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  • lauratgonzalez
    Pat Hamlen shares her NEH Summer Research Program experience on the blog: www.ccanthro.blogspot.com You can comment on any blog posting by clicking on the
    Message 1 of 13 , Jul 29, 2009
      Pat Hamlen shares her NEH Summer Research Program experience on the blog: www.ccanthro.blogspot.com

      You can comment on any blog posting by clicking on the small "Comments" link at the bottom of a post.

      Laura
    • lauratgonzalez
      Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for Dennis Kellogg s latest entry entitled I SAID…THEY HEARD; Medical-Speak: Dialect or
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 6, 2009
        Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for Dennis Kellogg's latest entry entitled "I SAID…THEY HEARD; Medical-Speak: Dialect or Different Language?" In this post, Dennis rants about his "cardio-event" last November, focusing on the communication gaps that separate medical staff from patient.
      • Chuck & Gail Ellenbaum
        I SAID...THEY HEARD is great. It s like the Brits and the Yanks—two peoples separated by a common language. I ve been a volunteer clinical chaplain and
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 6, 2009
          I SAID...THEY HEARD is great. It's like the Brits and the Yanks�two
          peoples separated by a common language. I've been a volunteer
          clinical chaplain and hospice chaplain over the last thirty some odd
          years and spend time each week in hospitals seeing people. It is
          amazing to contrast the medical language with ordinary speech. I
          wonder how many medical errors arise from this difference in words and
          meaning. When I have been a patient, I have been less than pleased to
          be awakened early in the morning to be asked how I am sleeping.
          Sarcasm never seemed to work. Does any one else have stories of
          medical adventure to tell?

          Chuck Ellenbaum ><>

          On Sep 6, 2009, at 9:22 AM, lauratgonzalez wrote:

          > Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for
          > Dennis Kellogg's latest entry entitled "I SAID�THEY HEARD; Medical-
          > Speak: Dialect or Different Language?" In this post, Dennis rants
          > about his "cardio-event" last November, focusing on the
          > communication gaps that separate medical staff from patient.
          >
          >
          >
          >

          Charles Ellenbaum
          707 Shady Avenue
          Geneva, IL 60134
          Cell: 630-404-1261 <ellenbaumbridge@...>
          "When beholding the beauty of the ocean skin, one forgets the tiger
          heart that pants beneath it." Herman Melville







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Andrew Petto
          Yeah, but I wonder to what extent this is intrinsic within any field or discipline ... especially at the lower levels. A lot of his spleen got vented on the PA
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 7, 2009
            Yeah, but I wonder to what extent this is intrinsic within any field or
            discipline ... especially at the lower levels. A lot of his spleen got
            vented on the PA (physician's assistant). These folks are pretty low in
            the hierarchy and use the language both to set themselves off from the
            general public (as Kellogg complained) AND to be admitted to the
            fellowship of the profession which uses this language as a formal means
            of communication (and we hope as an efficient means). So, the poor PA is
            caught between 2 worlds. S/he may not even know the stuff well enough to
            gloss it in plain English; and is probably also reprimanded for not
            using medical terminology. And, s/he is probably asking the questions
            and making the entries on a format dictated by those from above; there
            is very little professional autonomy at this level.

            In the olden days, we used to require that people memorize anatomical
            memorials to "great men" who made certain discoveries. The problem is
            that these names (with a few exceptions, like crapper,
            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Crapper_Toilet_Horta_Museum_Branding.jpg)
            don't really tell us. There is now a move afoot in anatomical and
            medical sciences to name things descriptively, so "Circle of Willis"
            becomes "Cerebral Arterial Circle".

            Even so, learning and learning to use these terms are the first steps in
            the entree into the medical professions. They convey, in part, the
            status of insider. On the other hand, the MDs do not have this status
            problem, and they, of all people, ought to be comfortable in "speaking
            plain" to ordinary people.

            But, before we jump on Kellogg's high horse, how many of us insist on
            using our "professional" language, at least when we discuss things in
            our own discipline? Mostly, we would argue that it is appropriate,
            because these terms have a precision and a meaning that is necessary for
            successful discourse about the topic --- but that is only true within
            our disciplines. The way we speak --- and the term that we use that are
            so important and meaningful to us --- may mean either nothing or
            entirely something else to those outside our profession.

            Now, luckily, anthropology is rarely going to provide the life-saving
            intervention in a "cardiac event", so perhaps some of the pressure is
            off. And those who serve or care for the public do need to learn to
            communicate effectively.

            So, saying "We often regard anger as a part of depression, because it
            masks depression in cases where people have experienced life-changing
            illnesses or injuries" would definitely be better than saying "Anger is
            the same thing as depression." However, the quick-and-dirty application
            of medical history skills taught to a PA may not include this more
            detailed explanation. S/he is probably trained merely to mark
            "depression" if a patient expresses anger.

            If this is the case, then the P/A can hardly be faulted for making this
            conclusion (and for not understanding how one reaches it), because, as
            is often the case, we focus on teaching the technical skills in many of
            these programs and not on the deeper understanding that gives these
            skills a context and meaning. We need the skills, of course, but without
            the understanding we end up in a situation like Kellogg's.

            FWIW, there is a fairly old book out there written by a journalist who
            experienced a "cardiac event". The book goes through the process
            experienced by the patient and has an interesting give-and-take between
            the patient and the physician. _A Coronary Event_ by Michael Halberstam
            and Stephan Lesher. J.B. Lippincott and Co. Philadelphia (1976)

            lauratgonzalez wrote:
            >
            > Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com
            > <http://ccanthro.blogspot.com> for Dennis Kellogg's latest entry
            > entitled "I SAID…THEY HEARD; Medical-Speak: Dialect or Different
            > Language?" In this post, Dennis rants about his "cardio-event" last
            > November, focusing on the communication gaps that separate medical
            > staff from patient.
            >
            >
            >

            --
            Andrew J Petto, PhD
            Senior Lecturer
            Department of Biological Sciences
            University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
            PO Box 413
            Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
            414.229.6784
            fax: 414.229.3926
            ajpetto@...
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/index.htm
            http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/Biology/Docs/Faculty/ajpetto.html

            *************
            Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
            https://pantherfile.uwm.edu/ajpetto/www/scc2.htm
            *************


            "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None. My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

            -- Pat Conroy
            The Prince of Tides
          • Lloyd Miller
            It is with humility and contrition that I come before y all and disavow some (not all, but some) of my nasty thoughts about blogs. I read Dennis two pieces
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 13, 2009
              It is with humility and contrition that I come before y'all and
              disavow some (not all, but some) of my nasty thoughts about blogs. I
              read Dennis' two pieces and Maren's, Pat's and Bob's as well and found
              them all to be interesting, well written and relevant to who we are
              and what we do. I told Dennis that I thought he might have a second
              career in standup comedy. ( I've made this confessional a piece in our
              Nov AN column.) So, Laura, can you ever forgive me?

              I don't know anything about tweeting or twittering, except that you're
              limited to something like 140 characters and that it can be fatal if
              you do it while driving. So, Bob and Brian, can y'all forgive me too?

              There, I feel much better!

              Lloyd



              On Sep 6, 2009, at 9:22 AM, lauratgonzalez wrote:

              > Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for
              > Dennis Kellogg's latest entry entitled "I SAID�THEY HEARD; Medical-
              > Speak: Dialect or Different Language?" In this post, Dennis rants
              > about his "cardio-event" last November, focusing on the
              > communication gaps that separate medical staff from patient.
              >
              >
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Gilliland, Mary
              Lloyd: I haven t blogged yet, though I told Laura I would. I guess I m going to have to jump in and try. I find I love most of the new things once I get
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 13, 2009
                Lloyd: I haven't blogged yet, though I told Laura I would. I guess I'm going to have to jump in and try. I find I love most of the new things once I get around to them, and they turn out not to be so difficult, but for the most part, I rarely embrace them much. I'm still an e-mailer, which is pretty new in my book. My staff like to text me instead of phoning, and I have gotten used to it, but my number of texts per month is about 10! Very unlike the younger generation. But I do agree -- I have enjoyed reading what my fellow SACCers have posted, so if anyone will convert me, it will be this group!

                Mary Kay
                ________________________________________
                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Lloyd Miller [lloyd.miller@...]
                Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 3:28 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] New Blog Post

                It is with humility and contrition that I come before y'all and
                disavow some (not all, but some) of my nasty thoughts about blogs. I
                read Dennis' two pieces and Maren's, Pat's and Bob's as well and found
                them all to be interesting, well written and relevant to who we are
                and what we do. I told Dennis that I thought he might have a second
                career in standup comedy. ( I've made this confessional a piece in our
                Nov AN column.) So, Laura, can you ever forgive me?

                I don't know anything about tweeting or twittering, except that you're
                limited to something like 140 characters and that it can be fatal if
                you do it while driving. So, Bob and Brian, can y'all forgive me too?

                There, I feel much better!

                Lloyd



                On Sep 6, 2009, at 9:22 AM, lauratgonzalez wrote:

                > Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for
                > Dennis Kellogg's latest entry entitled "I SAID…THEY HEARD; Medical-
                > Speak: Dialect or Different Language?" In this post, Dennis rants
                > about his "cardio-event" last November, focusing on the
                > communication gaps that separate medical staff from patient.
                >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                ------------------------------------

                Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo! Groups Links
              • Lynch, Brian M
                Lloyd, Whatever comments you ve made in the past have been completely made up for by your contribution to important instructions about Tweeting-- which I am
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 14, 2009
                  Lloyd, Whatever comments you've made in the past have been completely
                  made up for by your contribution to important instructions about
                  Tweeting-- which I am now sure to steal when I introduce Tweets etc. to
                  anyone:

                  ...limited to 140 characters... potentially fatal if you do it while
                  driving...!

                  Thanks!

                  Brian






                  Brian Donohue-Lynch
                  Anthropology/Sociology
                  Quinebaug Valley Community College
                  Danielson, CT 06239
                  (860) 412-7255


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  Of Lloyd Miller
                  Sent: Sunday, September 13, 2009 6:28 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SACC-L] New Blog Post

                  It is with humility and contrition that I come before y'all and
                  disavow some (not all, but some) of my nasty thoughts about blogs. I
                  read Dennis' two pieces and Maren's, Pat's and Bob's as well and found
                  them all to be interesting, well written and relevant to who we are
                  and what we do. I told Dennis that I thought he might have a second
                  career in standup comedy. ( I've made this confessional a piece in our
                  Nov AN column.) So, Laura, can you ever forgive me?

                  I don't know anything about tweeting or twittering, except that you're
                  limited to something like 140 characters and that it can be fatal if
                  you do it while driving. So, Bob and Brian, can y'all forgive me too?

                  There, I feel much better!

                  Lloyd



                  On Sep 6, 2009, at 9:22 AM, lauratgonzalez wrote:

                  > Please visit the SACCommentary Blog http://ccanthro.blogspot.com for
                  > Dennis Kellogg's latest entry entitled "I SAID...THEY HEARD; Medical-
                  > Speak: Dialect or Different Language?" In this post, Dennis rants
                  > about his "cardio-event" last November, focusing on the
                  > communication gaps that separate medical staff from patient.
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                  ------------------------------------

                  Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
                  Groups Links
                • lauratgonzalez
                  http://www.ccanthro.blogspot.com/ Visit the SACCommentary blog for a new post by Maren Wilson (aka Wanna B. Anthropologist) on some interesting behavior of the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 20, 2009
                    http://www.ccanthro.blogspot.com/

                    Visit the SACCommentary blog for a new post by Maren Wilson (aka Wanna B. Anthropologist) on some interesting behavior of the Nacirema.

                    If you have anything you would like me to post to the blog, please send it to Lagonzal@.... You can also post it yourself if you get admin rights; just send me a note.

                    Laura
                  • Lynch, Brian M
                    I would like to take this opportunity with the note about the latest blog post for SACC, to highlight also two widgets that are currently on the blog. At
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 20, 2009
                      I would like to take this opportunity with the note about the latest blog post for SACC, to highlight also two "widgets" that are currently on the blog. At the time of our prior discussion about Twitter etc. I took the liberty to create one of the widgets (using Springwidgets, which is free) that served as a reader for any posts on Twitter that might be relevant for our group. As it is a demo of the concept, I wouldn't see it as comprehensive.

                      The widget is in fact based on a simple principle: when you send a Tweet, you include in it a specific "tag" (I made up one that seemed pretty safe not to be someone else's-- #SACC_L ). That tag includes a hash mark # and then the set of unique characters that I came up with to identify specific tweets. The widget then goes to Twitter and reads all Tweets that have #SACC_L in them, and displays these in an ongoing active window. As new relevant tweets are added, along with this tag, they continue to be added and scrolled in the widget window.

                      That widget is really just a string of code that itself can be cut and pasted into any webpage, and then you have a portable widget for wherever you want that info displayed. This semester I pasted this same code for example into my online(Blackboard) course shell, and now my students can see these active anthropology-related tweets while in their online environment of Blackboard.
                      You can get the code by clicking on the link that shows at the bottom of the widget (that says "Get this Widget"!)

                      Meanwhile, I have also created a widget using the same code, that reads the otherwise publicly available archives of our SACC_L listserv messages from Yahoo, and displays these as well in the widget window. So if you go to the SACC blog you see the two different widgets, one reading the SACC_L tweets, and one reading the SACC-L listserv.

                      Hope this is clear. Once you get the idea of how these things work, the possibilities are exciting.

                      If you are in the mood/mode to Twitter, and have things to share that you think fit our discussions in SACC, be sure to include the #SACC_L "hash tag" and your Tweets will join the mix. Meanwhile, if you are on a search for regular, diverse, and interesting Tweets about most if not all of the five fields of anthro, go to Twitter, and do a search on "@bobmuckle" Watch what you come up with!

                      Brian


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • lauratgonzalez
                      I d like to thank Brian who has kindly agreed to be SACC s Twitter guide. Although he s way ahead of me on, well, pretty much everything, he s creating a
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 21, 2009
                        I'd like to thank Brian who has kindly agreed to be SACC's Twitter guide. Although he's way ahead of me on, well, pretty much everything, he's creating a Twitter "twibe" for us. This is separate fromt eh widget that he's created and posted on the blog.

                        Basic instructions: To signal that your tweet would be interesting to other SACC-ers, include #SACC_L in the message of your tweet. To read SACC tweets, go to the search box and type in #SACC_L.

                        Laura



                        --- In SACC-L@yahoogroups.com, "Lynch, Brian M" <blynch@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > I would like to take this opportunity with the note about the latest blog post for SACC, to highlight also two "widgets" that are currently on the blog. At the time of our prior discussion about Twitter etc. I took the liberty to create one of the widgets (using Springwidgets, which is free) that served as a reader for any posts on Twitter that might be relevant for our group. As it is a demo of the concept, I wouldn't see it as comprehensive.
                        >
                        > The widget is in fact based on a simple principle: when you send a Tweet, you include in it a specific "tag" (I made up one that seemed pretty safe not to be someone else's-- #SACC_L ). That tag includes a hash mark # and then the set of unique characters that I came up with to identify specific tweets. The widget then goes to Twitter and reads all Tweets that have #SACC_L in them, and displays these in an ongoing active window. As new relevant tweets are added, along with this tag, they continue to be added and scrolled in the widget window.
                        >
                        > That widget is really just a string of code that itself can be cut and pasted into any webpage, and then you have a portable widget for wherever you want that info displayed. This semester I pasted this same code for example into my online(Blackboard) course shell, and now my students can see these active anthropology-related tweets while in their online environment of Blackboard.
                        > You can get the code by clicking on the link that shows at the bottom of the widget (that says "Get this Widget"!)
                        >
                        > Meanwhile, I have also created a widget using the same code, that reads the otherwise publicly available archives of our SACC_L listserv messages from Yahoo, and displays these as well in the widget window. So if you go to the SACC blog you see the two different widgets, one reading the SACC_L tweets, and one reading the SACC-L listserv.
                        >
                        > Hope this is clear. Once you get the idea of how these things work, the possibilities are exciting.
                        >
                        > If you are in the mood/mode to Twitter, and have things to share that you think fit our discussions in SACC, be sure to include the #SACC_L "hash tag" and your Tweets will join the mix. Meanwhile, if you are on a search for regular, diverse, and interesting Tweets about most if not all of the five fields of anthro, go to Twitter, and do a search on "@bobmuckle" Watch what you come up with!
                        >
                        > Brian
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • lauratgonzalez
                        Our inimitable friend and colleague, Dennis Kellogg, has written another rant, this time on the topic of Jury Duty. You can read it at
                        Message 11 of 13 , Nov 13, 2009
                          Our inimitable friend and colleague, Dennis Kellogg, has written another rant, this time on the topic of Jury Duty. You can read it at http://www.ccanthro.blogspot.com/.
                        • lauratgonzalez
                          Visit the SACCommentary blog to find out how Lloyd Miller really feels about pigs! http://www.ccanthro.blogspot.com/
                          Message 12 of 13 , Nov 30, 2009
                            Visit the SACCommentary blog to find out how Lloyd Miller really feels about pigs! http://www.ccanthro.blogspot.com/
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