Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Fwd: RE: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary

Expand Messages
  • Linda Light
    The creator of the Faces of Culture series of videos, Coastline CC in Huntington Beach (CA), is finishing a new series of 35 half-hour videos to be used for
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 7, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      The creator of the "Faces of Culture" series of videos, Coastline CC in Huntington Beach (CA), is finishing a new series of 35 half-hour videos to be used for biological, cultural, and 4-field courses. The biological set is based on Jurmain's 10th ed Intro to Phyusical Anthro, and includes one on the chapter "An Overview of the Primates" as well as one on "Primate Behavior." They will be available in the fall 2008 (so they say!) They've been delayed pastu the original target date of sprint 2008. I've only seen cultural ones, but if the bio ones are comparable, they should be terrific.
      Linda Light


      ----- Original Message ----
      From: Lori Barkley <lbarkley@...>
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Sunday, January 6, 2008 10:10:12 AM
      Subject: Fwd: RE: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary

      I asked our resident primatologist (unfortunately teaching in Adult Basic Ed as the anth program is so small) & here is his response.

      >>> Brad McVittie 03/01/2008 9:14 am >>>

      Hi Lori:
      That's a tough one. One hour for all of the primates? I am not completely up-to-date with recent primate videos, and it is unclear whether or not the requester is looking for a survey video (probably) or something that compares human -non-human primate behaviour (probablya better option).
      The one below is a good general introduction with nice camera work. (It does talk about the tree shrew, however, as probably being the sister taxon to primates ... but hey, the flying lemur idea is still pretty new.

      I couldn't remember the name so I used PIN to look it up (http://library. primate.wisc. edu/av/avsearch. php)

      VT0182 Survey of the Primates

      Produced by Duane M. Rumbaugh, Austin H. Riesen, and Robert E. Lee; Georgia State University College of Arts and Sciences in cooperation with the San Diego Zoological Society [VHS; col., sd.; 38 min.: 1988]

      Primates are defined by 10 criteria: generalized skeleton; highly mobile digits (and often an opposable thumb); tactile pads on the fingers; abbrevation of snout or muzzle (excepting the baboon); perfection of binocular vision; smell and other senses de-emphasized by sight; fewer teeth; increase in size and complexity of brain cortex; nourishment of fetus before birth; upright posture or bipedalism; and prolongation of infant dependency upon parents. The Primate order is broken up into several groups: TREE SHREWS (Tupaiidae) -- not a true primate species, but considered the link between insectivores and primates. Shown is the Common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) PROSIMIANS -- Shown are the ruffed lemur (Lemur variegatus or Varecia black lemur (Lemur macaco); red ruffed lemur (Lemur variegatus or Varecia variegtaus); ring-tailed lemur (Lemur catta) with close-up of hands, shown eating and grooming; Galago or lesser bushbaby (Galago senegalensis) and Mindanao
      tarsier or Phillipine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta) with close-up of hands. NEW WORLD MONKEYS -- Shown are the long-haired spider monkey (Ateles belzebuth); Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii); golden marmoset or lion tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) seen climbing and with a close-up of its hands; Humboldt's woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) seen eating leaves and using its prehensile tail; squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus) at play, scratching and carrying infants; hooded capuchin or tufted capuchin (Cebus apella); howler (Alouatta villosa) seen eating; Night monkey or owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) and red uakari (Cacajao calvis rubicundus). LESSER APES -- Shown are the siamang (Syndactylus symphalangus) seen brachiating, walking upright, and parenting; white-cheeked gibbon (Hylobates concolor leucogenys). GREAT APES -- Shown are the orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus); chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) ; gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) seen displaying with hand clapping
      and chest beating, and eating. OLD WORLD MONKEYS -- Shown are the douc langur (Pygathrix nemeaus) seen eating and parenting; Hanuman langur (Presbytis entellus) seen grooming; Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus); Kikuyu colobus or western black-and-white colobus (Colobus polykomos); Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvana); hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas) seen eating; gelada baboon (Theropithecus gelada); patas monkey (Erythrocebus patas); talapoin (Cercopithecus talapoin); Moustached guenon (Cercopithecus cephus) seen eating; roloway guenon or diana monkey (Cercopithecus diana); golden-bellied mangabey or agile mangabey (Cercocebus galeritus) showing open mouth threat; Allen's baboon-like monkey or Allen's swamp monkey (Allenopithecus nigroviridis) seen stuffing cheek pouches with food; mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) seen walking on all fours; yellow baboon (Papio cynocephalus) seen eating meat, and showing teeth when yawning; pig-tailed macaque (Macaca
      nemestrina) seen parenting; rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) seen foraging on ground; and snow monkey or Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata) showing facial expression. Also seen but not decsribed are the de Brazza's monkey (Cercopithecus neglectus) and the Sulawesi crested macaque (Macaca nigra).

      Brad McVittie
      Instructor,
      School of Adult Basic Education,
      Selkirk College,
      365-7292 ext. 474

      >>> Lori Barkley 02/01/2008 10:28 am >>>
      In case you have ideas--I'll be watching to see what comes for suggestions. The list-serve is for College Instructors of Anth, so there is usually some pretty good discussion generated by these questions.

      >>> "Johnson, Ellen C. K." <Johnson@cdnet. cod.edu> 02/01/2008 9:13 am >>>

      You might check the University of Wisconsin web site for primates.
      (suggestion from John Staeck, College of DuPage)

      Ellen Johnson, COD

      ____________ _________ _________ __

      From: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com ) [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com )] On Behalf
      Of Wenzel, Jason
      Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 12:08 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com )
      Subject: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary

      Hi,

      First of all, Happy New Year to everybody!

      I am interested in requesting my library purchase a primatology related
      documentary that I can show in my Introductory Anthropology course. I am
      currently using the Haviland, et. al Essence of Anthropology text. I am
      looking for something that is up-to-date, comprehensive, interesting, at
      about an hour's length and suitable for an introductory class.

      I would greatly appreciate any suggestions.

      Thanks,

      Jason

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      ____________________________________________________________________________________
      Be a better friend, newshound, and
      know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now. http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Pam Ford
      I still like the very old Life in the Trees episode from David Attenborough s Life on Earth series. I have to borrow it (VHS) every semester from my
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 8, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        I still like the very old "Life in the Trees" episode from David
        Attenborough's "Life on Earth" series. I have to borrow it (VHS) every
        semester from my public library but the animals are all in the wild (or
        look like they are!) and the number of species is not overwhelming.



        I look forward to seeing the new ones that Linda just described.



        ~Pam Ford



        ________________________________

        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
        Of Linda Light
        Sent: Monday, January 07, 2008 8:20 AM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: Fwd: RE: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary



        The creator of the "Faces of Culture" series of videos, Coastline CC in
        Huntington Beach (CA), is finishing a new series of 35 half-hour videos
        to be used for biological, cultural, and 4-field courses. The biological
        set is based on Jurmain's 10th ed Intro to Phyusical Anthro, and
        includes one on the chapter "An Overview of the Primates" as well as one
        on "Primate Behavior." They will be available in the fall 2008 (so they
        say!) They've been delayed pastu the original target date of sprint
        2008. I've only seen cultural ones, but if the bio ones are comparable,
        they should be terrific.
        Linda Light

        ----- Original Message ----
        From: Lori Barkley <lbarkley@... <mailto:lbarkley%40selkirk.ca> >
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com <mailto:SACC-L%40yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Sunday, January 6, 2008 10:10:12 AM
        Subject: Fwd: RE: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary

        I asked our resident primatologist (unfortunately teaching in Adult
        Basic Ed as the anth program is so small) & here is his response.

        >>> Brad McVittie 03/01/2008 9:14 am >>>

        Hi Lori:
        That's a tough one. One hour for all of the primates? I am not
        completely up-to-date with recent primate videos, and it is unclear
        whether or not the requester is looking for a survey video (probably) or
        something that compares human -non-human primate behaviour (probablya
        better option).
        The one below is a good general introduction with nice camera work. (It
        does talk about the tree shrew, however, as probably being the sister
        taxon to primates ... but hey, the flying lemur idea is still pretty
        new.

        I couldn't remember the name so I used PIN to look it up
        (http://library. primate.wisc. edu/av/avsearch. php)

        VT0182 Survey of the Primates

        Produced by Duane M. Rumbaugh, Austin H. Riesen, and Robert E. Lee;
        Georgia State University College of Arts and Sciences in cooperation
        with the San Diego Zoological Society [VHS; col., sd.; 38 min.: 1988]

        Primates are defined by 10 criteria: generalized skeleton; highly mobile
        digits (and often an opposable thumb); tactile pads on the fingers;
        abbrevation of snout or muzzle (excepting the baboon); perfection of
        binocular vision; smell and other senses de-emphasized by sight; fewer
        teeth; increase in size and complexity of brain cortex; nourishment of
        fetus before birth; upright posture or bipedalism; and prolongation of
        infant dependency upon parents. The Primate order is broken up into
        several groups: TREE SHREWS (Tupaiidae) -- not a true primate species,
        but considered the link between insectivores and primates. Shown is the
        Common tree shrew (Tupaia glis) PROSIMIANS -- Shown are the ruffed lemur
        (Lemur variegatus or Varecia black lemur (Lemur macaco); red ruffed
        lemur (Lemur variegatus or Varecia variegtaus); ring-tailed lemur (Lemur
        catta) with close-up of hands, shown eating and grooming; Galago or
        lesser bushbaby (Galago senegalensis) and Mindanao
        tarsier or Phillipine tarsier (Tarsius syrichta) with close-up of hands.
        NEW WORLD MONKEYS -- Shown are the long-haired spider monkey (Ateles
        belzebuth); Goeldi's monkey (Callimico goeldii); golden marmoset or lion
        tamarin (Leontopithecus rosalia) seen climbing and with a close-up of
        its hands; Humboldt's woolly monkey (Lagothrix lagotricha) seen eating
        leaves and using its prehensile tail; squirrel monkey (Saimiri sciureus)
        at play, scratching and carrying infants; hooded capuchin or tufted
        capuchin (Cebus apella); howler (Alouatta villosa) seen eating; Night
        monkey or owl monkey (Aotus trivirgatus) and red uakari (Cacajao calvis
        rubicundus). LESSER APES -- Shown are the siamang (Syndactylus
        symphalangus) seen brachiating, walking upright, and parenting;
        white-cheeked gibbon (Hylobates concolor leucogenys). GREAT APES --
        Shown are the orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus); chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) ;
        gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) seen displaying with hand clapping
        and chest beating, and eating. OLD WORLD MONKEYS -- Shown are the douc
        langur (Pygathrix nemeaus) seen eating and parenting; Hanuman langur
        (Presbytis entellus) seen grooming; Proboscis monkey (Nasalis larvatus);
        Kikuyu colobus or western black-and-white colobus (Colobus polykomos);
        Barbary macaque (Macaca sylvana); hamadryas baboon (Papio hamadryas)
        seen eating; gelada baboon (Theropithecus gelada); patas monkey
        (Erythrocebus patas); talapoin (Cercopithecus talapoin); Moustached
        guenon (Cercopithecus cephus) seen eating; roloway guenon or diana
        monkey (Cercopithecus diana); golden-bellied mangabey or agile mangabey
        (Cercocebus galeritus) showing open mouth threat; Allen's baboon-like
        monkey or Allen's swamp monkey (Allenopithecus nigroviridis) seen
        stuffing cheek pouches with food; mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) seen
        walking on all fours; yellow baboon (Papio cynocephalus) seen eating
        meat, and showing teeth when yawning; pig-tailed macaque (Macaca
        nemestrina) seen parenting; rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) seen
        foraging on ground; and snow monkey or Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata)
        showing facial expression. Also seen but not decsribed are the de
        Brazza's monkey (Cercopithecus neglectus) and the Sulawesi crested
        macaque (Macaca nigra).

        Brad McVittie
        Instructor,
        School of Adult Basic Education,
        Selkirk College,
        365-7292 ext. 474

        >>> Lori Barkley 02/01/2008 10:28 am >>>
        In case you have ideas--I'll be watching to see what comes for
        suggestions. The list-serve is for College Instructors of Anth, so there
        is usually some pretty good discussion generated by these questions.

        >>> "Johnson, Ellen C. K." <Johnson@cdnet. cod.edu> 02/01/2008 9:13 am
        >>>

        You might check the University of Wisconsin web site for primates.
        (suggestion from John Staeck, College of DuPage)

        Ellen Johnson, COD

        ____________ _________ _________ __

        From: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com )
        [mailto:SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com )] On
        Behalf
        Of Wenzel, Jason
        Sent: Tuesday, January 01, 2008 12:08 PM
        To: SACC-L@yahoogroups. com( mailto:SACC- L%40yahoogroups. com )
        Subject: [SACC-L] Please Suggest a Primatology Documentary

        Hi,

        First of all, Happy New Year to everybody!

        I am interested in requesting my library purchase a primatology related
        documentary that I can show in my Introductory Anthropology course. I am
        currently using the Haviland, et. al Essence of Anthropology text. I am
        looking for something that is up-to-date, comprehensive, interesting, at
        about an hour's length and suitable for an introductory class.

        I would greatly appreciate any suggestions.

        Thanks,

        Jason

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        __________________________________________________________
        Be a better friend, newshound, and
        know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.
        http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ
        <http://mobile.yahoo.com/;_ylt=Ahu06i62sR8HDtDypao8Wcj9tAcJ>

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Lloyd Miller
        Regarding primates, I should mention that Des Moines has a world- class primate research center, only several years old, called the Great Ape Trust. Its
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 8, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Regarding primates, I should mention that Des Moines has a world-
          class primate research center, only several years old, called the
          Great Ape Trust. Its website is www.greatapetrust.org/. I don't
          think they've produced any films yet but they may have some short
          videos available on specific projects. Orangutans and bonobos are
          their main focus. Students might find the site useful.

          (Ha, we're not just for caucuses anymore! :)

          Lloyd



          On Jan 8, 2008, at 10:54 AM, Pam Ford wrote:

          > I still like the very old "Life in the Trees" episode from David
          > Attenborough's "Life on Earth" series. I have to borrow it (VHS) every
          > semester from my public library but the animals are all in the wild
          > (or
          > look like they are!) and the number of species is not overwhelming.
          >
          > I look forward to seeing the new ones that Linda just described.
          >
          > ~Pam Ford



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.