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Re: [SACC-L] Physical Anthropology and Anatomy

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  • AJ Petto
    I teach a multi-section A&P course at UW-Milwaukee in the Biological Sciences Department. We have 816 students enrolled in 34 lab sections. I am a
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 26, 2008
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      I teach a multi-section A&P course at UW-Milwaukee in the Biological
      Sciences Department. We have 816 students enrolled in 34 lab sections. I
      am a bioanthropologist hired specifically because of my gross anatomy
      background. Six of the 19 TAs are anthropology graduate students, and I
      am about to hire a 7th. My summer replacement was another physical
      anthropologist with a specialty in forensics.

      We teach the A&P course as a service course --- a natural sciences lab
      course that is a foundation for health sciences, nursing, athletic
      training, pre-professional, and a few other programs. However, our
      department (as many contemporary biology departments) has no
      concentration in gross anatomy (human or comparative) for our graduate
      students. So, if they didn't get it as undergrads, they are not into it
      as graduate students. Our own grad students are well prepared for the
      cellular and biochemical parts of the course, but not the
      muscles-bones-joints (which is about 40% of the first semester).

      My advice to anthro graduate students and soon-to-be teachers would be
      to get up to speed on cellular stuff and basic biochemistry; that is the
      stuff that mainstream bio departments are doing on their own. If you
      know that stuff and can add it to your knowledge of
      muscles-bones-joints-nerves, then you fit the bill.

      Of course, the one thing that seals it is to have ONE anthro do the
      course ONE time and then it is a lock.

      Anj Petto

      Philip Stein wrote:
      >
      >
      > I learned yesterday that our Life Sciences Department is having problems
      > finding instructors to teach Anatomy. It seems that medical students are
      > no longer taking gross anatomy and are picking up their anatomy
      > piecemeal in other courses. What anatomy there is now in our local med
      > schools is being taught by physical anthropologists. Thus the Life
      > Sciences Department is looking to hire part-time physical
      > anthropologists to teach anatomy. We are fortunate in that we get along
      > with our biologists and perhaps there are opportunities for some joint
      > ventures.
      >
      > Do any of you have physical anthropologists teaching anatomy on your
      > campus or biologists teaching physical anthropology? Are there any joint
      > projects between anthropology and biology on your campus, such as cross
      > listing of courses, etc.?
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Phil
      >

      --
      Andrew J Petto, PhD
      Senior Lecturer
      Department of Biological Sciences
      University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee
      PO Box 413
      Milwaukee WI 53201-0413
      414.229.6784
      fax: 414.229.3926
      ajpetto@...
      http://www.uwm.edu/~ajpetto
      http://www.uwm.edu/Dept/Biology/Docs/Faculty/ajpetto.html

      *************
      Now Available!!! Scientists Confront Intelligent Design and Creationism.
      http://www.uwm.edu/~ajpetto/scc2.htm
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      "There is no word in the language that I revere more than teacher. None.
      My heart sings when a kid refers to me as his teacher and it always has."

      -- Pat Conroy
      The Prince of Tides
    • rob edwards
      Cabrillo has a PhD in Physical Anthropology, Robin Mcfarland, teaching Anatomy and Human Physiology. ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 28, 2008
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        Cabrillo has a PhD in Physical Anthropology, Robin Mcfarland, teaching
        Anatomy and Human Physiology.

        anthropmor@... wrote:
        >
        >
        > In a message dated 8/26/2008 1:39:54 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
        > stein39@... <mailto:stein39%40att.net> writes:
        >
        > Do any of you have physical anthropologists teaching anatomy on your
        > campus
        > or biologists teaching physical anthropology? Are there any joint
        > projects
        > between anthropology and biology on your campus, such as cross listing of
        > courses, etc.?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > It was always cross listed at UIC ( University of Illinois, Chicago) and
        > Jack Prost taught it for years.
        > Mike Pavlik
        >
        > **************It's only a deal if it's where you want to go. Find your
        > travel
        > deal here.
        > (http://information.travel.aol.com/deals?ncid=aoltrv00050000000047
        > <http://information.travel.aol.com/deals?ncid=aoltrv00050000000047>)
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Gilliland, Mary
        Pima Community College is a multi-campus college. The West Campus, where Anthropology is strongest, has a 4-field Anthro program, with a full-time
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 28, 2008
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          Pima Community College is a multi-campus college. The West Campus,
          where Anthropology is strongest, has a 4-field Anthro program, with a
          full-time Cultural/Linguistic person, a full-time Archaeology person and
          a full-time Bio Anthro person. But no one in Anthro teaches A & P.



          We also have a HUGE Nursing program, and in support of that we have 2
          Biology faculty members hired specifically to teach Anatomy and
          Physiology. We also hire quite a few adjuncts to supplement the A & P
          teaching. In addition, we have multiple semesters of A & P.



          We have an Intro to Biology for Health Sciences, which has parts of the
          Anatomy & Physiology content, slowed down, as an intro. We have a
          second Intro level class for some of the Health Related programs that
          includes more Anatomy, less Physiology, and some other aspects of
          Biology that pertain to those programs. Then we have a regular Anatomy
          and Physiology I and II, and Nursing and some HRP students take both
          courses. Finally we have an A & P review, because our Nursing students
          usually take these classes as pre-requisites, and then need to bone up
          when they are finally into the Nursing classes, which may be 2 years or
          more after finishing Anatomy and Physiology.



          SO... a long message to say that Anthropology does not have a hand in
          any of this, but we do teach Evolutionary Biology - which cross-lists
          with Biology, and a core course in Biological Anthropology which
          transfers directly to the University of Arizona as a sophomore level
          class.



          Mary Kay Gilliland

          Pima Comm. College

          Tucson, AZ



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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