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archaeology videos

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  • Bob Muckle
    In response to George Thomas s query about videos for an Intro to Archaeology course, I like to show the following: To accompany lectures and readings on
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 2, 2009
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      In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to Archaeology course, I like to show the following:

      To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality, mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)

      For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the Andes.

      For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8: Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the Maya at Copan (ecological); the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo sites in the Southwest (environmental), and a site in Iraq (salination).

      Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the work of so many different areas....palynologists, fibre specialists, hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists, etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he came from, and how he died are always changing

      Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line, for free, but I don't the web site.

      Bob
    • Deborah Shepherd
      I like the NOVA online video pages because I try to allow my online students to see the same material that I show in seated class (I do however ask the school
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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        I like the NOVA online video pages because I try to allow my online students to see the same material that I show in seated class (I do however ask the school to purchase my favorites as DVDs for classroom viewing). You can see what is available for complete-episode viewing here: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/programs/int_anth.html
        Also, check the history and other categories for more relevant episodes. The newer shows will also have other links, including interactives, from their homepages. Here's an example about bog bodies: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/bog/

        If a program isn't available as a video, you can still probably access the transcript. I found the Otzi transcript here: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/transcripts/2518iceman.html
        And there is a companion website link on that page, too.

        NOVA is a great resource. American Experience has some valuable material, too. Here's a native American page from that site with some video clip links: http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/weshallremain/beyond_broadcast/activities_5

        Another resource for online students are the preview clips for many of the films at http://www.der.org/
        Free study guides are also available online.

        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Bob Muckle
        Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 11:49 PM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [SACC-L] archaeology videos



        In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to Archaeology course, I like to show the following:

        To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality, mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)

        For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the Andes.

        For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8: Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the Maya at Copan (ecological); the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo sites in the Southwest (environmental), and a site in Iraq (salination).

        Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the work of so many different areas....palynologists, fibre specialists, hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists, etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he came from, and how he died are always changing

        Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line, for free, but I don't the web site.

        Bob



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • mep1mep
        I just got a note from a friend about a new archaeology, PBS series called Time Team.  I put all the info up on my blog because its easy to post links
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 3, 2009
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          I just got a note from a friend about a new archaeology, PBS series called Time Team.  I put all the info up on my blog because its easy to post links there.  Funny, that we were all just sharing on the topic.  It looks like a great support site.

          Pam
          http://teachinganthropology.blogspot.com

           



          ________________________________
          From: Deborah Shepherd <deborah.shepherd@...>
          To: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com" <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, August 3, 2009 3:38:58 PM
          Subject: RE: [SACC-L] archaeology videos

           
          I like the NOVA online video pages because I try to allow my online students to see the same material that I show in seated class (I do however ask the school to purchase my favorites as DVDs for classroom viewing). You can see what is available for complete-episode viewing here: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/programs/ int_anth. html
          Also, check the history and other categories for more relevant episodes. The newer shows will also have other links, including interactives, from their homepages. Here's an example about bog bodies: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/bog/

          If a program isn't available as a video, you can still probably access the transcript. I found the Otzi transcript here: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/transcripts /2518iceman. html
          And there is a companion website link on that page, too.

          NOVA is a great resource. American Experience has some valuable material, too. Here's a native American page from that site with some video clip links: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ amex/weshallrema in/beyond_ broadcast/ activities_ 5

          Another resource for online students are the preview clips for many of the films at http://www.der org/
          Free study guides are also available online.

          From: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bob Muckle
          Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 11:49 PM
          To: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com
          Subject: [SACC-L] archaeology videos

          In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to Archaeology course, I like to show the following:

          To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality, mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)

          For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the Andes.

          For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8: Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the Maya at Copan (ecological) ; the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo sites in the Southwest (environmental) , and a site in Iraq (salination) .

          Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the work of so many different areas....palynologi sts, fibre specialists, hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists, etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he came from, and how he died are always changing

          Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line, for free, but I don't the web site.

          Bob

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mep1mep
          Resending.  I apologize if its a duplicate but it doesn t look like this email got sent.  It is useful info. I just got a note from a friend about a new
          Message 4 of 7 , Aug 4, 2009
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            Resending.  I apologize if its a duplicate but it doesn't look like this email got sent.  It is useful info.

            I just got a note from a friend about a new archaeology, PBS series called Time Team.  I put all the info up on my blog because its easy to post links there.  Funny, that we were all just sharing on the topic.  It looks like a great support site.

            Pam
            teachinganthropology.blogspot.com

             



            ________________________________
            From: Deborah Shepherd <deborah.shepherd@...>
            To: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com" <SACC-L@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Monday, August 3, 2009 3:38:58 PM
            Subject: RE: [SACC-L] archaeology videos

             
            I like the NOVA online video pages because I try to allow my online students to see the same material that I show in seated class (I do however ask the school to purchase my favorites as DVDs for classroom viewing). You can see what is available for complete-episode viewing here: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/programs/ int_anth. html
            Also, check the history and other categories for more relevant episodes. The newer shows will also have other links, including interactives, from their homepages. Here's an example about bog bodies: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/bog/

            If a program isn't available as a video, you can still probably access the transcript. I found the Otzi transcript here: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ nova/transcripts /2518iceman. html
            And there is a companion website link on that page, too.

            NOVA is a great resource. American Experience has some valuable material, too. Here's a native American page from that site with some video clip links: http://www.pbs org/wgbh/ amex/weshallrema in/beyond_ broadcast/ activities_ 5

            Another resource for online students are the preview clips for many of the films at http://www.der org/
            Free study guides are also available online.

            From: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Bob Muckle
            Sent: Sunday, August 02, 2009 11:49 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com
            Subject: [SACC-L] archaeology videos

            In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to Archaeology course, I like to show the following:

            To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality, mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)

            For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the Andes.

            For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8: Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the Maya at Copan (ecological) ; the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo sites in the Southwest (environmental) , and a site in Iraq (salination) .

            Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the work of so many different areas....palynologi sts, fibre specialists, hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists, etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he came from, and how he died are always changing

            Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line, for free, but I don't the web site.

            Bob

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ann Bragdon
            What is the website for the Out of the Past films. Thanks for all the great resources. Ann Bragdon ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            Message 5 of 7 , Aug 10, 2009
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              What is the website for the "Out of the Past" films.
              Thanks for all the great resources.
              Ann Bragdon

              On Aug 2, 2009, at 11:48 PM, Bob Muckle wrote:

              > In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to
              > Archaeology course, I like to show the following:
              >
              > To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and
              > political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and
              > Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and
              > determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of
              > 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a
              > woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality,
              > mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)
              >
              > For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on
              > the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the
              > Andes.
              >
              > For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8:
              > Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the
              > Maya at Copan (ecological); the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo
              > sites in the Southwest (environmental), and a site in Iraq
              > (salination).
              >
              > Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it
              > to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the
              > work of so many different areas....palynologists, fibre specialists,
              > hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists,
              > etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he
              > came from, and how he died are always changing
              >
              > Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may
              > be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the
              > "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line,
              > for free, but I don't the web site.
              >
              > Bob
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Ann Bragdon
              Found it... Out of the past… streams. http://www.learner.org/resources/series45.html 1. New Worlds The Age of Discovery 500 years ago revealed a broad range
              Message 6 of 7 , Aug 10, 2009
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                Found it...

                Out of the past� streams.
                http://www.learner.org/resources/series45.html
                1. New Worlds
                The Age of Discovery 500 years ago revealed a broad range of cultures,
                from the vast empires of the Aztecs and the Incas to roving bands of
                hunter-gatherers. This provided irrefutable evidence that cultures,
                like biological species, have evolved independently and on a global
                scale.

                2. The Hearth
                Examines how enculturation and economic cooperation have shaped the
                homes and families of people, past and present. Remains of houses at
                archaeological sites and footage of family life in traditional cultures
                provide a glimpse into what family life must have been like.

                3. Artisans and Traders
                Explores the link between economic and cultural evolution.
                Hunter-gatherers and early agriculturalists had simple divisions of
                labor, but today people make a living in many ways. The proliferation
                of occupations and the extreme economic interdependence of today are
                the result of increasing job specialization, causing society to
                continually undergo restructuring.

                4. Signs and Symbols
                Unearthing and interpreting the signs and symbols that define us as a
                species can be challenging yet revealing. From deciphering ancient
                scripts to understanding status symbols, archaeologists use ancient and
                modern examples to reconstruct the meaning of the symbols they find.

                5. Power, Prestige, and Wealth
                Postulates how and why powerful groups or individuals have managed to
                control vast holdings from ancient times to the present day. The
                different methods archaeologists use to study how rulers gain and keep
                power are examined.

                6. Realms
                Reconstructing actual borders of ancient kingdoms is often impossible,
                but archaeologists can reveal much of the internal workings of
                societies and their external relations by looking at marriage
                alliances, trade, and warfare.

                7. The Spirit World
                Archaeologists look at ritual behavior and sacred spaces and objects
                in archaeological and ethnographic settings to attribute religious
                meanings. Examples from present-day, traditional societies show the
                complexity of spiritual life and the limits and possibilities of
                archaeological reconstruction.

                8. Collapse
                The decline and fall of civilizations captures our interest. Could we
                be next, going the way of the Sumerians, the Romans, the Maya? The
                collapse of Copan, brought on by overpopulation and overexploitation of
                resources, is explored along with other ancient cultures that have
                faced the problems we confront today.



                On Aug 10, 2009, at 3:15 PM, Ann Bragdon wrote:

                > What is the website for the "Out of the Past" films.
                > Thanks for all the great resources.
                > Ann Bragdon
                >
                > On Aug 2, 2009, at 11:48 PM, Bob Muckle wrote:
                >
                > > In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to
                > > Archaeology course, I like to show the following:
                > >
                > > To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and
                > > political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige
                > and
                > > Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and
                > > determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level
                > of
                > > 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a
                > > woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality,
                > > mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)
                > >
                > > For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on
                > > the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the
                > > Andes.
                > >
                > > For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8:
                > > Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the
                > > Maya at Copan (ecological); the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo
                > > sites in the Southwest (environmental), and a site in Iraq
                > > (salination).
                > >
                > > Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it
                > > to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the
                > > work of so many different areas....palynologists, fibre specialists,
                > > hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists,
                > > etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where
                > he
                > > came from, and how he died are always changing
                > >
                > > Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and
                > may
                > > be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the
                > > "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line,
                > > for free, but I don't the web site.
                > >
                > > Bob
                > >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bob Muckle
                For the Out of the Past video series......www.learner.org/resources.series45.html There are a few films with the same title, including one starring Robert
                Message 7 of 7 , Aug 10, 2009
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                  For the "Out of the Past" video series......www.learner.org/resources.series45.html

                  There are a few films with the same title, including one starring Robert Mitchum. That might be good, but it isn't the one I recommend for archaeology classes.

                  Bob

                  >>> Ann Bragdon <ANNBRAG@...> 08/10/09 1:15 PM >>>
                  What is the website for the "Out of the Past" films.
                  Thanks for all the great resources.
                  Ann Bragdon

                  On Aug 2, 2009, at 11:48 PM, Bob Muckle wrote:

                  > In response to George Thomas's query about videos for an Intro to
                  > Archaeology course, I like to show the following:
                  >
                  > To accompany lectures and readings on reconstructing social and
                  > political systems, I like "Out of the Past, no. 5: Power, Prestige and
                  > Wealth" (focussing on reconstructing inequality among the Maya, and
                  > determining whether the Maya groups in Copan ever reached the level of
                  > 'state.') and "Siberian Ice Maiden" (focussing on the tomb of a
                  > woman,and showing how archaeologists reconstruct social inequality,
                  > mobility, trade, seasonality, etc)
                  >
                  > For reconstucting ideology, I like "Frozen in Heaven" (focussing on
                  > the Inca ritual of capa cocha/child sacrifice on mountaintops in the
                  > Andes.
                  >
                  > For explaining culture change, I like "Out of the Past, no. 8:
                  > Collapse" focussing on potential explanations of the collapse of the
                  > Maya at Copan (ecological); the abandonment of Anasazi/Old Pueblo
                  > sites in the Southwest (environmental), and a site in Iraq
                  > (salination).
                  >
                  > Sometimes I use a Nova video on Otzi, the Iceman. I like to show it
                  > to show the multidisplinary aspect of archaeology (eg. combining the
                  > work of so many different areas....palynologists, fibre specialists,
                  > hair specialists, dating, lithic specialists, parasitologists,
                  > etc.....AND to show how are interpretations of who Otzi was, where he
                  > came from, and how he died are always changing
                  >
                  > Siberian Ice Maiden and Frozen in Heaven are Nova productions and may
                  > be available on-line (I still use the dvd versions). I believe the
                  > "Out of the Past series" (eight in total) is also available on line,
                  > for free, but I don't the web site.
                  >
                  > Bob
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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