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shared spring air: from an anthro web class

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  • Mark Lewine
    To Colleagues: Buried in my 7 class semester overload with 3 web courses with nightly discussion boards to read, I get this inspired message that gave me
    Message 1 of 5 , Apr 12 4:38 PM
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      To Colleagues: Buried in my 7 class semester overload with 3 web courses with nightly discussion boards to read, I get this inspired message that gave me renewed faith in students, their values and appreciation for our field in today's world. Enjoy, you deserve it:



      Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 10:01:05 PM EDT
      Subject: RE: Discussion Topic for Chapt. 1: What is anthropology to you?

      I have a very simple idea about the purpose of anthropology in my life. I developed my philosophy while in teacher education and during my
      Cultures of Africa class. It has been further reinforced by my time
      abroad and in the classroom teaching. As a social studies and history teacher, my philosophy is that I must prepare students to live in an increasingly global community. Approximately 30+ years ago, students in Cleveland were battling against other schools and cities in the US. Today they battle economically against other countries. They are also bombarded by other cultures thanks to resources such as the internet. Diversity is the modern trend and those who do not adapt will be swept away. I have found that the older and less educated people are incapable of understanding what is going on in society. For them, the world is coming to an end because "there is too much color" or "too many crazy ideas." In my time as a warehouse worker and machinist, I have heard these opinions expressed time and again. The sad fact is that these people will remain aloof and be unable to advance in society. What's worse, it is these very same men that impart such dangerous, negative, and ethnocentric attitudes to the younger generation. Like it or not, the younger generation is living in a time of major cultural diversification. When I was a student teacher, and teaching in Europe, teenagers always had questions about other people. Common questions from American kids were: "Why are the Chinese coming here? What's wrong in China?" or "Do you think we will all be speaking Chinese in a few years?" and "Why do people have different skin colors and why do races act differently?" From European students, the biggest question I heard was "Why do Americans smile so much and so big?" In other words, anthropology is in our blood. Thanks to the internet and fantastic transportation, people and ideas are traveling faster than ever before. As a consequence, we have questions about foreign ideas and groups we come into contact with. Historically, these contacts either involved trade or war. War is quickly becoming an undesirable option since the nations of the world depend on one another. So, that means we can make barriers and deny ourselves the benefits or we can learn and adapt. I believe that anthropology is the medium by which we can study others, accept differences, and adapt.



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • anthropmor@AOL.COM
      well, that had to perk up your afternoon. Good to see for all of us. Mike Pavlik **************It s Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money &
      Message 2 of 5 , Apr 12 7:53 PM
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        well, that had to perk up your afternoon.
        Good to see for all of us.
        Mike Pavlik



        **************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money &
        Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolcmp00300000002850)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lloyd Miller
        Thanks for sharing this, Mark. It was nice to hear it from a former anthropology student. However, I couldn t help but notice some similarities with what
        Message 3 of 5 , Apr 13 10:33 AM
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          Thanks for sharing this, Mark. It was nice to hear it from a former
          anthropology student.

          However, I couldn't help but notice some similarities with what
          Barack Obama said in PA recently and for which he's been roundly
          criticized by his opponents as being elitist and out of touch with
          ordinary folks. When I first heard it, I felt that though it was
          impolitic for him to say what he did, it was the truth. Having been
          a "warehouse worker and machinist," your student has credibility in
          making these observations. Obama also has some street creds, albeit
          somewhat upstaged by his also being a law professor and senator. I
          hope (if he makes it to the general election) that voters don't
          punish him for this.

          Lloyd




          On Apr 12, 2008, at 6:38 PM, Mark Lewine wrote:

          > To Colleagues: Buried in my 7 class semester overload with 3 web
          > courses with nightly discussion boards to read, I get this inspired
          > message that gave me renewed faith in students, their values and
          > appreciation for our field in today's world. Enjoy, you deserve it:
          >
          > Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 10:01:05 PM EDT
          > Subject: RE: Discussion Topic for Chapt. 1: What is anthropology to
          > you?
          >
          > I have a very simple idea about the purpose of anthropology in my
          > life. I developed my philosophy while in teacher education and
          > during my
          > Cultures of Africa class. It has been further reinforced by my time
          > abroad and in the classroom teaching. As a social studies and
          > history teacher, my philosophy is that I must prepare students to
          > live in an increasingly global community. Approximately 30+ years
          > ago, students in Cleveland were battling against other schools and
          > cities in the US. Today they battle economically against other
          > countries. They are also bombarded by other cultures thanks to
          > resources such as the internet. Diversity is the modern trend and
          > those who do not adapt will be swept away. I have found that the
          > older and less educated people are incapable of understanding what
          > is going on in society. For them, the world is coming to an end
          > because "there is too much color" or "too many crazy ideas." In my
          > time as a warehouse worker and machinist, I have heard these
          > opinions expressed time and again. The sad fact is that these
          > people will remain aloof and be unable to advance in society.
          > What's worse, it is these very same men that impart such dangerous,
          > negative, and ethnocentric attitudes to the younger generation.
          > Like it or not, the younger generation is living in a time of major
          > cultural diversification. When I was a student teacher, and
          > teaching in Europe, teenagers always had questions about other
          > people. Common questions from American kids were: "Why are the
          > Chinese coming here? What's wrong in China?" or "Do you think we
          > will all be speaking Chinese in a few years?" and "Why do people
          > have different skin colors and why do races act differently?" From
          > European students, the biggest question I heard was "Why do
          > Americans smile so much and so big?" In other words, anthropology
          > is in our blood. Thanks to the internet and fantastic
          > transportation, people and ideas are traveling faster than ever
          > before. As a consequence, we have questions about foreign ideas and
          > groups we come into contact with. Historically, these contacts
          > either involved trade or war. War is quickly becoming an
          > undesirable option since the nations of the world depend on one
          > another. So, that means we can make barriers and deny ourselves the
          > benefits or we can learn and adapt. I believe that anthropology is
          > the medium by which we can study others, accept differences, and
          > adapt.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • anthropmor@AOL.COM
          In a message dated 4/13/2008 12:34:15 P.M. Central Daylight Time, lloyd.miller@mchsi.com writes: creds, albeit somewhat upstaged by his also being a law
          Message 4 of 5 , Apr 13 10:39 AM
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            In a message dated 4/13/2008 12:34:15 P.M. Central Daylight Time,
            lloyd.miller@... writes:

            creds, albeit
            somewhat upstaged by his also being a law professor and senator


            hey- he wasn't a professor- he was an adjunct!
            Mike Pavlik



            **************It's Tax Time! Get tips, forms and advice on AOL Money &
            Finance. (http://money.aol.com/tax?NCID=aolcmp00300000002850)


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • kent morris
            wonderful... ... From: Mark Lewine To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday, April 12, 2008 4:38 PM Subject: [SACC-L] shared spring air: from an anthro web
            Message 5 of 5 , Apr 17 12:52 PM
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              wonderful...
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Mark Lewine
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Saturday, April 12, 2008 4:38 PM
              Subject: [SACC-L] shared spring air: from an anthro web class


              To Colleagues: Buried in my 7 class semester overload with 3 web courses with nightly discussion boards to read, I get this inspired message that gave me renewed faith in students, their values and appreciation for our field in today's world. Enjoy, you deserve it:

              Date: Wednesday, March 26, 2008 10:01:05 PM EDT
              Subject: RE: Discussion Topic for Chapt. 1: What is anthropology to you?

              I have a very simple idea about the purpose of anthropology in my life. I developed my philosophy while in teacher education and during my
              Cultures of Africa class. It has been further reinforced by my time
              abroad and in the classroom teaching. As a social studies and history teacher, my philosophy is that I must prepare students to live in an increasingly global community. Approximately 30+ years ago, students in Cleveland were battling against other schools and cities in the US. Today they battle economically against other countries. They are also bombarded by other cultures thanks to resources such as the internet. Diversity is the modern trend and those who do not adapt will be swept away. I have found that the older and less educated people are incapable of understanding what is going on in society. For them, the world is coming to an end because "there is too much color" or "too many crazy ideas." In my time as a warehouse worker and machinist, I have heard these opinions expressed time and again. The sad fact is that these people will remain aloof and be unable to advance in society. What's worse, it is these very same men that impart such dangerous, negative, and ethnocentric attitudes to the younger generation. Like it or not, the younger generation is living in a time of major cultural diversification. When I was a student teacher, and teaching in Europe, teenagers always had questions about other people. Common questions from American kids were: "Why are the Chinese coming here? What's wrong in China?" or "Do you think we will all be speaking Chinese in a few years?" and "Why do people have different skin colors and why do races act differently?" From European students, the biggest question I heard was "Why do Americans smile so much and so big?" In other words, anthropology is in our blood. Thanks to the internet and fantastic transportation, people and ideas are traveling faster than ever before. As a consequence, we have questions about foreign ideas and groups we come into contact with. Historically, these contacts either involved trade or war. War is quickly becoming an undesirable option since the nations of the world depend on one another. So, that means we can make barriers and deny ourselves the benefits or we can learn and adapt. I believe that anthropology is the medium by which we can study others, accept differences, and adapt.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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