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November AN column

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  • Lloyd Miller
    Greetings all, The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing s new, perhaps
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 9, 2008
      Greetings all,

      The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
      Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
      perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
      plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
      SACCers like?

      Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
      newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?

      Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?

      Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
      education committee(s) you're serving on?

      Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
      campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
      the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?

      Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
      or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.

      Best,
      Lloyd

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kaupp, Ann
      Great ideas, Lloyd. Do think we need to at least announce what we can about the meeting. Do we have the dates? Also announce the student awards. I see the AAA
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 9, 2008
        Great ideas, Lloyd. Do think we need to at least announce what we can
        about the meeting. Do we have the dates?
        Also announce the student awards. I see the AAA doesn't have ours up
        yet. It does mention the president's award but we've never put together
        criteria to formalize it. Something to think about. I'm working on a
        teacher award that thought we could offer every other year if all
        approve. Will send it out soon to get your feedback. So this year would
        be student nominations and next year teacher nominations. Ann


        ________________________________

        From: Lloyd Miller [mailto:lloyd.miller@...]
        Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 10:03 AM
        To: Maren Wilson; Mary Gilliland; Mark Lewine; Kaupp, Ann; Diane
        Wilhelm; Becky Stein-Frankle (w); Ann Popplestone; Patricia Hamlen;
        Laura Gonzalez; George Rodgers; Dianne Chidester; Deborah Shepherd; Bob
        Muckle; Melvin Johnson; Phil Stein; Chuck Ellenbaum; Jo Rainy Rodgers
        Cc: SACC
        Subject: November AN column


        Greetings all,


        The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and Mary
        Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new, perhaps
        a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers, plans, even
        tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff SACCers like?


        Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
        newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?


        Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?


        Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the education
        committee(s) you're serving on?


        Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your campus,
        things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in the field
        of anthropology, in the world, etc.?


        Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6 or
        7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.


        Best,
        Lloyd


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • rob edwards
        Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am puzzling over the timing
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 9, 2008
          Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields
          presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am
          puzzling over the timing of the Symposium on Sunday and wonder if a post
          symposium dinner is appropriate. So many people will be leaving for home
          . While the speakers are all local to the Bay area, only the Rodgers and
          I are. If this tradition is to continue, I would guess it should be a
          lunch which follows immediately. So how many of you would stay?/Cheers

          Five Fields in Anthropology, SACC Invited Panel/Symposium, American
          Anthropological Association, November, 2008, Chair, Rob Edwards,
          Cabrillo College, California

          This is an invited panel/session of the Society for Anthropology in
          Community Colleges which has become a valued tradition at the Annual
          Meetings of the American Anthropology Association. Panelists are
          recruited from the five fields of anthropology: Applied, Archaeology,
          Cultural, Linguistics and Physical. Each panelist has chosen some aspect
          of their field to synthesize or summarize so that those who are
          interested in lower division courses in those fields can be refreshed
          and updated on some aspect of the field. Each panelist has about fifteen
          minutes for their presentation. Their written papers will be published
          in a future issue of �Teaching Anthropology�, a newsletter of SACC. (/At
          least one presenter will need a LCD projector/.)

          *_Linguistics:_ Dr. Leanne Hinton, (UC, Berkeley)*

          *�The study of endangered languages: From documentary linguistics to*

          *applied linguistics�.*

          In linguistics, the pendulum is swinging from a very formalistic view of linguistic theory focused on English and other world languages back to its focus a century ago on the documentation of endangered languages. But there is an important new twist. A century ago the primary interest was to answer questions of linguistic science, such as the study of language relationships and language families, or linguistic typology and the study of grammatical systems. While such interests are still strong, there is a major new focus on relating the study of languages to the interests of the speech communities being studied. Thus for endangered languages, linguists in the field are forging new kinds of partnerships with members of the community, training interested community members in linguistics, bringing computer technology to communities, assisting in the development of practical writing systems, creating user-friendly language materials

          for community reference, and finding themselves involved in a myriad of projects concerning second-language teaching programs, including community classes, school curriculum development, and other aspects of language revitalization movements. Linguists studying endangered languages generally come out of departments centered around theoretical linguistics and rarely have any training in such fields as education or second language teaching, and so they are often flying blind in their efforts to provide useful service to the community. And yet the kinds of unique skills necessary to serve the specific array of needs presented by

          communities seeking to maintain or revitalize their endangered languages are not easily obtained in current programs of education and foreign language teaching. Thus we are seeing the birth of a new kind of applied

          linguistics, that is being developed now in the field, and will be making its way more and more into the university setting as young linguists self-trained in the new applied linguistics train their own students, many

          of whom will be the community members themselves.



          _Physical:_* Dr. Dennis Etler, Cabrillo College, �The State of Human
          Evolutionary Studies in East and Southeast Asia�*

          The debate surrounding modern human origins and dispersal has largely
          been settled. There is overwhelming genetic evidence attesting to the
          African origins of modern /Homo sapiens /and its dispersal out of Africa
          commencing around 60-75,000 years ago. The genetic evidence indicates
          that early modern humans spread along the Indian Ocean littoral entering
          Australasia between 35-50,000 ya and East Asia perhaps as recently as
          40-45,000 ya. These dates are supported by archaeological and human
          remains in Australia (Malakunanja II, Lake Mungo) and human fossils from
          China (Tianyuan, Hebei). There are, however, a number of outstanding
          questions that still need to be addressed regarding the course of human
          evolution in both Australasia and China. These include, 1) the status of
          recently described fossil and subfossil short statured human remains
          from the Indonesian island of Flores and the Micronesian archipelago of
          Palau, 2) The possible presence of early modern humans in China in
          excess of 100,000 ya and, 3) the role that archaic humans played in the
          emergence of modern human diversity in both East Asia and Australasia.

          *_ Cultural:_ Dr. Carolyn Martin Shaw, (UC Santa Cruz), The Nature of
          Gender: Bodies, Culture and the Performance in the construction of gender.*

          Social constructionist theories of gender, which hold that gender is not
          an essence preceding social expression but an identity that is
          constructed and fluid, have been dominant in anthropology for the past
          several decades. Strong statements of the social construction of gender
          have of late been rocked by transgender/transsexual studies that try to
          encompass understanding of individuals who deeply believe that their
          gender is inherent and unchanging, while their bodies are mutable or, at
          least, can be changed to fit the essence of their perceived gender.
          Ordinary people, non-specialists, including our students in American
          class rooms, also place importance on the materiality of the body as
          they try to grasp the effect of, among other things, �hormones� and
          �PMS.� Another attack on social construction from the biological front
          comes from genetics, which has given us the �female brain� and the �gay
          gene.� Cultural anthropology�s main line of defense is the diversity of
          cultures around the world. We can reasonably assert that the meanings
          given to bodies and physical functions vary such that genetic
          determination is not warranted. And we can argue that science is a part
          of the folk belief system of people in the West. Gender is still a
          social construction through which individuals perform cultural ideas
          about the representation of men and women. Yet a number of
          anthropologists, in recognition of the materiality of the body and its
          functions, have moved toward a middle position that some call �strategic
          constructionism.�

          Archaeology: Dr Kent G. Lightfoot, (UC Berkeley ), "The Archaeology of
          Colonialism: New Insights from the Pacific Coast of North America"

          This paper discusses some of the theoretical and methodological issues
          involved in archaeological investigations of colonialism along the
          Pacific Coast of North America. Archaeologists today undertake
          multi-scalar studies of colonialism that are broadly comparative,
          multi-sited, and collaborative. Drawing upon more than a decade of
          archaeological investigations, the talk highlights some of the lessons
          learned from the study of Russian colonialism in Alaska, Hawaii, and
          California in the late 18^th and early 19^th centuries. Focusing on the
          Russian colony of Fort Ross in northern California, details will be
          presented about how this mercantile enterprise operated, how the colony
          was organized, and how the colonists and local Indians interacted with
          each other. The findings from the Russian colony are then compared to
          recent archaeological investigations of Spanish missions and presidios.
          Examples drawn from the work will be used to speak about comparative
          research, flexible research designs as part of collaborative programs,
          the development of low-intrusive field methods, and the use of multiple
          lines of evidence.

          Applied: Dr. J. A. English-Lueck, (San Jose State University), �Right
          from the Start, Applying Anthropology with Lower Division Students�.

          Applied anthropology is increasingly represented in college and
          university programs, as graduate degree programs, concentrations in
          undergraduate majors, and individual survey courses. Since 1985, the
          majority of post-doctoral jobs are outside of academia, yet our
          undergraduate, especially lower division, curriculum has been slow to
          reflect that reality. The theme of this conference is �inclusion,
          collaboration and engagement,� which indicates that the American
          Anthropological Association recognizes a shift in emphasis in our
          discipline. In my discussion I will discuss the range of applications
          traditionally considered�work in development, policy and government, and
          the critiques that have emerged. I will outline emerging employment
          sectors in nongovernmental organizations, design anthropology and other
          entrepreneurial niches. Examples drawn from the discipline at large, and
          San Jose State University�s Applied Anthropology Master�s program will
          illustrate such applications. Translating these opportunities into
          curriculum is the challenge. A mandate of the Society for Applied
          Anthropology, which states that �We shall provide training which is
          informed, accurate, and relevant to the needs of the larger society,�
          can be read to provide hands-on undergraduate experiences. Community
          research and service-learning can be incorporated into existing and new
          curriculum. Doing so provides opportunities to discuss ethical and
          pragmatic issues of application with both colleagues and students.



          Lloyd Miller wrote:
          >
          > Greetings all,
          >
          > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
          > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
          > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
          > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
          > SACCers like?
          >
          > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
          > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
          >
          > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
          >
          > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
          > education committee(s) you're serving on?
          >
          > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
          > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
          > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
          >
          > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
          > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
          >
          > Best,
          > Lloyd
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          Lloyd Miller wrote:
          >
          > Greetings all,
          >
          > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
          > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
          > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
          > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
          > SACCers like?
          >
          > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
          > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
          >
          > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
          >
          > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
          > education committee(s) you're serving on?
          >
          > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
          > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
          > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
          >
          > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
          > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
          >
          > Best,
          > Lloyd
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kaupp, Ann
          Rob, nice lineup. Good idea to put in AN column. ... From: rob edwards [mailto:redwards@cabrillo.edu] Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 12:13 PM To:
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 9, 2008
            Rob, nice lineup. Good idea to put in AN column.



            -----Original Message-----
            From: rob edwards [mailto:redwards@...]
            Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 12:13 PM
            To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Cc: Maren Wilson; Mary Gilliland; Mark Lewine; Kaupp, Ann; Diane
            Wilhelm; Becky Stein-Frankle (w); Ann Popplestone; Patricia Hamlen;
            Laura Gonzalez; George Rodgers; Dianne Chidester; Deborah Shepherd; Bob
            Muckle; Melvin Johnson; Phil Stein; Chuck Ellenbaum; Jo Rainy Rodgers
            Subject: Re: [SACC-L] November AN column

            Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields
            presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am
            puzzling over the timing of the Symposium on Sunday and wonder if a post
            symposium dinner is appropriate. So many people will be leaving for home
            . While the speakers are all local to the Bay area, only the Rodgers and
            I are. If this tradition is to continue, I would guess it should be a
            lunch which follows immediately. So how many of you would stay?/Cheers

            Five Fields in Anthropology, SACC Invited Panel/Symposium, American
            Anthropological Association, November, 2008, Chair, Rob Edwards,
            Cabrillo College, California

            This is an invited panel/session of the Society for Anthropology in
            Community Colleges which has become a valued tradition at the Annual
            Meetings of the American Anthropology Association. Panelists are
            recruited from the five fields of anthropology: Applied, Archaeology,
            Cultural, Linguistics and Physical. Each panelist has chosen some aspect
            of their field to synthesize or summarize so that those who are
            interested in lower division courses in those fields can be refreshed
            and updated on some aspect of the field. Each panelist has about fifteen
            minutes for their presentation. Their written papers will be published
            in a future issue of 'Teaching Anthropology", a newsletter of SACC. (/At
            least one presenter will need a LCD projector/.)

            *_Linguistics:_ Dr. Leanne Hinton, (UC, Berkeley)*

            *"The study of endangered languages: From documentary linguistics to*

            *applied linguistics".*

            In linguistics, the pendulum is swinging from a very formalistic view
            of linguistic theory focused on English and other world languages back
            to its focus a century ago on the documentation of endangered languages.
            But there is an important new twist. A century ago the primary interest
            was to answer questions of linguistic science, such as the study of
            language relationships and language families, or linguistic typology and
            the study of grammatical systems. While such interests are still
            strong, there is a major new focus on relating the study of languages to
            the interests of the speech communities being studied. Thus for
            endangered languages, linguists in the field are forging new kinds of
            partnerships with members of the community, training interested
            community members in linguistics, bringing computer technology to
            communities, assisting in the development of practical writing systems,
            creating user-friendly language materials

            for community reference, and finding themselves involved in a myriad of
            projects concerning second-language teaching programs, including
            community classes, school curriculum development, and other aspects of
            language revitalization movements. Linguists studying endangered
            languages generally come out of departments centered around theoretical
            linguistics and rarely have any training in such fields as education or
            second language teaching, and so they are often flying blind in their
            efforts to provide useful service to the community. And yet the kinds
            of unique skills necessary to serve the specific array of needs
            presented by

            communities seeking to maintain or revitalize their endangered languages
            are not easily obtained in current programs of education and foreign
            language teaching. Thus we are seeing the birth of a new kind of
            applied

            linguistics, that is being developed now in the field, and will be
            making its way more and more into the university setting as young
            linguists self-trained in the new applied linguistics train their own
            students, many

            of whom will be the community members themselves.



            _Physical:_* Dr. Dennis Etler, Cabrillo College, "The State of Human
            Evolutionary Studies in East and Southeast Asia"*

            The debate surrounding modern human origins and dispersal has largely
            been settled. There is overwhelming genetic evidence attesting to the
            African origins of modern /Homo sapiens /and its dispersal out of Africa
            commencing around 60-75,000 years ago. The genetic evidence indicates
            that early modern humans spread along the Indian Ocean littoral entering
            Australasia between 35-50,000 ya and East Asia perhaps as recently as
            40-45,000 ya. These dates are supported by archaeological and human
            remains in Australia (Malakunanja II, Lake Mungo) and human fossils from
            China (Tianyuan, Hebei). There are, however, a number of outstanding
            questions that still need to be addressed regarding the course of human
            evolution in both Australasia and China. These include, 1) the status of
            recently described fossil and subfossil short statured human remains
            from the Indonesian island of Flores and the Micronesian archipelago of
            Palau, 2) The possible presence of early modern humans in China in
            excess of 100,000 ya and, 3) the role that archaic humans played in the
            emergence of modern human diversity in both East Asia and Australasia.

            *_ Cultural:_ Dr. Carolyn Martin Shaw, (UC Santa Cruz), The Nature of
            Gender: Bodies, Culture and the Performance in the construction of
            gender.*

            Social constructionist theories of gender, which hold that gender is not
            an essence preceding social expression but an identity that is
            constructed and fluid, have been dominant in anthropology for the past
            several decades. Strong statements of the social construction of gender
            have of late been rocked by transgender/transsexual studies that try to
            encompass understanding of individuals who deeply believe that their
            gender is inherent and unchanging, while their bodies are mutable or, at
            least, can be changed to fit the essence of their perceived gender.
            Ordinary people, non-specialists, including our students in American
            class rooms, also place importance on the materiality of the body as
            they try to grasp the effect of, among other things, "hormones" and
            "PMS." Another attack on social construction from the biological front
            comes from genetics, which has given us the "female brain" and the "gay
            gene." Cultural anthropology's main line of defense is the diversity of
            cultures around the world. We can reasonably assert that the meanings
            given to bodies and physical functions vary such that genetic
            determination is not warranted. And we can argue that science is a part
            of the folk belief system of people in the West. Gender is still a
            social construction through which individuals perform cultural ideas
            about the representation of men and women. Yet a number of
            anthropologists, in recognition of the materiality of the body and its
            functions, have moved toward a middle position that some call "strategic
            constructionism."

            Archaeology: Dr Kent G. Lightfoot, (UC Berkeley ), "The Archaeology of
            Colonialism: New Insights from the Pacific Coast of North America"

            This paper discusses some of the theoretical and methodological issues
            involved in archaeological investigations of colonialism along the
            Pacific Coast of North America. Archaeologists today undertake
            multi-scalar studies of colonialism that are broadly comparative,
            multi-sited, and collaborative. Drawing upon more than a decade of
            archaeological investigations, the talk highlights some of the lessons
            learned from the study of Russian colonialism in Alaska, Hawaii, and
            California in the late 18^th and early 19^th centuries. Focusing on the
            Russian colony of Fort Ross in northern California, details will be
            presented about how this mercantile enterprise operated, how the colony
            was organized, and how the colonists and local Indians interacted with
            each other. The findings from the Russian colony are then compared to
            recent archaeological investigations of Spanish missions and presidios.
            Examples drawn from the work will be used to speak about comparative
            research, flexible research designs as part of collaborative programs,
            the development of low-intrusive field methods, and the use of multiple
            lines of evidence.

            Applied: Dr. J. A. English-Lueck, (San Jose State University), "Right
            from the Start, Applying Anthropology with Lower Division Students".

            Applied anthropology is increasingly represented in college and
            university programs, as graduate degree programs, concentrations in
            undergraduate majors, and individual survey courses. Since 1985, the
            majority of post-doctoral jobs are outside of academia, yet our
            undergraduate, especially lower division, curriculum has been slow to
            reflect that reality. The theme of this conference is "inclusion,
            collaboration and engagement," which indicates that the American
            Anthropological Association recognizes a shift in emphasis in our
            discipline. In my discussion I will discuss the range of applications
            traditionally considered-work in development, policy and government, and
            the critiques that have emerged. I will outline emerging employment
            sectors in nongovernmental organizations, design anthropology and other
            entrepreneurial niches. Examples drawn from the discipline at large, and
            San Jose State University's Applied Anthropology Master's program will
            illustrate such applications. Translating these opportunities into
            curriculum is the challenge. A mandate of the Society for Applied
            Anthropology, which states that "We shall provide training which is
            informed, accurate, and relevant to the needs of the larger society,"
            can be read to provide hands-on undergraduate experiences. Community
            research and service-learning can be incorporated into existing and new
            curriculum. Doing so provides opportunities to discuss ethical and
            pragmatic issues of application with both colleagues and students.



            Lloyd Miller wrote:
            >
            > Greetings all,
            >
            > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and Mary

            > Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new, perhaps

            > a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers, plans, even

            > tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff SACCers like?
            >
            > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
            > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
            >
            > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
            >
            > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
            > education committee(s) you're serving on?
            >
            > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
            > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
            > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
            >
            > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
            > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
            >
            > Best,
            > Lloyd
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >


            Lloyd Miller wrote:
            >
            > Greetings all,
            >
            > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and Mary

            > Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new, perhaps

            > a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers, plans, even

            > tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff SACCers like?
            >
            > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
            > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
            >
            > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
            >
            > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
            > education committee(s) you're serving on?
            >
            > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
            > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
            > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
            >
            > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
            > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
            >
            > Best,
            > Lloyd
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
          • Dianne Chidester
            Rob, This looks great! I m sorry I won t be able to be there, but I ll be sure to read about it in SACC Notes. -- Dianne ... From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 9, 2008
              Rob, This looks great! I'm sorry I won't be able to be there, but I'll
              be sure to read about it in SACC Notes. -- Dianne

              -----Original Message-----
              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of rob edwards
              Sent: Tuesday, September 09, 2008 12:13 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Cc: Maren Wilson; Mary Gilliland; Mark Lewine; Ann Kaupp; Diane Wilhelm;
              Becky Stein-Frankle (w); Ann Popplestone; Patricia Hamlen; Laura
              Gonzalez; George Rodgers; Dianne Chidester; Deborah Shepherd; Bob
              Muckle; Melvin Johnson; Phil Stein; Chuck Ellenbaum; Jo Rainy Rodgers
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] November AN column

              Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields
              presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am
              puzzling over the timing of the Symposium on Sunday and wonder if a post

              symposium dinner is appropriate. So many people will be leaving for home

              . While the speakers are all local to the Bay area, only the Rodgers and

              I are. If this tradition is to continue, I would guess it should be a
              lunch which follows immediately. So how many of you would stay?/Cheers

              Five Fields in Anthropology, SACC Invited Panel/Symposium, American
              Anthropological Association, November, 2008, Chair, Rob Edwards,
              Cabrillo College, California

              This is an invited panel/session of the Society for Anthropology in
              Community Colleges which has become a valued tradition at the Annual
              Meetings of the American Anthropology Association. Panelists are
              recruited from the five fields of anthropology: Applied, Archaeology,
              Cultural, Linguistics and Physical. Each panelist has chosen some aspect

              of their field to synthesize or summarize so that those who are
              interested in lower division courses in those fields can be refreshed
              and updated on some aspect of the field. Each panelist has about fifteen

              minutes for their presentation. Their written papers will be published
              in a future issue of 'Teaching Anthropology", a newsletter of SACC. (/At

              least one presenter will need a LCD projector/.)

              *_Linguistics:_ Dr. Leanne Hinton, (UC, Berkeley)*

              *"The study of endangered languages: From documentary linguistics to*

              *applied linguistics".*

              In linguistics, the pendulum is swinging from a very formalistic view
              of linguistic theory focused on English and other world languages back
              to its focus a century ago on the documentation of endangered languages.
              But there is an important new twist. A century ago the primary interest
              was to answer questions of linguistic science, such as the study of
              language relationships and language families, or linguistic typology and
              the study of grammatical systems. While such interests are still
              strong, there is a major new focus on relating the study of languages to
              the interests of the speech communities being studied. Thus for
              endangered languages, linguists in the field are forging new kinds of
              partnerships with members of the community, training interested
              community members in linguistics, bringing computer technology to
              communities, assisting in the development of practical writing systems,
              creating user-friendly language materials

              for community reference, and finding themselves involved in a myriad of
              projects concerning second-language teaching programs, including
              community classes, school curriculum development, and other aspects of
              language revitalization movements. Linguists studying endangered
              languages generally come out of departments centered around theoretical
              linguistics and rarely have any training in such fields as education or
              second language teaching, and so they are often flying blind in their
              efforts to provide useful service to the community. And yet the kinds
              of unique skills necessary to serve the specific array of needs
              presented by

              communities seeking to maintain or revitalize their endangered languages
              are not easily obtained in current programs of education and foreign
              language teaching. Thus we are seeing the birth of a new kind of
              applied

              linguistics, that is being developed now in the field, and will be
              making its way more and more into the university setting as young
              linguists self-trained in the new applied linguistics train their own
              students, many

              of whom will be the community members themselves.



              _Physical:_* Dr. Dennis Etler, Cabrillo College, "The State of Human
              Evolutionary Studies in East and Southeast Asia"*

              The debate surrounding modern human origins and dispersal has largely
              been settled. There is overwhelming genetic evidence attesting to the
              African origins of modern /Homo sapiens /and its dispersal out of Africa

              commencing around 60-75,000 years ago. The genetic evidence indicates
              that early modern humans spread along the Indian Ocean littoral entering

              Australasia between 35-50,000 ya and East Asia perhaps as recently as
              40-45,000 ya. These dates are supported by archaeological and human
              remains in Australia (Malakunanja II, Lake Mungo) and human fossils from

              China (Tianyuan, Hebei). There are, however, a number of outstanding
              questions that still need to be addressed regarding the course of human
              evolution in both Australasia and China. These include, 1) the status of

              recently described fossil and subfossil short statured human remains
              from the Indonesian island of Flores and the Micronesian archipelago of
              Palau, 2) The possible presence of early modern humans in China in
              excess of 100,000 ya and, 3) the role that archaic humans played in the
              emergence of modern human diversity in both East Asia and Australasia.

              *_ Cultural:_ Dr. Carolyn Martin Shaw, (UC Santa Cruz), The Nature of
              Gender: Bodies, Culture and the Performance in the construction of
              gender.*

              Social constructionist theories of gender, which hold that gender is not

              an essence preceding social expression but an identity that is
              constructed and fluid, have been dominant in anthropology for the past
              several decades. Strong statements of the social construction of gender
              have of late been rocked by transgender/transsexual studies that try to
              encompass understanding of individuals who deeply believe that their
              gender is inherent and unchanging, while their bodies are mutable or, at

              least, can be changed to fit the essence of their perceived gender.
              Ordinary people, non-specialists, including our students in American
              class rooms, also place importance on the materiality of the body as
              they try to grasp the effect of, among other things, "hormones" and
              "PMS." Another attack on social construction from the biological front
              comes from genetics, which has given us the "female brain" and the "gay
              gene." Cultural anthropology's main line of defense is the diversity of
              cultures around the world. We can reasonably assert that the meanings
              given to bodies and physical functions vary such that genetic
              determination is not warranted. And we can argue that science is a part
              of the folk belief system of people in the West. Gender is still a
              social construction through which individuals perform cultural ideas
              about the representation of men and women. Yet a number of
              anthropologists, in recognition of the materiality of the body and its
              functions, have moved toward a middle position that some call "strategic

              constructionism."

              Archaeology: Dr Kent G. Lightfoot, (UC Berkeley ), "The Archaeology of
              Colonialism: New Insights from the Pacific Coast of North America"

              This paper discusses some of the theoretical and methodological issues
              involved in archaeological investigations of colonialism along the
              Pacific Coast of North America. Archaeologists today undertake
              multi-scalar studies of colonialism that are broadly comparative,
              multi-sited, and collaborative. Drawing upon more than a decade of
              archaeological investigations, the talk highlights some of the lessons
              learned from the study of Russian colonialism in Alaska, Hawaii, and
              California in the late 18^th and early 19^th centuries. Focusing on the
              Russian colony of Fort Ross in northern California, details will be
              presented about how this mercantile enterprise operated, how the colony
              was organized, and how the colonists and local Indians interacted with
              each other. The findings from the Russian colony are then compared to
              recent archaeological investigations of Spanish missions and presidios.
              Examples drawn from the work will be used to speak about comparative
              research, flexible research designs as part of collaborative programs,
              the development of low-intrusive field methods, and the use of multiple
              lines of evidence.

              Applied: Dr. J. A. English-Lueck, (San Jose State University), "Right
              from the Start, Applying Anthropology with Lower Division Students".

              Applied anthropology is increasingly represented in college and
              university programs, as graduate degree programs, concentrations in
              undergraduate majors, and individual survey courses. Since 1985, the
              majority of post-doctoral jobs are outside of academia, yet our
              undergraduate, especially lower division, curriculum has been slow to
              reflect that reality. The theme of this conference is "inclusion,
              collaboration and engagement," which indicates that the American
              Anthropological Association recognizes a shift in emphasis in our
              discipline. In my discussion I will discuss the range of applications
              traditionally considered-work in development, policy and government, and

              the critiques that have emerged. I will outline emerging employment
              sectors in nongovernmental organizations, design anthropology and other
              entrepreneurial niches. Examples drawn from the discipline at large, and

              San Jose State University's Applied Anthropology Master's program will
              illustrate such applications. Translating these opportunities into
              curriculum is the challenge. A mandate of the Society for Applied
              Anthropology, which states that "We shall provide training which is
              informed, accurate, and relevant to the needs of the larger society,"
              can be read to provide hands-on undergraduate experiences. Community
              research and service-learning can be incorporated into existing and new
              curriculum. Doing so provides opportunities to discuss ethical and
              pragmatic issues of application with both colleagues and students.



              Lloyd Miller wrote:
              >
              > Greetings all,
              >
              > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
              > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
              > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
              > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
              > SACCers like?
              >
              > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
              > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
              >
              > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
              >
              > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
              > education committee(s) you're serving on?
              >
              > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
              > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
              > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
              >
              > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
              > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
              >
              > Best,
              > Lloyd
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >


              Lloyd Miller wrote:
              >
              > Greetings all,
              >
              > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
              > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
              > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
              > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
              > SACCers like?
              >
              > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
              > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
              >
              > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
              >
              > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
              > education committee(s) you're serving on?
              >
              > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
              > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
              > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
              >
              > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
              > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
              >
              > Best,
              > Lloyd
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


              ------------------------------------

              Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
              Groups Links




              This electronic mail message is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender by reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. To the best of our ability and knowledge, this mail message has been scanned and is free of viruses and malware.
            • Lloyd Miller
              Thanks, Rob. This helps a lot. I too am puzzled about the scheduled time of the 5-fields Symposium. I m driving and am staying at the Adante Hotel (about
              Message 6 of 7 , Sep 10, 2008
                Thanks, Rob. This helps a lot. I too am puzzled about the scheduled
                time of the 5-fields Symposium. I'm driving and am staying at the
                Adante Hotel (about 2-3 blocks from the Hilton). Checkout time is
                noon, so I would need to check out before the meeting and ask that
                they allow me to pick up my car from their lot afterward without
                additional charge. I would be delighted to go to lunch IF the
                restaurant has parking at a reasonable rate. As you know, parking in
                SF is difficult to impossible and sometimes prohibitively expensive.
                Lloyd
                lloyd.miller@...




                On Sep 9, 2008, at 11:13 AM, rob edwards wrote:

                > Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields
                > presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am
                > puzzling over the timing of the Symposium on Sunday and wonder if a
                > post
                > symposium dinner is appropriate. So many people will be leaving for
                > home
                > . While the speakers are all local to the Bay area, only the
                > Rodgers and
                > I are. If this tradition is to continue, I would guess it should be a
                > lunch which follows immediately. So how many of you would stay?/Cheers



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • anthony balzano
                Rob, I can make it — my flight does not leave SFO until 10pm. However, I will be in a concurrent sessions that morning (Shifting Identities in the
                Message 7 of 7 , Sep 11, 2008
                  Rob,

                  I can make it — my flight does not leave SFO until 10pm. However, I
                  will be in a concurrent sessions that morning (Shifting Identities in
                  the Americas), so will have to touch base with you beforehand to arrange
                  a time and place to meet up with you.

                  Regards,
                  Tony Balzano


                  Anthony Balzano, Ph.D.
                  Professor of Anthropology & Sociology
                  Chairperson, Department of Social Sciences & History
                  Sussex County Community College
                  1 College Hill
                  Newton, NJ 07461
                  973-300-2177


                  >>> rob edwards <redwards@...> 09/09/2008 12:13 PM >>>
                  Hi everyone (especially Lloyd), Below is the info on the 5-Fields
                  presentation if you want to include part of that in the column. I am
                  puzzling over the timing of the Symposium on Sunday and wonder if a
                  post
                  symposium dinner is appropriate. So many people will be leaving for
                  home
                  . While the speakers are all local to the Bay area, only the Rodgers
                  and
                  I are. If this tradition is to continue, I would guess it should be a
                  lunch which follows immediately. So how many of you would stay?/Cheers

                  Five Fields in Anthropology, SACC Invited Panel/Symposium, American
                  Anthropological Association, November, 2008, Chair, Rob Edwards,
                  Cabrillo College, California

                  This is an invited panel/session of the Society for Anthropology in
                  Community Colleges which has become a valued tradition at the Annual
                  Meetings of the American Anthropology Association. Panelists are
                  recruited from the five fields of anthropology: Applied, Archaeology,
                  Cultural, Linguistics and Physical. Each panelist has chosen some
                  aspect
                  of their field to synthesize or summarize so that those who are
                  interested in lower division courses in those fields can be refreshed
                  and updated on some aspect of the field. Each panelist has about
                  fifteen
                  minutes for their presentation. Their written papers will be published

                  in a future issue of ‘Teaching Anthropology”, a newsletter of SACC.
                  (/At
                  least one presenter will need a LCD projector/.)

                  *_Linguistics:_ Dr. Leanne Hinton, (UC, Berkeley)*

                  *“The study of endangered languages: From documentary linguistics
                  to*

                  *applied linguistics”.*

                  In linguistics, the pendulum is swinging from a very formalistic view
                  of linguistic theory focused on English and other world languages back
                  to its focus a century ago on the documentation of endangered languages.
                  But there is an important new twist. A century ago the primary
                  interest was to answer questions of linguistic science, such as the
                  study of language relationships and language families, or linguistic
                  typology and the study of grammatical systems. While such interests are
                  still strong, there is a major new focus on relating the study of
                  languages to the interests of the speech communities being studied.
                  Thus for endangered languages, linguists in the field are forging new
                  kinds of partnerships with members of the community, training interested
                  community members in linguistics, bringing computer technology to
                  communities, assisting in the development of practical writing systems,
                  creating user-friendly language materials

                  for community reference, and finding themselves involved in a myriad of
                  projects concerning second-language teaching programs, including
                  community classes, school curriculum development, and other aspects of
                  language revitalization movements. Linguists studying endangered
                  languages generally come out of departments centered around theoretical
                  linguistics and rarely have any training in such fields as education or
                  second language teaching, and so they are often flying blind in their
                  efforts to provide useful service to the community. And yet the kinds
                  of unique skills necessary to serve the specific array of needs
                  presented by

                  communities seeking to maintain or revitalize their endangered
                  languages are not easily obtained in current programs of education and
                  foreign language teaching. Thus we are seeing the birth of a new kind
                  of applied

                  linguistics, that is being developed now in the field, and will be
                  making its way more and more into the university setting as young
                  linguists self-trained in the new applied linguistics train their own
                  students, many

                  of whom will be the community members themselves.



                  _Physical:_* Dr. Dennis Etler, Cabrillo College, “The State of Human

                  Evolutionary Studies in East and Southeast Asia”*

                  The debate surrounding modern human origins and dispersal has largely
                  been settled. There is overwhelming genetic evidence attesting to the
                  African origins of modern /Homo sapiens /and its dispersal out of
                  Africa
                  commencing around 60-75,000 years ago. The genetic evidence indicates
                  that early modern humans spread along the Indian Ocean littoral
                  entering
                  Australasia between 35-50,000 ya and East Asia perhaps as recently as
                  40-45,000 ya. These dates are supported by archaeological and human
                  remains in Australia (Malakunanja II, Lake Mungo) and human fossils
                  from
                  China (Tianyuan, Hebei). There are, however, a number of outstanding
                  questions that still need to be addressed regarding the course of human

                  evolution in both Australasia and China. These include, 1) the status
                  of
                  recently described fossil and subfossil short statured human remains
                  from the Indonesian island of Flores and the Micronesian archipelago of

                  Palau, 2) The possible presence of early modern humans in China in
                  excess of 100,000 ya and, 3) the role that archaic humans played in the

                  emergence of modern human diversity in both East Asia and Australasia.

                  *_ Cultural:_ Dr. Carolyn Martin Shaw, (UC Santa Cruz), The Nature of
                  Gender: Bodies, Culture and the Performance in the construction of
                  gender.*

                  Social constructionist theories of gender, which hold that gender is
                  not
                  an essence preceding social expression but an identity that is
                  constructed and fluid, have been dominant in anthropology for the past

                  several decades. Strong statements of the social construction of gender

                  have of late been rocked by transgender/transsexual studies that try to

                  encompass understanding of individuals who deeply believe that their
                  gender is inherent and unchanging, while their bodies are mutable or,
                  at
                  least, can be changed to fit the essence of their perceived gender.
                  Ordinary people, non-specialists, including our students in American
                  class rooms, also place importance on the materiality of the body as
                  they try to grasp the effect of, among other things, “hormones” and

                  “PMS.” Another attack on social construction from the biological
                  front
                  comes from genetics, which has given us the “female brain” and the
                  “gay
                  gene.” Cultural anthropology’s main line of defense is the
                  diversity of
                  cultures around the world. We can reasonably assert that the meanings
                  given to bodies and physical functions vary such that genetic
                  determination is not warranted. And we can argue that science is a part

                  of the folk belief system of people in the West. Gender is still a
                  social construction through which individuals perform cultural ideas
                  about the representation of men and women. Yet a number of
                  anthropologists, in recognition of the materiality of the body and its

                  functions, have moved toward a middle position that some call
                  “strategic
                  constructionism.”

                  Archaeology: Dr Kent G. Lightfoot, (UC Berkeley ), "The Archaeology of

                  Colonialism: New Insights from the Pacific Coast of North America"

                  This paper discusses some of the theoretical and methodological issues

                  involved in archaeological investigations of colonialism along the
                  Pacific Coast of North America. Archaeologists today undertake
                  multi-scalar studies of colonialism that are broadly comparative,
                  multi-sited, and collaborative. Drawing upon more than a decade of
                  archaeological investigations, the talk highlights some of the lessons

                  learned from the study of Russian colonialism in Alaska, Hawaii, and
                  California in the late 18^th and early 19^th centuries. Focusing on the

                  Russian colony of Fort Ross in northern California, details will be
                  presented about how this mercantile enterprise operated, how the colony

                  was organized, and how the colonists and local Indians interacted with

                  each other. The findings from the Russian colony are then compared to
                  recent archaeological investigations of Spanish missions and presidios.

                  Examples drawn from the work will be used to speak about comparative
                  research, flexible research designs as part of collaborative programs,

                  the development of low-intrusive field methods, and the use of multiple

                  lines of evidence.

                  Applied: Dr. J. A. English-Lueck, (San Jose State University), “Right

                  from the Start, Applying Anthropology with Lower Division Students”.

                  Applied anthropology is increasingly represented in college and
                  university programs, as graduate degree programs, concentrations in
                  undergraduate majors, and individual survey courses. Since 1985, the
                  majority of post-doctoral jobs are outside of academia, yet our
                  undergraduate, especially lower division, curriculum has been slow to
                  reflect that reality. The theme of this conference is “inclusion,
                  collaboration and engagement,” which indicates that the American
                  Anthropological Association recognizes a shift in emphasis in our
                  discipline. In my discussion I will discuss the range of applications
                  traditionally considered—work in development, policy and government,
                  and
                  the critiques that have emerged. I will outline emerging employment
                  sectors in nongovernmental organizations, design anthropology and other

                  entrepreneurial niches. Examples drawn from the discipline at large,
                  and
                  San Jose State University’s Applied Anthropology Master’s program
                  will
                  illustrate such applications. Translating these opportunities into
                  curriculum is the challenge. A mandate of the Society for Applied
                  Anthropology, which states that “We shall provide training which is
                  informed, accurate, and relevant to the needs of the larger society,”

                  can be read to provide hands-on undergraduate experiences. Community
                  research and service-learning can be incorporated into existing and new

                  curriculum. Doing so provides opportunities to discuss ethical and
                  pragmatic issues of application with both colleagues and students.



                  Lloyd Miller wrote:
                  >
                  > Greetings all,
                  >
                  > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
                  > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
                  > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
                  > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
                  > SACCers like?
                  >
                  > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
                  > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
                  >
                  > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
                  >
                  > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
                  > education committee(s) you're serving on?
                  >
                  > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
                  > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
                  > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
                  >
                  > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
                  > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
                  >
                  > Best,
                  > Lloyd
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >


                  Lloyd Miller wrote:
                  >
                  > Greetings all,
                  >
                  > The Nov AN column is due Sep 15. What should we put in? Maren and
                  > Mary Kay, anything new on the Tucson meetings? Or if nothing's new,
                  > perhaps a few paragraphs highlighting field trips, guest speakers,
                  > plans, even tantalizing restaurants, you know, the kinds of stuff
                  > SACCers like?
                  >
                  > Laura, a few words on online stuff--blogging, the next online
                  > newsletter, your take on "second life" virtual sites?
                  >
                  > Deborah, the latest on remodeling the website, etc.?
                  >
                  > Mark, a paragraph on the AAA Dept. Services Program and/or the
                  > education committee(s) you're serving on?
                  >
                  > Anyone: new trips, programs, research, things happening on your
                  > campus, things you'd like (or not like) to happen on your campus, in
                  > the field of anthropology, in the world, etc.?
                  >
                  > Bev and I are off on a motor trip Sep 18--should return around Oct 6
                  > or 7--but we're taking a laptop so I won't be totally out of touch.
                  >
                  > Best,
                  > Lloyd
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


                  ------------------------------------

                  Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/Yahoo!
                  Groups Links
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