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  • Lloyd Miller
    ...  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 13, 2008
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      Begin forwarded message:

      > From: "Dinah Winnick" <dwinnick@...>
      > Date: February 13, 2008 12:18:34 PM CST
      > To: <jhd@...>, <laura.ogden@...>, <raalexan@...>,
      > <coffmaje@...>, <Shaka.McGlotten@...>,
      > <baptiste@...>, <paulect69@...>, <monabhan@...>,
      > <ekrause@...>, <p_doughty@...>,
      > <vitzthum@...>, <glaros@...>, <emdean@...>,
      > <smb@...>, <jherold@...>, <vediger@...>,
      > <jziker@...>, <lassiter@...>,
      > <espadola@...>, <cmiller@...>,
      > <jenny.t.chio@...>, <Lloyd.miller@...>,
      > <lmcbride@...>, <passmore@...>, <reblack@...>,
      > <suhyatt@...>, <jennselby@...>,
      > <s.m.lyon@...>, <jancius@...>, <pigg@...>,
      > <css@...>, <hubbert@...>, <fwg2@...>,
      > <vs23@...>, <hcaballe@...>, <dlrh@...>,
      > <stanlaw@...>, <petersm2@...>,
      > <Kathleen.Ragsdale@...>, <bchapin@...>,
      > <jhowell@...>, <mdiazba1@...>, "Rebecca Upton"
      > <rupton@...>
      > Subject: AN Section Columns Due Friday
      >
      > Dear Contributing Editors,
      >
      >
      >
      > This is a friendly reminder that Anthropology News columns for
      > April are due by Friday (Feb 15). I have already received columns
      > from some of you, and have sent emails to confirm receipt. If you
      > believe you have submitted your column but have not received a
      > receipt email, please resend your article.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks to all of you who spread the word about our last call for
      > papers, for the upcoming thematic issue on (im)migration. We
      > received dozens of very promising proposals and have a great set of
      > articles slated for May.
      >
      >
      >
      > We are now planning for the September issue on the anthropology
      > student experience. In Focus commentary series will address (1)
      > university-community partnerships and interactions and (2) the
      > diverse character of anthropology graduate programs. I have
      > attached the call for proposals. Although proposals are not due
      > until May 23rd, early submissions are encouraged. If you choose to
      > circulate this call on a listserv, now or in the coming months,
      > please cut and paste the text from the attachment rather than
      > forwarding the attachment itself. For the last CFP, we received
      > several comments from potential contributors who had difficulty
      > accessing the call as an attachment when posted on listservs.
      >
      >
      >
      > Please let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to
      > reading your April column soon.
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      >
      >
      > Dinah
      >
      > Call for Article Proposals: Student Experience
      >
      >
      >
      > AN is seeking contributions for an upcoming thematic issue on the
      > anthropology student experience to be published in fall 2008.
      > Students, educators and practitioners are encouraged to participate.
      >
      >
      >
      > In Focus Commentaries
      >
      > Thematic In Focus commentary series will address (1) university-
      > community partnerships and interactions and (2) the diverse
      > character of anthropology graduate programs. Articles in the first
      > series may address service learning programs, local internships and
      > research, or the ethics of “doing anthropology at home.”
      > Articles in the second series may examine the growth of new
      > interdisciplinary programs and initiatives; multi-degree, masters
      > and applied programs; the limitations or innovations within
      > existing programs; funding concerns; or navigating the system as a
      > direct versus transfer applicant. Proposals for comparative pieces
      > on anthropology education in the US and other countries and on
      > other topics related to the two central themes are also welcome.
      >
      >
      >
      > Additional Opportunities
      >
      > AN encourages proposals related to this general theme for articles
      > in other sections of AN, including Teaching Strategies (Academic
      > Affairs), Field Notes (Knowledge Exchange), independent (non-
      > series) commentaries and general news features. We welcome
      > proposals in non-traditional article formats such as photo essays,
      > infographics, op-ed cartoons, interviews and multi-authored
      > discussions. Contributors interested in coediting articles series
      > should also contact the AN Editorial Office.
      >
      >
      > To participate in this thematic issue email a 200–300 word
      > proposal and 50-75 word author bio to Anthropology News Associate
      > Managing Editor Dinah Winnick (dwinnick@...). Proposals for
      > photo essays should also include five photographs. Proposal
      > submission deadline: May 23, 2008 (early submissions encouraged).
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dinah Winnick
      >
      > Associate Managing Editor, Anthropology News
      >
      > American Anthropological Association
      >
      > 2200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 600
      >
      > Arlington, VA 22201
      >
      > 703.528.1902 ext. 3005
      >
      > dwinnick@...
      >
      >
      >



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Deborah Shepherd
      First off, I m primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit that I didn t do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in school. The
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 13, 2008
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        First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit that
        I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
        school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
        There's a comment about midway through:

        "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
        father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
        campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also going
        to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
        satisfactory solution to this problem."
        Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe, though he
        was not aware they are related."
        I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
        emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
        Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
        polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
        when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
        "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
        been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not want
        her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
        Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after Obama's
        father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
        forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist just
        didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
        Does anyone have an opinion?
        Deborah


        http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
        Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
        Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe Associated
        Press
        KOGELO, Kenya

        Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot children,
        Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from the
        New Hampshire primary.
        The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
        the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
        son.
        "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide grin.
        "But I don't want to jump just yet."
        Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a close
        second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
        "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
        setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he was
        the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the uncle
        said Wednesday.
        Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has been
        spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya after
        last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90 minutes'
        drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony to
        the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the turmoil in
        Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said Obama's
        mind.
        While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes such
        as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who have
        long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
        If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the leadership
        to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems that
        have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
        In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke to
        opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
        going into a rally in New Hampshire.
        Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
        father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
        campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also going
        to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
        satisfactory solution to this problem."
        Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe, though he
        was not aware they are related.
        Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all the
        leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell their
        supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in a
        peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
        Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
        advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of State
        Condoleezza Rice.
        He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, calling
        him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
        with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan capital,
        trying to secure an end to the violence.
        On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes not
        normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption and
        the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
        independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-election
        violence.
        "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't like
        it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
        nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The corruption
        is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have to
        look at the government ministries."
        In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
        it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
        While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a crisis
        robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for and
        deserve."
        "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause from
        university students and staff.
        Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the end
        of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
        news of their American relative's election fortunes.
        Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
        2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
        signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
        wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with shells and
        beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting for
        news of her grandson.
        Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
        university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's American
        mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya, where he
        worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in 1982.
        His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
        compound.
        The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
        father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in Kenya.
        Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
        Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here and
        shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
        highest height of achievement with just determination and hard work."
        If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
        America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.

        Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report from
        New Hampshire.


        Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material
        may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
        Copyright © 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
        Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
        Anthropology
        Anoka-Ramsey Community College
        Coon Rapids Campus
        deborah.shepherd@...
        http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
        http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
        phone number: 763-433-1195


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lloyd Miller
        Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama s father was his (Odinga s) uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since he—Odinga—is the
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 13, 2008
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          Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his (Odinga's)
          uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since
          he�Odinga�is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to call
          President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
          peace between the factions and is trying to influence his relative,
          Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
          posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
          Lloyd



          On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

          > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit
          > that
          > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
          > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
          > There's a comment about midway through:
          >
          > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
          > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
          > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
          > going
          > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
          > satisfactory solution to this problem."
          > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
          > though he
          > was not aware they are related."
          > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
          > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
          > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
          > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
          > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
          > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
          > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not
          > want
          > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
          > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after Obama's
          > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
          > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist just
          > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
          > Does anyone have an opinion?
          > Deborah
          >
          >
          > http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
          > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
          > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
          > Associated
          > Press
          > KOGELO, Kenya
          >
          > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
          > children,
          > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from the
          > New Hampshire primary.
          > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
          > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
          > son.
          > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide
          > grin.
          > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
          > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a close
          > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
          > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
          > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he was
          > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the uncle
          > said Wednesday.
          > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has been
          > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya
          > after
          > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90 minutes'
          > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony to
          > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
          > turmoil in
          > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said Obama's
          > mind.
          > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes such
          > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who
          > have
          > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
          > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
          > leadership
          > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems
          > that
          > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
          > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke to
          > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
          > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
          > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
          > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
          > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
          > going
          > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
          > satisfactory solution to this problem."
          > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
          > though he
          > was not aware they are related.
          > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all the
          > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell their
          > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in a
          > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
          > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
          > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of State
          > Condoleezza Rice.
          > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu, calling
          > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
          > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan
          > capital,
          > trying to secure an end to the violence.
          > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes
          > not
          > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption
          > and
          > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
          > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-
          > election
          > violence.
          > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't like
          > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
          > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
          > corruption
          > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have to
          > look at the government ministries."
          > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
          > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
          > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a
          > crisis
          > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for and
          > deserve."
          > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause from
          > university students and staff.
          > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the end
          > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
          > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
          > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
          > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
          > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
          > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
          > shells and
          > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting
          > for
          > news of her grandson.
          > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
          > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's
          > American
          > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya,
          > where he
          > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in 1982.
          > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
          > compound.
          > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
          > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in Kenya.
          > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
          > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here and
          > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
          > highest height of achievement with just determination and hard work."
          > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
          > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
          >
          > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report from
          > New Hampshire.
          >
          > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
          > material
          > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
          > Copyright � 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
          > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
          > Anthropology
          > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
          > Coon Rapids Campus
          > deborah.shepherd@...
          > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
          > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
          > phone number: 763-433-1195
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Deborah Shepherd
          OK, I ll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of adding Gibbs said Odinga and Obama s father are from the same tribe, though he was not aware they
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 14, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            OK, I'll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of adding
            "Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe, though he
            was not aware they are related." was confusing. She made it sound like
            it really mattered! And her use of pronouns was sloppy (one of my
            pet-peeves). The "his" in the statement, "Obama's father was his uncle"
            should refer back to the subject of the clause, not of the previous
            clause. Harumph.

            >>> Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...> 2/14/2008 12:10 AM >>>
            Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his (Odinga's)
            uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since
            he—Odinga—is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to call

            President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
            peace between the factions and is trying to influence his relative,
            Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
            posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
            Lloyd



            On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

            > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit

            > that
            > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
            > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
            > There's a comment about midway through:
            >
            > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
            > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
            > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
            > going
            > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
            > satisfactory solution to this problem."
            > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
            > though he
            > was not aware they are related."
            > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
            > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
            > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
            > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
            > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
            > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
            > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not

            > want
            > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
            > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after
            Obama's
            > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
            > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist
            just
            > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
            > Does anyone have an opinion?
            > Deborah
            >
            >
            > http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
            > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
            > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
            > Associated
            > Press
            > KOGELO, Kenya
            >
            > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
            > children,
            > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from
            the
            > New Hampshire primary.
            > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
            > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
            > son.
            > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide
            > grin.
            > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
            > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a
            close
            > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
            > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
            > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he
            was
            > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the
            uncle
            > said Wednesday.
            > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has
            been
            > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya
            > after
            > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90
            minutes'
            > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony
            to
            > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
            > turmoil in
            > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said
            Obama's
            > mind.
            > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes
            such
            > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who

            > have
            > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
            > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
            > leadership
            > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems
            > that
            > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
            > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke
            to
            > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
            > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
            > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
            > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
            > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
            > going
            > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
            > satisfactory solution to this problem."
            > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
            > though he
            > was not aware they are related.
            > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all
            the
            > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell
            their
            > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in
            a
            > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
            > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
            > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of
            State
            > Condoleezza Rice.
            > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu,
            calling
            > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
            > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan
            > capital,
            > trying to secure an end to the violence.
            > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes

            > not
            > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption

            > and
            > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
            > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-
            > election
            > violence.
            > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't
            like
            > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
            > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
            > corruption
            > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have
            to
            > look at the government ministries."
            > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
            > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
            > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a
            > crisis
            > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for
            and
            > deserve."
            > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause
            from
            > university students and staff.
            > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the
            end
            > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
            > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
            > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
            > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
            > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
            > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
            > shells and
            > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting

            > for
            > news of her grandson.
            > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
            > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's
            > American
            > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya,
            > where he
            > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in
            1982.
            > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
            > compound.
            > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
            > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in
            Kenya.
            > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
            > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here
            and
            > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
            > highest height of achievement with just determination and hard
            work."
            > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
            > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
            >
            > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report
            from
            > New Hampshire.
            >
            > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
            > material
            > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
            > Copyright © 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
            > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
            > Anthropology
            > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
            > Coon Rapids Campus
            > deborah.shepherd@...
            > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
            > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
            > phone number: 763-433-1195
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/
            Yahoo! Groups Links





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Johnson, Ellen C. K.
            Refer back is redundant, to get technical. Re- means back. ________________________________ From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com]
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 14, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              "Refer back" is redundant, to get technical. "Re-" means "back."



              ________________________________

              From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
              Of Deborah Shepherd
              Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 12:37 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Interesting article and a question about
              Luo(Kenya) culture



              OK, I'll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of adding
              "Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe, though he
              was not aware they are related." was confusing. She made it sound like
              it really mattered! And her use of pronouns was sloppy (one of my
              pet-peeves). The "his" in the statement, "Obama's father was his uncle"
              should refer back to the subject of the clause, not of the previous
              clause. Harumph.

              >>> Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...
              <mailto:lloyd.miller%40mchsi.com> > 2/14/2008 12:10 AM >>>
              Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his (Odinga's)
              uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since
              he-Odinga-is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to call

              President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
              peace between the factions and is trying to influence his relative,
              Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
              posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
              Lloyd

              On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

              > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit

              > that
              > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
              > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
              > There's a comment about midway through:
              >
              > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
              > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
              > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
              > going
              > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
              > satisfactory solution to this problem."
              > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
              > though he
              > was not aware they are related."
              > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
              > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
              > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
              > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
              > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
              > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
              > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not

              > want
              > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
              > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after
              Obama's
              > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
              > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist
              just
              > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
              > Does anyone have an opinion?
              > Deborah
              >
              >
              > http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
              <http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2>
              > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
              > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
              > Associated
              > Press
              > KOGELO, Kenya
              >
              > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
              > children,
              > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from
              the
              > New Hampshire primary.
              > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
              > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
              > son.
              > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide
              > grin.
              > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
              > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a
              close
              > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
              > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
              > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he
              was
              > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the
              uncle
              > said Wednesday.
              > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has
              been
              > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya
              > after
              > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90
              minutes'
              > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony
              to
              > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
              > turmoil in
              > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said
              Obama's
              > mind.
              > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes
              such
              > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who

              > have
              > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
              > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
              > leadership
              > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems
              > that
              > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
              > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke
              to
              > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
              > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
              > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
              > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
              > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
              > going
              > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
              > satisfactory solution to this problem."
              > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
              > though he
              > was not aware they are related.
              > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all
              the
              > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell
              their
              > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in
              a
              > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
              > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
              > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of
              State
              > Condoleezza Rice.
              > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu,
              calling
              > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
              > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan
              > capital,
              > trying to secure an end to the violence.
              > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes

              > not
              > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption

              > and
              > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
              > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-
              > election
              > violence.
              > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't
              like
              > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
              > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
              > corruption
              > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have
              to
              > look at the government ministries."
              > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
              > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
              > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a
              > crisis
              > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for
              and
              > deserve."
              > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause
              from
              > university students and staff.
              > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the
              end
              > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
              > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
              > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
              > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
              > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
              > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
              > shells and
              > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting

              > for
              > news of her grandson.
              > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
              > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's
              > American
              > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya,
              > where he
              > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in
              1982.
              > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
              > compound.
              > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
              > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in
              Kenya.
              > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
              > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here
              and
              > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
              > highest height of achievement with just determination and hard
              work."
              > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
              > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
              >
              > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report
              from
              > New Hampshire.
              >
              > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
              > material
              > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
              > Copyright (c) 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
              > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
              > Anthropology
              > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
              > Coon Rapids Campus
              > deborah.shepherd@...
              <mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>
              > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
              <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/>
              > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc>
              > phone number: 763-433-1195
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/
              <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/>
              Yahoo! Groups Links

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Deborah Shepherd
              Well, at least it isn t ambiguous! Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D. Anthropology Anoka-Ramsey Community College Coon Rapids Campus deborah.shepherd@anokaramsey.edu
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 14, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Well, at least it isn't ambiguous!

                Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
                Anthropology
                Anoka-Ramsey Community College
                Coon Rapids Campus
                deborah.shepherd@...
                http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
                http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
                phone number: 763-433-1195


                >>> "Johnson, Ellen C. K." <Johnson@...> 2/14/2008 12:39 PM >>>

                "Refer back" is redundant, to get technical. "Re-" means "back."

                ________________________________

                From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                Of Deborah Shepherd
                Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 12:37 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Interesting article and a question about
                Luo(Kenya) culture

                OK, I'll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of adding
                "Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe, though he
                was not aware they are related." was confusing. She made it sound like
                it really mattered! And her use of pronouns was sloppy (one of my
                pet-peeves). The "his" in the statement, "Obama's father was his uncle"
                should refer back to the subject of the clause, not of the previous
                clause. Harumph.

                >>> Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...
                <mailto:lloyd.miller%40mchsi.com> > 2/14/2008 12:10 AM >>>
                Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his (Odinga's)
                uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since
                he-Odinga-is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to call

                President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
                peace between the factions and is trying to influence his relative,
                Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
                posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
                Lloyd

                On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:

                > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit

                > that
                > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
                > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
                > There's a comment about midway through:
                >
                > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
                > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
                > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
                > going
                > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
                > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                > though he
                > was not aware they are related."
                > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
                > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
                > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
                > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
                > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
                > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
                > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not

                > want
                > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
                > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after
                Obama's
                > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
                > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist
                just
                > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
                > Does anyone have an opinion?
                > Deborah
                >
                >
                > http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
                <http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2>
                > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
                > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
                > Associated
                > Press
                > KOGELO, Kenya
                >
                > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
                > children,
                > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from
                the
                > New Hampshire primary.
                > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
                > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
                > son.
                > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide
                > grin.
                > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
                > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a
                close
                > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
                > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
                > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he
                was
                > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the
                uncle
                > said Wednesday.
                > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has
                been
                > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya
                > after
                > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90
                minutes'
                > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony
                to
                > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
                > turmoil in
                > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said
                Obama's
                > mind.
                > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes
                such
                > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who

                > have
                > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
                > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
                > leadership
                > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems
                > that
                > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
                > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke
                to
                > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
                > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
                > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
                > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
                > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
                > going
                > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
                > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                > though he
                > was not aware they are related.
                > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all
                the
                > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell
                their
                > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in
                a
                > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
                > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
                > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of
                State
                > Condoleezza Rice.
                > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu,
                calling
                > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
                > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan
                > capital,
                > trying to secure an end to the violence.
                > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes

                > not
                > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption

                > and
                > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
                > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-
                > election
                > violence.
                > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't
                like
                > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
                > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
                > corruption
                > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have
                to
                > look at the government ministries."
                > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
                > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
                > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a
                > crisis
                > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for
                and
                > deserve."
                > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause
                from
                > university students and staff.
                > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the
                end
                > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
                > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
                > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
                > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
                > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
                > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
                > shells and
                > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting

                > for
                > news of her grandson.
                > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
                > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's
                > American
                > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya,
                > where he
                > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in
                1982.
                > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
                > compound.
                > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
                > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in
                Kenya.
                > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
                > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here
                and
                > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
                > highest height of achievement with just determination and hard
                work."
                > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
                > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
                >
                > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report
                from
                > New Hampshire.
                >
                > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
                > material
                > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
                > Copyright (c) 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
                > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
                > Anthropology
                > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
                > Coon Rapids Campus
                > deborah.shepherd@...
                <mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>
                > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
                <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/>
                > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc>
                > phone number: 763-433-1195
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/
                <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/>
                Yahoo! Groups Links

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Lloyd Miller
                Technically you are right, Ellen, but you d have to retrace the etymological line to Latin to get to that meaning. Many if not most people would likely
                Message 7 of 8 , Feb 14, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Technically you are right, Ellen, but you'd have to "retrace" the
                  etymological line to Latin to get to that meaning. Many if not most
                  people would likely follow Deborah's usage because we use "refer" in
                  the more general sense of "to allude to," etc. You'd be about as
                  successful opposing this tide as you would trying to prevent people
                  (including college professors and journalists) from splitting
                  infinitives. I think we're simply the victims of Sapir's "language
                  drift."

                  Hang in there, though. After you retire, these kinds of
                  technicalities will gently roll off your back without causing
                  stress. After nearly 8 years, I'm even learning to boldly go and
                  accept split infinitives!

                  Lloyd



                  On Feb 14, 2008, at 12:39 PM, Johnson, Ellen C. K. wrote:

                  > "Refer back" is redundant, to get technical. "Re-" means "back."
                  >
                  > ________________________________
                  >
                  > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                  > Of Deborah Shepherd
                  > Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 12:37 PM
                  > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Interesting article and a question about
                  > Luo(Kenya) culture
                  >
                  > OK, I'll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of adding
                  > "Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                  > though he
                  > was not aware they are related." was confusing. She made it sound like
                  > it really mattered! And her use of pronouns was sloppy (one of my
                  > pet-peeves). The "his" in the statement, "Obama's father was his
                  > uncle"
                  > should refer back to the subject of the clause, not of the previous
                  > clause. Harumph.
                  >
                  > >>> Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...
                  > <mailto:lloyd.miller%40mchsi.com> > 2/14/2008 12:10 AM >>>
                  > Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his (Odinga's)
                  > uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign (since
                  > he-Odinga-is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to call
                  >
                  > President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
                  > peace between the factions and is trying to influence his relative,
                  > Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
                  > posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
                  > Lloyd
                  >
                  > On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:
                  >
                  > > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to admit
                  >
                  > > that
                  > > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I was in
                  > > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship ties.
                  > > There's a comment about midway through:
                  > >
                  > > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
                  > > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
                  > > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
                  > > going
                  > > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
                  > > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                  > > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                  > > though he
                  > > was not aware they are related."
                  > > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any strong
                  > > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo family.
                  > > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and accepts
                  > > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural areas,
                  > > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is possible to
                  > > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once she has
                  > > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family will not
                  >
                  > > want
                  > > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
                  > > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that after
                  > Obama's
                  > > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle stepped
                  > > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The journalist
                  > just
                  > > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
                  > > Does anyone have an opinion?
                  > > Deborah
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
                  > <http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2>
                  > > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in Kenya
                  > > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
                  > > Associated
                  > > Press
                  > > KOGELO, Kenya
                  > >
                  > > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
                  > > children,
                  > > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results from
                  > the
                  > > New Hampshire primary.
                  > > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard news on
                  > > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's favorite
                  > > son.
                  > > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a wide
                  > > grin.
                  > > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
                  > > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama finishing a
                  > close
                  > > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
                  > > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much of a
                  > > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and if he
                  > was
                  > > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then," the
                  > uncle
                  > > said Wednesday.
                  > > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father, has
                  > been
                  > > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in Kenya
                  > > after
                  > > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90
                  > minutes'
                  > > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear testimony
                  > to
                  > > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
                  > > turmoil in
                  > > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on Said
                  > Obama's
                  > > mind.
                  > > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other tribes
                  > such
                  > > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai Kibaki, who
                  >
                  > > have
                  > > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
                  > > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
                  > > leadership
                  > > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the problems
                  > > that
                  > > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
                  > > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator spoke
                  > to
                  > > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday before
                  > > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
                  > > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that Obama's
                  > > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst of his
                  > > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is also
                  > > going
                  > > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a negotiated,
                  > > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                  > > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                  > > though he
                  > > was not aware they are related.
                  > > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that "all
                  > the
                  > > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election tell
                  > their
                  > > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and resolve in
                  > a
                  > > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
                  > > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department, his
                  > > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary of
                  > State
                  > > Condoleezza Rice.
                  > > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond Tutu,
                  > calling
                  > > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite interviews
                  > > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the Kenyan
                  > > capital,
                  > > trying to secure an end to the violence.
                  > > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on themes
                  >
                  > > not
                  > > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level corruption
                  >
                  > > and
                  > > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its 1963
                  > > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the post-
                  > > election
                  > > violence.
                  > > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government didn't
                  > like
                  > > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was televised
                  > > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
                  > > corruption
                  > > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you just have
                  > to
                  > > look at the government ministries."
                  > > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new problem;
                  > > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human problem. ...
                  > > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it is a
                  > > crisis
                  > > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have fought for
                  > and
                  > > deserve."
                  > > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to applause
                  > from
                  > > university students and staff.
                  > > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at the
                  > end
                  > > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees, listened for
                  > > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
                  > > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of Obama's
                  > > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls, alongside a
                  > > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein Obama,
                  > > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
                  > > shells and
                  > > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room, waiting
                  >
                  > > for
                  > > news of her grandson.
                  > > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to a
                  > > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the candidate's
                  > > American
                  > > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to Kenya,
                  > > where he
                  > > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash in
                  > 1982.
                  > > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the family
                  > > compound.
                  > > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not know his
                  > > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement in
                  > Kenya.
                  > > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006 visit.
                  > > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope here
                  > and
                  > > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to the
                  > > highest height of achievement with just determination and hard
                  > work."
                  > > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between Africa and
                  > > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
                  > >
                  > > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this report
                  > from
                  > > New Hampshire.
                  > >
                  > > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This
                  > > material
                  > > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
                  > > Copyright (c) 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
                  > > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
                  > > Anthropology
                  > > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
                  > > Coon Rapids Campus
                  > > deborah.shepherd@...
                  > <mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>
                  > > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
                  > <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/>
                  > > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc>
                  > > phone number: 763-433-1195
                  > >
                  > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > Find out more at our web page :http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/
                  > <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc/>
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                  >



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • George Thomas
                  Journalism has indeed gone the way of the split infinitive, having drifted that direction long ago. The Associated Press guide to usage provides the Star Trek
                  Message 8 of 8 , Feb 15, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Journalism has indeed gone the way of the split infinitive, having drifted that direction long ago. The Associated Press guide to usage provides the Star Trek example ("To boldly go..." it must be the universal example du every jour), and explains that in many cases splitting the infinitive (1) flows better and (2) is actually more understandable.
                    Some, chiefly academics who write often and who correct papers regularly, become exercised over this, and choose boldly to go forth to champion excruciatingly correct grammar.
                    I fall between the camps, choosing the diplomatic route.
                    The original example appeared to illustrate a case of obscured/disrupted meaning, by which what was meant was not clearly conveyed. That's usually a more serious problem. It depends on what the meaning of "his" is.
                    G


                    Re: Interesting article and a question about Luo(Kenya) culture
                    Posted by: "Lloyd Miller" lloyd.miller@...
                    Date: Thu Feb 14, 2008 11:08 am ((PST))

                    Technically you are right, Ellen, but you'd have to "retrace" the
                    etymological line to Latin to get to that meaning. Many if not most
                    people would likely follow Deborah's usage because we use "refer" in
                    the more general sense of "to allude to," etc. You'd be about as
                    successful opposing this tide as you would trying to prevent people
                    (including college professors and journalists) from splitting
                    infinitives. I think we're simply the victims of Sapir's "language
                    drift."

                    Hang in there, though. After you retire, these kinds of
                    technicalities will gently roll off your back without causing
                    stress. After nearly 8 years, I'm even learning to boldly go and
                    accept split infinitives!

                    Lloyd



                    On Feb 14, 2008, at 12:39 PM, Johnson, Ellen C. K. wrote:

                    > "Refer back" is redundant, to get technical. "Re-" means "back."
                    >
                    > ________________________________
                    >
                    > From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On
                    Behalf
                    > Of Deborah Shepherd
                    > Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 12:37 PM
                    > To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Interesting article and a question about
                    > Luo(Kenya) culture
                    >
                    > OK, I'll agree. The fact that the journalist made a point of
                    adding
                    > "Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                    > though he
                    > was not aware they are related." was confusing. She made it sound
                    like
                    > it really mattered! And her use of pronouns was sloppy (one of my
                    > pet-peeves). The "his" in the statement, "Obama's father was his
                    > uncle"
                    > should refer back to the subject of the clause, not of the
                    previous
                    > clause. Harumph.
                    >
                    > >>> Lloyd Miller <lloyd.miller@...
                    > <mailto:lloyd.miller%40mchsi.com> > 2/14/2008 12:10 AM
                    >>>
                    > Deborah, I think Odinga meant that Obama's father was his
                    (Odinga's)
                    > uncle, and that Obama called him (Odinga) during the campaign
                    (since
                    > he-Odinga-is the opposition leader) and that Obama plans also to
                    call
                    >
                    > President Kibaki. In other words, Obama is trying to negotiate a
                    > peace between the factions and is trying to influence his
                    relative,
                    > Odinga. Judging from the NYT op ed piece that Ann Popplestone
                    > posted, I think it'll be an uphill battle.
                    > Lloyd
                    >
                    > On Feb 13, 2008, at 4:32 PM, Deborah Shepherd wrote:
                    >
                    > > First off, I'm primarily an archaeologist and am the first to
                    admit
                    >
                    > > that
                    > > I didn't do all the cultural anthro study I could have when I
                    was
                    in
                    > > school. The following article talks about Obama's Luo kinship
                    ties.
                    > > There's a comment about midway through:
                    > >
                    > > "Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that
                    Obama's
                    > > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst
                    of
                    his
                    > > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is
                    also
                    > > going
                    > > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a
                    negotiated,
                    > > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                    > > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                    > > though he
                    > > was not aware they are related."
                    > > I've checked an ethnography on the Luo and couldn't find any
                    strong
                    > > emphasis on the mother's-brother relationship in the Luo
                    family.
                    > > Basically, the traditional culture practices bridewealth and
                    accepts
                    > > polygyny. Husbands have strong authority over wives. In rural
                    areas,
                    > > when a woman refuses to accept a marriage offer, it is
                    possible to
                    > > "ambush" one's desired wife, even against her will, and once
                    she
                    has
                    > > been in the possession of the man's family, her own family
                    will not
                    >
                    > > want
                    > > her back. They will only want the bridewealth payment.
                    > > Nevertheless, I understand Odinga's comment to mean that
                    after
                    > Obama's
                    > > father showed little inclination to raise his son, the uncle
                    stepped
                    > > forward to be a moral influence in the boy's life. The
                    journalist
                    > just
                    > > didn't understand the African metaphorical way of speaking.
                    > > Does anyone have an opinion?
                    > > Deborah
                    > >
                    > >
                    > >
                    http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2
                    >
                    <" target=_blank>http://abcnews.go.com/International/WireStory?id=4102638&page=2>
                    > > Obama Family in Kenya Watches US VoteBarack Obama's Family in
                    Kenya
                    > > Watches New Hampshire Vote, Expresses PrideBy KATY POWNALLThe
                    > > Associated
                    > > Press
                    > > KOGELO, Kenya
                    > >
                    > > Sitting in plastic chairs surrounded by chickens and barefoot
                    > > children,
                    > > Barack Obama's Kenyan relatives rejoiced in the early results
                    from
                    > the
                    > > New Hampshire primary.
                    > > The candidate's uncle was pleased but cautious when he heard
                    news
                    on
                    > > the radio of the initial encouraging signs for the family's
                    favorite
                    > > son.
                    > > "Ah, that's wonderful," Said Obama declared, breaking into a
                    wide
                    > > grin.
                    > > "But I don't want to jump just yet."
                    > > Even after the results in New Hampshire showed Obama
                    finishing a
                    > close
                    > > second to Hillary Clinton, Said Obama remained optimistic.
                    > > "He still stands a good chance. I don't think it's too much
                    of a
                    > > setback because there was a time he was trailing Hillary and
                    if he
                    > was
                    > > the kind of man who gives up, he would have given up then,"
                    the
                    > uncle
                    > > said Wednesday.
                    > > Kogelo, the western Kenyan village of Barack Obama's father,
                    has
                    > been
                    > > spared the political and ethnic violence that has erupted in
                    Kenya
                    > > after
                    > > last month's disputed presidential election. But it's just 90
                    > minutes'
                    > > drive from a town where torched and looted buildings bear
                    testimony
                    > to
                    > > the clashes that have left more than 500 people dead, and the
                    > > turmoil in
                    > > Kenya, as well as his nephew's political success, were on
                    Said
                    > Obama's
                    > > mind.
                    > > While the dispute is political, violence has pitted other
                    tribes
                    > such
                    > > as the Obamas' Luo against the Kikuyu of President Mwai
                    Kibaki, who
                    >
                    > > have
                    > > long dominated politics and the economy in Kenya.
                    > > If Barack Obama were in Kenya today, he would "work with the
                    > > leadership
                    > > to bring them to a round table and find a solution to the
                    problems
                    > > that
                    > > have been ravaging the country," his uncle said.
                    > > In fact, Obama's spokesman Robert Gibbs confirmed the senator
                    spoke
                    > to
                    > > opposition leader Raila Odinga for about five minutes Monday
                    before
                    > > going into a rally in New Hampshire.
                    > > Odinga, a Luo, told British Broadcasting Corp. radio that
                    Obama's
                    > > father was his uncle, and that Obama called him "in the midst
                    of
                    his
                    > > campaigning ... to express his concern and to say that he is
                    also
                    > > going
                    > > to call President Kibaki so that Kibaki agrees to find a
                    negotiated,
                    > > satisfactory solution to this problem."
                    > > Gibbs said Odinga and Obama's father are from the same tribe,
                    > > though he
                    > > was not aware they are related.
                    > > Obama, speaking Tuesday in New Hampshire, said he urged that
                    "all
                    > the
                    > > leaders there, regardless of their position on the election
                    tell
                    > their
                    > > supporters to stand down, to desist with the violence and
                    resolve
                    in
                    > a
                    > > peaceful way in accordance with Kenyan law."
                    > > Obama was coordinating his efforts with the State Department,
                    his
                    > > advisers said, and has discussed the situation with Secretary
                    of
                    > State
                    > > Condoleezza Rice.
                    > > He has also spoken with South African Archbishop Desmond
                    Tutu,
                    > calling
                    > > him during last week's Iowa caucuses in between satellite
                    interviews
                    > > with local Iowa stations. Tutu has been in Nairobi, the
                    Kenyan
                    > > capital,
                    > > trying to secure an end to the violence.
                    > > On his last visit to Kenya, in August 2006, Obama touched on
                    themes
                    >
                    > > not
                    > > normally debated openly here, criticizing the high-level
                    corruption
                    >
                    > > and
                    > > the tribal politics that have dominated the country since its
                    1963
                    > > independence from Britain. Both have played a role in the
                    post-
                    > > election
                    > > violence.
                    > > "Very many people sat up and listened, but the government
                    didn't
                    > like
                    > > it," Said Obama said of his nephew's speech, which was
                    televised
                    > > nationwide. "It touched a nerve they didn't want touched. The
                    > > corruption
                    > > is endemic here and tribalism cannot escape your eyes you
                    just have
                    > to
                    > > look at the government ministries."
                    > > In his speech, Barack Obama said: "Corruption is not a new
                    problem;
                    > > it's not just a Kenyan or African problem. It's a human
                    problem.
                    ...
                    > > While corruption is a problem we all share, here in Kenya it
                    is a
                    > > crisis
                    > > robbing an honest people of the opportunities they have
                    fought for
                    > and
                    > > deserve."
                    > > "Ethnic-based tribal politics have to stop," he said, to
                    applause
                    > from
                    > > university students and staff.
                    > > Obama's relatives, gathered Tuesday in the family compound at
                    the
                    > end
                    > > of a dusty dirt road lined with mimosa and mango trees,
                    listened
                    for
                    > > news of their American relative's election fortunes.
                    > > Inside his grandmother's cinderblock home, framed photos of
                    Obama's
                    > > 2006 visit and an earlier one in 1987 lined the walls,
                    alongside a
                    > > signed election poster from his Senate race. Sarah Hussein
                    Obama,
                    > > wearing a brightly patterned dress and sandals decorated with
                    > > shells and
                    > > beads, sat in a wooden chair in the immaculate living room,
                    waiting
                    >
                    > > for
                    > > news of her grandson.
                    > > Obama's father, also named Barack Obama, won a scholarship to
                    a
                    > > university in Hawaii, where he met and married the
                    candidate's
                    > > American
                    > > mother. The two separated and Obama's father returned to
                    Kenya,
                    > > where he
                    > > worked as a government economist until he died in a car crash
                    in
                    > 1982.
                    > > His white-tiled grave is located in a secluded corner of the
                    family
                    > > compound.
                    > > The younger Obama was mostly raised in Hawaii and did not
                    know his
                    > > father well, but his presidential bid has sparked excitement
                    in
                    > Kenya.
                    > > Thousands were drawn to his appearances during his 2006
                    visit.
                    > > Said Obama said his nephew "has proved to be a beacon of hope
                    here
                    > and
                    > > shown that even in difficult circumstances you can make it to
                    the
                    > > highest height of achievement with just determination and
                    hard
                    > work."
                    > > If Obama is elected, he would improve relations between
                    Africa and
                    > > America because he had his roots in Africa, his uncle said.
                    > >
                    > > Associated Press writer Nedra Pickler contributed to this
                    report
                    > from
                    > > New Hampshire.
                    > >
                    > > Copyright 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
                    This
                    > > material
                    > > may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.
                    > > Copyright (c) 2008 ABC News Internet Ventures
                    > > Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
                    > > Anthropology
                    > > Anoka-Ramsey Community College
                    > > Coon Rapids Campus
                    > > deborah.shepherd@...
                    > <mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu>
                    > > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
                    > <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/>
                    > > http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
                    <http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc>
                    > > phone number: 763-433-1195
                    > >



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