http://www.eset.com
                • Monica Bellas
                  Pretty cool! Monica Bellas Cerritos College Norwalk, CA To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com From: ajpetto@uwm.edu Date: Fri, 2 Apr 2010 10:10:52 -0500 Subject: Re:
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 2, 2010
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Pretty cool!

                    Monica Bellas

                    Cerritos College

                    Norwalk, CA




                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    From: ajpetto@...
                    Date: Fri, 2 Apr 2010 10:10:52 -0500
                    Subject: Re: [SACC-L] NOT ... Owl Box streaming live






                    Well, if you want something more anthropological ... try the Callicam: http://pin.primate.wisc.edu/callicam/calliframes.html

                    Be patient; it may take a while to open.

                    This is a family formation study at the Primate Center in Madison.

                    We put this project together on a very small grant, using an old Apple computer and about $350 of hardware (and one really motivated HS student). Now, of course, it is a big thing, but the goal here is to help people learn to observe, record, and analyze monkey behavior by following actual animals. So, you can log in and get control of the camera for 3 minutes at a time.

                    Some interesting things: Females have feeding dominance (and probably dominance WRT to resting places, etc). Males do at least some of the child-care activities (especially carrying, but these are often off-loaded to older litters who care for their younger sibs). Some great stuff here on family dynamics.

                    Anj

                    ------------
                    Andrew J Petto, PhD
                    Senior Lecturer
                    Department of Biological Sciences
                    University of Wisconsin -- Milwaukee
                    PO Box 413
                    Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
                    CapTel Line: 1-877-243-2823
                    Telephone: 414-229-6784
                    FAX: 414-229-3926
                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm

                    *************
                    Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
                    https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
                    *************

                    "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

                    -- Pat Conroy
                    The Prince of Tides

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "Deborah Shepherd" <deborah.shepherd@...>
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Friday, April 2, 2010 8:33:50 AM GMT -06:00 US/Canada Central
                    Subject: RE: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

                    That *is* cool.

                    Deb
                    ________________________________________
                    From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of lauratgonzalez [ltgonzalez@...]
                    Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2010 11:07 PM
                    To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: [SACC-L] Owl Box streaming live

                    http://www.ustream.tv/theowlbox

                    Okay, so this is only vaguely anthropological... people's fascination with nature? Anyway, it is really cool! Check out Molly the owl and her just hatched chicks. At night, owl-spouse McGee hunts voles and throws them in for the kiddies.

                    Laura

                    ------------------------------------

                    Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo! Groups Links






                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Kip Waldo
                    I ll just piggy-back on Bob s comments. The nature of a club all depends on the core student or students. We have an anthro club now, the first ever to my
                    Message 9 of 12 , Apr 3, 2010
                    • 0 Attachment
                      I'll just piggy-back on Bob's comments. The nature of a club all depends on the core student or students. We have an anthro club now, the first ever to my knowledge, started by a student who was lit up when she found anthropology. But, like most students, she'll be gone next year. She has done a LOT, brought speakers, organized field trip, discussions etc. But next year? Without anyone to pick up the slack, that may be "it". I am not the adviser, on paper, but I work with her on everything, from getting rooms to running fliers, to getting speakers. At our school, students need some assistance or they run into wall after wall.

                      I advise "the students for social justice" (SSJ) and that group goes through its cycles as well, each year the focus is determined by the interests of the students involved. This year they, and many other clubs who are connected to SSJ, have been active around the enormous cuts to education. The reason I mention this, is two-fold, at Chabot, it takes a faculty member to maintain continuity, as in a two-year institution, as soon as they get it together, they leave. And when other clubs put on an event, all the SSJ students who have been involved with them, help publicize it and vice versa. We also go to events together (I often arrange to get discounted tickets). This makes for much more successful events and a sense of real collectivity.

                      Good luck...

                      kip
                      >>> "Bob Muckle" <bmuckle@...> 04/02/10 8:01 AM >>>
                      Nina,

                      We had some success with a student anthropology club at my college, starting about three years ago.

                      We teach about eight or nine sections of Anthropology per term. (Almost all the students intend on transferring to one of the big local universities). From that group, a core group of about 10 attended all meetings and there was usually about 15 in attendance at the weekly meetings.

                      I was kind of like a faculty adivisor and attended all the meetings the first term but only occasionally after that (we wanted it to be a student-centered club).

                      The first term, to start things off the three regular faculty gave some presentations on topics of their own interest, and also on some topics the students asked for, such as how exactly does the transition from college to university work, especially in regards to anthropology.

                      After that, the students took it and really made it their own. During the regularly scheduled lunchtime meetings they would often show anthropology-related films or just have open discussions. They also organized their own field trips, local (ie. to the local big university museum) and international (to Seattle to visit the Lucy exhibit). They also organized parties.

                      My observation was that for two years this was an extremely successful endeavor. My colleagues and I had been talking about initiating it for a few years and when we saw that we had a great core group in our classes that seemed really keen, we thought the timing was right. Mostly, we wanted to allow the students the opportunity to experience more than classroom teaching, and we wanted them to broaden there friendships within the community of student anthropologists.

                      All this worked....except that as the core group of student leadership left, so did the dynamic aspect of the club. It still exists, but without any students willing to take on leadership....it has rather fizzled, and meetings are irregular.

                      When I see another great core group appearing in our classes, I will re-invigorate it. Personally, I think the idea of an anthropology club at a 2 yr insititution is a great idea, but if faculty are going to take on the leadership of it, it will take considerable time and effort. If you can find some students who want to take on leadership of it, it can really be a benefit to all.

                      Also, at my institution, it was important that the anthropology club be formally recognized as an official student club. Once they became official, they were able to access money from the student union, which they used for their field trips.

                      Bob


                      >>> "Nina Brown" <nina@...> 04/02/10 7:09 AM >>>
                      Hello,

                      I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
                      There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
                      anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
                      TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)

                      Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
                      not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
                      anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
                      like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.

                      I appreciate any information or tips,

                      Nina
                    • Mark Lewine
                      My experience has been similar, but I have a long-view of student clubs. The common element involved with community college student clubs is that the faculty
                      Message 10 of 12 , Apr 4, 2010
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                        My experience has been similar, but I have a long-view of student clubs. The common element involved with community college student clubs is that the faculty advisor is the key role, requiring time, energy and campus/offcampus involvement. With our two-year programs, we at most get a student leader for 2-3 years. Then we must recruit all over again. It was worth doing when I was building an anthro program and needed anthro to have a public face on campus and in the community. Anthro has negatives in mainstream consumer culture as it is still viewed as esoteric, "hard", anti-religious, mostly for whites/upper class/intellectual-wierd people who watch science on cable. When I was building an anthropology program an active student club was important with 'faces' that attracted others. I spent a lot of time and energy recruiting club leaders and helped them develop 'active' club meetings, on and off-campus activities, raffles, cultural talent demonstrations, book and artifact contests. It was very rewarding in that I developed relationships with interesting students who later became tutor/interns/research project participants. However, I did this mostly when the workload was 3 classes a term (quarters) and it became harder when it grew to 4 now 5 classes a term. When our program reached the tipping point for cost-benefit analysis (we grew to 12 sections of 3 subfields and 5 course load for me with a lot of office work for being program chair) I no longer could justify spending the time, told the students I would help the club with paperwork support only, and it died almost immediately.
                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: Kip Waldo
                        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                        Sent: Saturday, April 03, 2010 11:30 PM
                        Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Student Anthropology Club?



                        I'll just piggy-back on Bob's comments. The nature of a club all depends on the core student or students. We have an anthro club now, the first ever to my knowledge, started by a student who was lit up when she found anthropology. But, like most students, she'll be gone next year. She has done a LOT, brought speakers, organized field trip, discussions etc. But next year? Without anyone to pick up the slack, that may be "it". I am not the adviser, on paper, but I work with her on everything, from getting rooms to running fliers, to getting speakers. At our school, students need some assistance or they run into wall after wall.

                        I advise "the students for social justice" (SSJ) and that group goes through its cycles as well, each year the focus is determined by the interests of the students involved. This year they, and many other clubs who are connected to SSJ, have been active around the enormous cuts to education. The reason I mention this, is two-fold, at Chabot, it takes a faculty member to maintain continuity, as in a two-year institution, as soon as they get it together, they leave. And when other clubs put on an event, all the SSJ students who have been involved with them, help publicize it and vice versa. We also go to events together (I often arrange to get discounted tickets). This makes for much more successful events and a sense of real collectivity.

                        Good luck...

                        kip
                        >>> "Bob Muckle" <bmuckle@...> 04/02/10 8:01 AM >>>
                        Nina,

                        We had some success with a student anthropology club at my college, starting about three years ago.

                        We teach about eight or nine sections of Anthropology per term. (Almost all the students intend on transferring to one of the big local universities). From that group, a core group of about 10 attended all meetings and there was usually about 15 in attendance at the weekly meetings.

                        I was kind of like a faculty adivisor and attended all the meetings the first term but only occasionally after that (we wanted it to be a student-centered club).

                        The first term, to start things off the three regular faculty gave some presentations on topics of their own interest, and also on some topics the students asked for, such as how exactly does the transition from college to university work, especially in regards to anthropology.

                        After that, the students took it and really made it their own. During the regularly scheduled lunchtime meetings they would often show anthropology-related films or just have open discussions. They also organized their own field trips, local (ie. to the local big university museum) and international (to Seattle to visit the Lucy exhibit). They also organized parties.

                        My observation was that for two years this was an extremely successful endeavor. My colleagues and I had been talking about initiating it for a few years and when we saw that we had a great core group in our classes that seemed really keen, we thought the timing was right. Mostly, we wanted to allow the students the opportunity to experience more than classroom teaching, and we wanted them to broaden there friendships within the community of student anthropologists.

                        All this worked....except that as the core group of student leadership left, so did the dynamic aspect of the club. It still exists, but without any students willing to take on leadership....it has rather fizzled, and meetings are irregular.

                        When I see another great core group appearing in our classes, I will re-invigorate it. Personally, I think the idea of an anthropology club at a 2 yr insititution is a great idea, but if faculty are going to take on the leadership of it, it will take considerable time and effort. If you can find some students who want to take on leadership of it, it can really be a benefit to all.

                        Also, at my institution, it was important that the anthropology club be formally recognized as an official student club. Once they became official, they were able to access money from the student union, which they used for their field trips.

                        Bob

                        >>> "Nina Brown" <nina@...> 04/02/10 7:09 AM >>>
                        Hello,

                        I am thinking about starting a club for anthropology students at my CC.
                        There seem to be a lot of people interested in anthropology lately (Is
                        anyone else noticing that by the way? Maybe it's because of all the shows on
                        TV showing forensic anthropology and glamorous archaeology?)

                        Anyway, I know many 4 year colleges have anthropology clubs, but it seems
                        not too common for CCs. I wondered if anyone has experience running an
                        anthropology club? I don't think we would sit around and discuss research
                        like the clubs at the 4 years seem to do, but maybe some field trips, etc.

                        I appreciate any information or tips,

                        Nina





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