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Re: [SACC-L] Digest Number 1541

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  • Linda France Stine LFSTINE
    Hey all! I have had the fortune of using volunteers on some of my excavations that also had paid experienced staff and fieldschool students. First, volunteers
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 14, 2008
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      Hey all!

      I have had the fortune of using volunteers on some of my excavations that
      also had paid experienced staff and fieldschool students. First,
      volunteers on site mean that everything takes longer, but that is fine.
      Second, volunteers do need to sign some sort of waiver that your school
      lawyer ok's. At UNCG they had me keep a list at the site that essentially
      made the volunteers members of the class for insurance purposes. (The
      school covered them if volunteers signed the list.) I talked to everyone
      about dangers like tripping over strings (also fines for shovels flipped
      the wrong way etc.). I let volunteers self-sort as to what they felt they
      could do. I always have them spread around to work with students as it is
      a great social learning experience for all of them as well as
      archaeological. I do not allow kids under 12 unless accompanied by a
      responsible adult.

      Archaeology fieldschool is not just digging as you all well know. I think
      if an older adult attends for credit she or he should be able to show they
      understand the basics. If they can not shovel they should at least
      understand why we shovel shave. Hopefully, if they do have physical
      problems, and many do not, they will discover an innovative way to trowel.
      Usually you can set up water or dry screening for folks that are disabled
      or not physically able to do heavy manual labor. Heck, I can't do the
      same kind of heavy labor I used to anymore!

      My best workers at a site in Florida were 67, 73 and 75 year old women and
      one 12 year old boy. Two of the woman could not dig physically but they
      sure could pick a screen and carry a bucket. Most volunteers love picking
      screens. Keeps them part of the fieldwork and not just in the lab.
      Labwork is great too.

      Hey Bob M- how is your anthro club coming along?

      LFS

      Dr. Linda France Stine, RPA
      Department of Anthropology
      436 Graham, UNCG 27412
      (336)-256-1098 lfstine@...



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      [SACC-L] Digest Number 1541








      A news and discussion forum for members and friends of the Society for
      Anthropology in Community Colleges.

      Messages In This Digest (19 Messages)
      1a.
      Archaeology in Community Colleges From: mattierasberry0226
      1b.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges From: Wenzel, Jason
      1c.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges From: Lloyd Miller
      1d.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges From: Deborah Shepherd
      1e.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges From: kent morris
      1f.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges From: Mark Lewine
      2a.
      A New Effort to Give Creationism the Appearance of Scientific Credib From:
      bdlqvcc
      2b.
      Re: A New Effort to Give Creationism the Appearance of Scientific Cr From:
      Laura Gonzalez
      3a.
      Re: New file uploaded to SACC-L From: Johnson, Ellen C. K.
      4.
      Fwd: AN Section News Due 1/15 From: Lloyd Miller
      5a.
      New file uploaded to SACC-L From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      6a.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges/Volunteer Problem From:
      anthropmor@...
      6b.
      Volunteers on Digs? From: Deborah Shepherd
      6c.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs? From: Wenzel, Jason
      6d.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs? From: anthropmor@...
      6e.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs? From: Deborah Shepherd
      6f.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs? From: anthropmor@...
      7.
      seniors and archaeology field schools From: Bob Muckle
      8.
      Abstract deadline extended! From: rls@...
      View All Topics | Create New Topic
      Messages
      1a.
      Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "mattierasberry0226" mattierasberry0226@...
      mattierasberry0226
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 5:41 am (PST)
      Hello everyone,
      I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?

      Mattie Rasberry
      Craven Community College
      New Bern, NC

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      1b.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "Wenzel, Jason" wenzelj@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:20 am (PST)
      Hi Mattie,

      As an archaeologist in Florida, I can tell you that we have a tremendous
      amount of senior citizens that get involved with our projects. The Florida
      Anthropological Society and its chapters also reflect this in the
      membership demography. For some reason digs tend to draw in alot of these
      folks on one end, and then alot of younger people on the other end (under
      30). A director of a museum in Ft. Myers (a major retirement/snowbird
      community) mentioned how she had over 80 senior citizens volunteering at
      her site one time!

      Most of the senior citizens I have worked with are very inspiring-some are
      in their 80's but have a tremendous capacity in their abilities in the
      field. I can tell you first hand-there are quite a few that we have to
      watch and make sure they are taking breaks, getting water, not
      overlifting, etc. just because they have so much enthusiam and passion in
      archaeology, often times working 8 hours a day (at their own request!)

      But to get back to your issue, if you have concerns about their health, I
      would definitely make sure you clearly state your expectations and
      concerns and inquire if they have any specific health problems or physical
      limitations. If they do end up working on a dig of course make sure you
      adequately prepared with first aid supplies, water and make sure they have
      proper attire, gloves, good shoes, etc of course. The weather and terrain
      (hills, etc.) are also important to consider.

      But what about having them do labwork? Since archaeologists usually end up
      doing 3-5 hours of lab work for each hour of field work, perhaps this is
      an area you can have them involved in. In the field you could also have
      the seniors managing your FS catalogs, doing paper & notes (very important
      anyway!), taking photographs, looking through the screens, etc. while the
      "younger" college students actually are digging, troweling, lifting
      buckets, shaking screens.

      But you may be surprised on some of the things your senior students may be
      able to do. I can understand your concern though about the risks. In my
      experience however, I find that if they are not fit for the task, for the
      most part they will not do the work and vice versa.

      As a side note, one thing I like seeing in the field is the generation gap
      being bridged between my younger college students and some of the senior
      volunteers. Since my work is primarily historical (with alot of 20th
      Century artifacts), I see alot of the seniors sharing stories and wisdom
      related to their lives (or their parents, etc.) that puts the cultural
      material we find in context.

      Jason

      Hello everyone,
      I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?

      Mattie Rasberry
      Craven Community College
      New Bern, NC

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      1c.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "Lloyd Miller" lloyd.miller@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 6:31 am (PST)
      Mattie,

      I think it's wonderful that you got such public interest in the
      course for reasons other than just earning credit.

      A quick and easy solution might be to offer those who are not
      seeking credit audit status (if your college permits this option).
      That way they can participate in the course however they want and
      avoid whatever requirements they can't or don't want to do. Their
      transcripts would show audit status rather than a letter grade. I
      agree with you that those who do want credit should be held to the
      same standards of evaluation as the traditional credit-seekers.

      Be careful not to underestimate the seniors (I are one). Many of us
      are not as frail as we look. If your fieldwork requirements are too
      physically taxing for some, you can make special accommodations on an
      individual basis without lowering your standards, just as you would
      (be legally required to) do for people with disabilities.

      Good luck!

      Lloyd Miller
      (emeritus, Des Moines Area Community College; Editor, Teaching
      Anthropology: SACC Notes)

      On Jan 11, 2008, at 7:40 AM, mattierasberry0226 wrote:

      > Hello everyone,
      > I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      > teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      > This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      > the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      > problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      > of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      > by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      > field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      > community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      > remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      > don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      > want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      > for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      > work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?
      >
      > Mattie Rasberry
      > Craven Community College
      > New Bern, NC
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      1d.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "Deborah Shepherd" deborah.shepherd@...
      deborah_j_shepherd
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 11:25 am (PST)
      Years ago, I helped on a dig in Germany that took Earthwatch volunteers.
      Many were seniors as old as their 70s, but they managed, even with a trip
      to a foreign country and living in our not-so-posh "house." Your best bet
      is to explain the situation to everyone in the class (maybe show them a
      fieldwork video so they have a better idea what the conditions are) and
      ask each of them (seniors or not) to be candid with you about their
      physical ability to participate. Ask them if they have any restrictions
      placed on them by their doctors concerning amount of weight lifted, etc.
      Those with legitimate restrictions, or who encounter problems in the
      field, can be relegated to tasks better suited to their constraints. Just
      make it a point that such "special treatment" is only given for physical
      issues and is not an invitation to students to pick their preferred tasks
      and avoid others. You'll have to depend on their honesty, in some cases.

      What precautions does your school take? Does the school ask students to
      sign liability wavers? Is medical information collected? Is an emergency
      contact kept on file? If you are out in the field and an emergency arises,
      do you have information about medical conditions and drugs taken? If the
      school doesn't collect this information because of privacy laws, perhaps
      you can ask students, who are willing, to volunteer such information. Then
      it is up to them.

      Whatever you do, you should probably treat all the students the same. It
      is conceivable that a younger student may have serious physical issues,
      too.

      Deb

      >>> "mattierasberry0226" <mattierasberry0226@...> 1/11/2008 7:40 AM
      >>>

      Hello everyone,
      I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?

      Mattie Rasberry
      Craven Community College
      New Bern, NC




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      1e.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "kent morris" km52@... ke19nt52
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 7:55 pm (PST)
      just treat them all like human beings...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: mattierasberry0226
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 5:40 AM
      Subject: [SACC-L] Archaeology in Community Colleges

      Hello everyone,
      I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?

      Mattie Rasberry
      Craven Community College
      New Bern, NC

      __________ NOD32 2340 (20070620) Information __________

      This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
      http://www.eset.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      1f.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges
      Posted by: "Mark Lewine" mlewine@... krameniwel
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:25 pm (PST)
      Mattie:
      Having a legal release form is critical and each college has many such
      forms for various kinds of field activities. I would be glad to share our
      form if wanted. As far as categories of field participants goes, over the
      past twenty years, we have often had different kinds of participants
      working on different tasks, sometimes on different days. The field
      director needs to keep in mind both the core research question and the
      public educational purposes in mind. We even had a day for families to
      participate lightly in both field and labwork, with the supervision
      keeping in mind who was participating at what level. In my Center, I
      supervise the educational process purposes and they have several levels of
      participation involved while my partner supervises the research content
      focus. At the end of each day, week, month and semester, we discuss and
      support one another's work. My view for each group working on a site is
      governed first by the level of the group and the planned focus for their
      participation: credit/non-credit or mixed; college/high school or mixed;
      citizen volunteers, trained or untrained or mixed. After we determine what
      kind of group it is, we always have a trained supervisor for each group
      and plan specially for the mix if necessary...I float and pay particular
      attention to the talent development of each group as I have always
      insisted on a meritocracy on site...right now we have a 20 year old
      supervising everyone except myself, Beth and Al: our professional
      archaeologists because she has been with us since her sophomore year of
      high school and is highly skilled and trained.
      Bob Muckle, Ann Kaupp and others: this is a great thread to continue at
      the SACC meeting...I suggest Bob run a roundtable to continue this
      discussion! Mattie, come to the SACC mtg and participate! We can spread
      the network with this discussion.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Lloyd Miller
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 9:31 AM
      Subject: Re: [SACC-L] Archaeology in Community Colleges

      Mattie,

      I think it's wonderful that you got such public interest in the
      course for reasons other than just earning credit.

      A quick and easy solution might be to offer those who are not
      seeking credit audit status (if your college permits this option).
      That way they can participate in the course however they want and
      avoid whatever requirements they can't or don't want to do. Their
      transcripts would show audit status rather than a letter grade. I
      agree with you that those who do want credit should be held to the
      same standards of evaluation as the traditional credit-seekers.

      Be careful not to underestimate the seniors (I are one). Many of us
      are not as frail as we look. If your fieldwork requirements are too
      physically taxing for some, you can make special accommodations on an
      individual basis without lowering your standards, just as you would
      (be legally required to) do for people with disabilities.

      Good luck!

      Lloyd Miller
      (emeritus, Des Moines Area Community College; Editor, Teaching
      Anthropology: SACC Notes)

      On Jan 11, 2008, at 7:40 AM, mattierasberry0226 wrote:

      > Hello everyone,
      > I'm somewhat new to this group--and am only in my second semester of
      > teaching. I have a bit of a dilemma that I'd love some feedback on.
      > This semster I am teaching Archaeology Methods and theory (A term) in
      > the classroom, and an Archaeological Field school (b-term). The
      > problem that has arisen now that I've met my students is that 13 of 17
      > of them are elderly, frail senior citizens who are simply fascinated
      > by the subject matter. The college ran a feature story about the
      > field research in the Sunday paper prior to registration to generate
      > community interest and bring in more students--it worked. The
      > remaining 4 are traditional students in college transfer programs. I
      > don't want implement a double standard but at the same time, I don't
      > want to ailenate the older students nor do I want to lower standards
      > for college transfer students either.(Pertaining mostly to the field
      > work portion.) How you would handle this type of situation?
      >
      > Mattie Rasberry
      > Craven Community College
      > New Bern, NC
      >
      >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      2a.
      A New Effort to Give Creationism the Appearance of Scientific Credib
      Posted by: "bdlqvcc" blynch@... bdlqvcc
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:46 am (PST)

      Here is yet another effort to put a scientific face on biblical
      creationism. It reminds me of the Saturday Night Live skit where "Clark
      Kent' puts on his famous black-rimmed glasses and is immediately
      recognizable as himself, then takes them off and is immediately
      recognizable as Superman, and on and on.... "Clark?!" "Superman!?'
      'Clark?'....

      So creationism now puts on the dark rimmed glasses of 'the scientist.'
      I wonder if anyone will ever notice that behind those 'peer reviewed'
      glasses of the mild-mannered 'scientist' is really 'Creationism' in
      disguise, ready to leap evolution in a single bound?

      A new 'peer reviewed journal of creationism!
      <http://www.answersingenesis.org/arj/call-for-papers>

      Brian

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      Messages in this topic (2)
      2b.
      Re: A New Effort to Give Creationism the Appearance of Scientific Cr
      Posted by: "Laura Gonzalez" ltgonzalez@... lauratgonzalez
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 3:24 pm (PST)
      Brian,

      This is really frightening. Any idea how they are going to pass this off
      as
      a "peer reviewed" publication? I guess only their peers are invited.

      Laura

      -----Original Message-----
      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
      bdlqvcc
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 8:46 AM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SACC-L] A New Effort to Give Creationism the Appearance of
      Scientific Crediblity

      Here is yet another effort to put a scientific face on biblical
      creationism. It reminds me of the Saturday Night Live skit where "Clark
      Kent' puts on his famous black-rimmed glasses and is immediately
      recognizable as himself, then takes them off and is immediately
      recognizable as Superman, and on and on.... "Clark?!" "Superman!?'
      'Clark?'....

      So creationism now puts on the dark rimmed glasses of 'the scientist.'
      I wonder if anyone will ever notice that behind those 'peer reviewed'
      glasses of the mild-mannered 'scientist' is really 'Creationism' in
      disguise, ready to leap evolution in a single bound?

      A new 'peer reviewed journal of creationism!
      <http://www.answersi <http://www.answersingenesis.org/arj/call-for-papers>
      ngenesis.org/arj/call-for-papers>

      Brian

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (2)
      3a.
      Re: New file uploaded to SACC-L
      Posted by: "Johnson, Ellen C. K." Johnson@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:08 am (PST)
      Here is a fuller job description. Applications are to be in by the end
      of January.

      Ellen Johnson

      From: Staeck, John
      Sent: Friday, January 11, 2008 11:06 AM
      To: Johnson, Ellen C. K.
      Subject: job ad

      Attachments: 2007 Job ad clean.doc

      Ellen, attached and again below, in-text, are copies of the biological
      job ad. We would like all applications in without exception by the end
      of this month. Best - John

      Raise the Standard

      When you teach at College of DuPage you are part of a dedicated team of
      educators serving over 26,000 students. College of DuPage is where you
      can provide direction for students' lives as you direct your own
      successful career. We seek a full-time, tenure-track Biological
      Anthropologist to join our program beginning in the Fall of 2008.

      ANTHROPOLOGY FACULTY

      The successful candidate will be a dynamic biological anthropologist
      firmly rooted in the four-field perspective with a commitment to
      excellence in teaching. Responsibilities include further developing the
      anthropology curriculum and interdisciplinary connections at the
      college, including in relation to programs in Criminal Justice and the
      Health Sciences. Furthermore, this candidate must be engaged in the
      field and will join an active department that is a national leader in
      community college anthropology. The usual teaching load is five courses
      per semester and faculty in anthropology are expected to teach both in
      their primary area of interest as well as courses in Introduction to
      Anthropology and Cultural Anthropology. Additional duties include
      advising students, curriculum development and committee work.
      Opportunities exist to teach a flexible schedule that may include
      teaching assignments days, evenings and weekends.

      Requires a Master's degree in Anthropology or a closely-related
      discipline and demonstrated commitment to excellence in teaching at the
      college level. A Ph.D. is preferred. Starting salaries are dependent on
      education and experience but normally range from $44,000 - $61,800 for a
      two semester academic year. College of DuPage also offers a generous
      benefits plan.

      To receive an application write to Human Resources at College of DuPage,
      Human Resources, Faculty Recruiting, 425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL
      60137. Only complete application packets will be given full
      consideration by the search committee.

      You may also submit your application, cover letter and resume on-line by
      visiting our website at www.cod.edu/gen_info/hum_res
      <http://www.cod.edu/gen_info/hum_res> . If you apply on-line, you must
      mail photocopies of your transcripts separately to complete your
      application materials.

      We are an equal opportunity employer committed to diversity.

      COLLEGE OF DUPAGE

      John P. Staeck, Ph.D.

      Interim Associate Dean, Social Sciences

      Health, Social, and Behavioral Sciences Division

      College of DuPage

      425 Fawell Blvd.

      Glen Ellyn, IL 60137-6599

      (630) 942-2344

      staeck@...

      ________________________________

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com]
      Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2008 8:07 AM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SACC-L] New file uploaded to SACC-L

      Hello,

      This email message is a notification to let you know that
      a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the SACC-L
      group.

      File : /Syllabi/Laura's Syllabi/FA07 102 TTh Syllabus.doc
      Uploaded by : lauratgonzalez <ltgonzalez@...
      <mailto:ltgonzalez%40cox.net> >
      Description : ANTH 102: Intro to Physical Anthropology (3 units)

      You can access this file at the URL:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SACC-L/files/Syllabi/Laura%27s%20Syllabi/F
      A07%20102%20TTh%20Syllabus.doc
      <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SACC-L/files/Syllabi/Laura%27s%20Syllabi/
      FA07%20102%20TTh%20Syllabus.doc>

      To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
      http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.htmlf
      iles
      <http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
      files>

      Regards,

      lauratgonzalez <ltgonzalez@... <mailto:ltgonzalez%40cox.net> >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      4.
      Fwd: AN Section News Due 1/15
      Posted by: "Lloyd Miller" lloyd.miller@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:14 am (PST)
      Hey SACCers,

      Our March column is due next Tuesday, Jan 15. What should it be?
      Please let me know in time to submit. I'm forwarding AN Editor Dinah
      Winnick's message soliciting contributions for the May theme issue in
      case any of you would like to respond. I've pasted the Call for
      Papers below.

      Lloyd

      Begin forwarded message:

      > From: "Dinah Winnick" <dwinnick@...>
      > Date: January 11, 2008 10:26:10 AM CST
      > To: <FRothstein@...>, <laura.ogden@...>,
      > <raalexan@...>, <coffmaje@...>, <ejc@...>,
      > <baptiste@...>, <paulect69@...>, <monabhan@...>,
      > <ekrause@...>, <p_doughty@...>,
      > <vitzthum@...>, <glaros@...>, <emdean@...>,
      > <smb@...>, <jherold@...>, <vediger@...>,
      > <jziker@...>, <lassiter@...>,
      > <espadola@...>, <cmiller@...>,
      > <jenny.t.chio@...>, <Lloyd.miller@...>,
      > <lmcbride@...>, <passmore@...>, <reblack@...>,
      > <suhyatt@...>, <jselby@...>, <s.m.lyon@...>,
      > <jancius@...>, <pigg@...>, <css@...>,
      > <hubbert@...>, <fwg2@...>, <vs23@...>,
      > <hcaballe@...>, <dlrh@...>, <stanlaw@...>,
      > <petersm2@...>, <Kathleen.Ragsdale@...>,
      > <bchapin@...>, <jhowell@...>, <mdiazba1@...>
      > Subject: AN Section News Due 1/15
      >
      > Dear Contributing Editors,
      >
      >
      >
      > This is a friendly reminder that Anthropology News columns for
      > March are due by Tuesday, January 15. Welcome to those of you who
      > are new editors beginning this month. I look forward to working
      > with you! I have already received columns from a couple of you, for
      > which I have confirmed receipt. If you believe you have submitted
      > your column but have not received a receipt email, please try
      > resending your article.
      >
      >
      >
      > Please note that we are currently accepting article proposals for
      > one upcoming thematic issues (May), and we encourage you to spread
      > the word within your sections, as well as submit author
      > recommendations if you would like. All proposals should be 2
      > paragraphs long (approx. ½ page, single spaced) and sent directly
      > to me at dwinnick@.... Photo essay proposals are also welcome.
      >
      >
      >
      > Theme: Migration, Immigration, Emigration
      >
      > This call for papers is attached, and can also be found in the Dec
      > and Jan issues of AN. Subtopics include: Contemporary Public
      > Policy, Global Flows, and Conceptualizing Borders. Proposal
      > deadlines run throughout January. Selected contributors will be
      > notified late January/early February and content will be due in
      > early March for this May issue.
      >
      >
      >
      > Please let me know if you have any questions. I look forward to
      > receiving all of your columns by Tuesday (at the latest).
      >
      >
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      >
      >
      > Best regards,
      > Dinah
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Dinah Winnick
      >
      > Associate Managing Editor, Anthropology News
      >
      > American Anthropological Association
      >
      > 2200 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 600
      >
      > Arlington, VA 22201
      >
      > 703.528.1902 ext. 3005
      >
      > dwinnick@...
      >
      > Call for Papers
      >
      >
      > Migration, Immigration, and Emigration
      >
      > CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC POLICY
      > Deadline: January 14, 2008
      >
      > What can anthropology contribute to the understanding and design of
      > public policy on (im)migration? How have different governments
      > responded to (im)migrants and public concerns regarding (im)
      > migration? How are (im)migrants and transnational communities
      > affected by public policy and policy discourse? How do different
      > authorities at municipal, state, national, and international levels
      > conceive of public domains of care and the provision of public
      > services? How are notions of race employed in (im)migration policy
      > discourse?
      >
      >
      > GLOBAL FLOWS
      > Deadline: January 21, 2008
      >
      > The transnational movement of people and capital is a popular theme
      > among contemporary social scientists examining international
      > development, seasonal migration, and various other topics. In what
      > ways has population movement impacted or inspired the kind of work
      > anthropologists do and how anthropologists conceive of their
      > subjects? How have anthropologists examined flows of information,
      > raw materials, food, medicine, power, and capital alongside
      > population flows? How have indigeneity, locality, citizenship, and
      > nationality been articulated within and alongside discourses of
      > global flows?
      >
      > How are historic human migratory patterns discussed in the
      > different subfields of anthropology? How have scientific
      > innovations (e.g. genetics research technologies) affected the ways
      > in which anthropologists examine and understand historic migration?
      >
      >
      > CONCEPTUALIZING BORDERS
      > Deadline: January 28, 2008
      >
      > Borders and boundaries provide a rich but challenging site for
      > anthropological research. How do anthropologists engage with
      > contested notions of social and geographic borders/boundaries? How
      > has work on migration affected anthropological methods and the ways
      > in which scope and scale are articulated in ethnography? How do
      > individuals and social groups re-imagine their identities in
      > temporary and permanent situations of forced migration, refuge, and
      > asylum?
      >
      >
      > Email a two paragraph article proposal, complete news article
      > (600-800 words) or commentary (800-1400 words) to Anthropology News
      > Associate Managing Editor Dinah Winnick, dwinnick@....
      > Proposals for photo essays are also welcome.
      ?

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      5a.
      New file uploaded to SACC-L
      Posted by: "SACC-L@yahoogroups.com" SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 9:46 am (PST)

      Hello,

      This email message is a notification to let you know that
      a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the SACC-L
      group.

      File : /Syllabi/Syllabus Mike Pavlik.rtf
      Uploaded by : lauratgonzalez <ltgonzalez@...>
      Description : Anthropology Syllabus from Mike Pavlik

      You can access this file at the URL:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SACC-L/files/Syllabi/Syllabus%20Mike%20Pavlik.rtf


      To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
      http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.htmlfiles


      Regards,

      lauratgonzalez <ltgonzalez@...>


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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6a.
      Re: Archaeology in Community Colleges/Volunteer Problem
      Posted by: "anthropmor@..." anthropmor@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:26 pm (PST)

      In a message dated 1/11/08 1:25:37 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      deborah.shepherd@... writes:

      Years ago, I helped on a dig in Germany that took Earthwatch volunteers.
      Many were seniors as old as their 70s, but they managed, even with a trip
      to a
      foreign country and living in our not-so-posh "house." Your best bet is to

      explain the

      Not to completely change this, but am I the only one getting tired of
      seeing
      volunteers doing our jobs?
      Are we undermining ourselves? I am starting to think so.
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6b.
      Volunteers on Digs?
      Posted by: "Deborah Shepherd" deborah.shepherd@...
      deborah_j_shepherd
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:31 pm (PST)
      At the time (in 1979), taking 3 shifts of Earthwatch volunteers earned
      this particular dig $50,000 in research funding. The dig would not have
      happened otherwise.

      Personally, I'm in favor of volunteers whenever possible. They are eager
      and hard-working. They also learn a great deal and teach their friends and
      family. How else is the general public going to learn that archaeology is
      not treasure hunting? They won't learn it from the History Channel.

      Deborah

      >>> <anthropmor@...> 1/11/2008 2:26 PM >>>


      In a message dated 1/11/08 1:25:37 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      deborah.shepherd@... writes:

      Years ago, I helped on a dig in Germany that took Earthwatch volunteers.
      Many were seniors as old as their 70s, but they managed, even with a trip
      to a
      foreign country and living in our not-so-posh "house." Your best bet is to

      explain the

      Not to completely change this, but am I the only one getting tired of
      seeing
      volunteers doing our jobs?
      Are we undermining ourselves? I am starting to think so.
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6c.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs?
      Posted by: "Wenzel, Jason" wenzelj@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 12:55 pm (PST)
      I agree Deborah! I have a few dedicated volunteers that really help me out
      alot in the field. When we go into doing test units (phase II) I put an
      experienced volunteer in charge of a couple new students. If it is a less
      experienced volunteer, I assign them screen duty with somebody who is
      trained. My college provided me with a work study intern this semester but
      most of her time is spent managing the field specimen catalog and labeling
      and collecting bags. I keep very busy as well managing the whole
      operation. Overall so much more can be done with *good* volunteers in the
      field. I like making my project accessible to members in the community as
      well.

      Jason Wenzel
      Valencia Community College
      Brevard Community College
      Florida

      ________________________________

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com on behalf of Deborah Shepherd
      Sent: Fri 1/11/2008 3:30 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [SACC-L] Volunteers on Digs?

      At the time (in 1979), taking 3 shifts of Earthwatch volunteers earned
      this particular dig $50,000 in research funding. The dig would not have
      happened otherwise.

      Personally, I'm in favor of volunteers whenever possible. They are eager
      and hard-working. They also learn a great deal and teach their friends and
      family. How else is the general public going to learn that archaeology is
      not treasure hunting? They won't learn it from the History Channel.

      Deborah

      >>> <anthropmor@... <mailto:anthropmor%40AOL.COM> > 1/11/2008 2:26 PM
      >>>

      In a message dated 1/11/08 1:25:37 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      deborah.shepherd@... <
      mailto:deborah.shepherd%40anokaramsey.edu> writes:

      Years ago, I helped on a dig in Germany that took Earthwatch volunteers.
      Many were seniors as old as their 70s, but they managed, even with a trip
      to a
      foreign country and living in our not-so-posh "house." Your best bet is to

      explain the

      Not to completely change this, but am I the only one getting tired of
      seeing
      volunteers doing our jobs?
      Are we undermining ourselves? I am starting to think so.
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489 <
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489>

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6d.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs?
      Posted by: "anthropmor@..." anthropmor@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:20 pm (PST)

      In a message dated 1/11/08 2:55:43 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      wenzelj@... writes:

      Overall so much more can be done with *good* volunteers in the field. I
      like
      making my project accessible to members in the community as well.

      I did not say we shouldn't make the project accessible...and I did not say

      they should be completely done away with. However, you are missing the
      point... did you think you might be training pot hunters?
      Moreover, with an increasing amount of the profession bein g supported by
      CRM businesses,is it not counter productive to use volunteers?
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6e.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs?
      Posted by: "Deborah Shepherd" deborah.shepherd@...
      deborah_j_shepherd
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:33 pm (PST)
      It's possible that a pot hunter or two might be trained, but to tell the
      sincere public that they aren't good enough to participate with "real"
      archaeologists (when just about every other type of scientific fieldwork
      takes volunteers) in order to avoid the small possibility of contributing
      to a negative activity is just self-destructive. We need public awareness
      and support, and we can never eliminate pot hunters. Also, when actual pot
      hunters go on digs, a suitable number of reports come back to us from
      those who have chosen to reform their ways, having finally learned about
      the importance of provenience. Sure, there are no statistics on any of
      this, but I feel I am less cynical, for better or for worse, on this
      subject than you.

      Pot hunters who are in it for the income will probably not need our help
      to locate archaeological sites.

      Or if you are worried about taking volunteers on a specific site, thinking
      that one of them may use their knowledge of the site artifact finds and
      location to rob the site when you aren't looking--in that case, then don't
      take volunteers. Most sites (at least the ones I work on) don't produce
      artifacts of black market value.

      Deborah

      Deborah J. Shepherd, Ph.D.
      Anthropology
      Anoka-Ramsey Community College
      Coon Rapids Campus
      deborah.shepherd@...
      http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/shepherd/
      http://webs.anokaramsey.edu/sacc
      phone number: 763-433-1195


      >>> <anthropmor@...> 1/11/2008 3:19 PM >>>


      In a message dated 1/11/08 2:55:43 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      wenzelj@... writes:

      Overall so much more can be done with *good* volunteers in the field. I
      like
      making my project accessible to members in the community as well.

      I did not say we shouldn't make the project accessible...and I did not say

      they should be completely done away with. However, you are missing the
      point... did you think you might be training pot hunters?
      Moreover, with an increasing amount of the profession bein g supported by
      CRM businesses,is it not counter productive to use volunteers?
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      6f.
      Re: Volunteers on Digs?
      Posted by: "anthropmor@..." anthropmor@...
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:48 pm (PST)

      In a message dated 1/11/08 3:34:15 P.M. Central Standard Time,
      deborah.shepherd@... writes:

      but to tell the sincere public that they aren't good enough to participate

      with "real" archaeologists (when just about every other type of scientific

      fieldwork takes volunteers)

      I did not say that...and in fact, made sure to say I did not want
      volunteers
      completely shut out.
      I am saying that CRM is becoming increasingly important; and supports a
      good
      chunk of the profession.
      I am also not the one who specified "good" volunteers versus volunteers -
      or the "sincere" public .
      And volunteers as opposed to students is an interesting question as to
      your
      other statement.
      The point I am making is that I am concerned about the future and present
      of anthro....and I worry that some practices are being given a "happy
      face"
      pass.
      Mike Pavlik

      **************Start the year off right. Easy ways to stay in shape.
      http://body.aol.com/fitness/winter-exercise?NCID=aolcmp00300000002489

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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      Messages in this topic (6)
      7.
      seniors and archaeology field schools
      Posted by: "Bob Muckle" bmuckle@... canadianarchaeologist
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:41 pm (PST)
      I've had a couple of close calls with a couple of my mature students (but
      not really seniors) over the years on my annual archaeology field school.
      One lost her footing while surveying on an embankment and fell into a
      river (she lived, but was very, very wet). One week into another field
      season, one student announces she has a bad back and can't lift the
      buckets or screen or backfill, or generally do anything she didn't feel
      like. The other students, the more able ones, didn't really like the fact
      that the one with the bad back didn't have to do any of the grunt work. It
      created some tension.

      Now...I do have a requirement of physical fitness. I also have them sign
      waivers. I take them on a long hike (about 20 km) through the study area
      on the second official day of the field school. If they can handle that,
      they can handle the rest.

      Bob Muckle

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      Messages in this topic (1)
      8.
      Abstract deadline extended!
      Posted by: "rls@..." rls@... glaosheimr
      Fri Jan 11, 2008 8:12 pm (PST)
      A couple of you have requested an extension on the deadline for abstracts
      for the 2008 SACC meeting in DC, so I am officially extending the deadline
      to Monday, January 14th. So get working this weekend!

      --Becky

      Here's the official Call for Papers:

      The Society for Anthropology in Community Colleges (SACC) is holding its
      2008 annual meeting in Washington, DC, March 14-18, 2008. The theme of the
      meeting is "Sharing Knowledge: Anthropology's Contributions to
      Understanding
      Human Bio-Cultural Diversity."

      Proposals for paper presentations on any topic relating to anthropology
      are
      welcome. Of particular interest are presentations on teaching
      anthropology,
      research in cultural and biological anthropology, and programs developed
      to
      reach the wider community.

      Paper presentations are tentatively scheduled for 15 minutes. Abstracts
      should be no longer than 125 words and must be received no later than
      January 11, 2008. Make sure to include your institutional affiliation and
      contact information with your abstract.

      The abstracts, along with AV equipment needs, should be sent to Rebecca
      Stein, preferably via email at steinrl@... <mailto:steinrl%40lavc.edu
      >
      . In written form, mail to Rebecca Stein, Department of Anthropology, Los
      Angeles Valley College, 5800 Fulton Avenue, Valley Glen, California,
      91401.

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