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Anthros and Middle East—opportunity to contr ibute

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  • Lloyd Miller
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    Message 1 of 1 , Sep 4, 2006
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      Begin forwarded message:

      > From: "Stacy Lathrop" <slathrop@...>
      > Date: August 30, 2006 3:34:04 PM CDT
      > To: "Stacy Lathrop" <slathrop@...>
      > Cc: "Sarah Walker" <swalker@...>
      > Subject: AN Sept 15 Deadline Reminder and CFP on Anthros and Middle
      > East
      >
      >
      >
      > Dear AN Contributing Editors,
      >
      >
      >
      > This is a friendly reminder that your columns for the November
      > issue of Anthropology News are due Friday, September 15.
      >
      >
      >
      > Also, please find pasted below a framework for discussion on
      > Anthropologists and the Middle East authored by AAA Committee for
      > Human Rights Members Susan Slyomovics and Kamran Ali. Feel free to
      > circulate and comment, noting the Sept 15 deadline.
      >
      >
      >
      > With thanks and best wishes,
      >
      >
      >
      > Stacy
      >
      >
      >
      > Stacy Lathrop
      >
      > Managing Editor
      >
      > Anthropology News
      >
      > American Anthropological Association
      >
      > 2200 Wilson Blvd., Suite 600
      >
      > Arlington, VA 22201-3357
      >
      > tel 703/528-1902 x3005
      >
      > fax 703/528-3546
      >
      > slathrop@...
      >
      > www.aaanet.org
      >
      >
      >
      > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
      > -----------------------------
      >
      >
      >
      > Anthropologists and the Middle East
      >
      >
      >
      > By Susan Slyomovics and Kamran Ali
      >
      > AAA Committee for Human Rights
      >
      >
      >
      > The focus of anthropology is more often than not on individuals and
      > groups rather than states, while international legal norms,
      > geopolitical concerns and actors usually dictate the study of key
      > human rights issues. The study of nationalisms, state actors, large
      > scale migrations, refugee populations, wars/conflict and sectarian
      > strife
      >
      > within the framework of global and local relationships has,
      > however, shaped anthropology's more recent attention to studying
      > communities and people at risk in different parts of the globe.
      >
      >
      >
      > Within this broader context, what insights do anthropology and
      > anthropologists bring to the larger transnational and international
      > conflicts of the Middle East? With anthropology's long standing
      > claims of cultural and heritage preservation, our solidarity with
      > varied cultures and people on the ground, how do anthropologists
      > engage with issues of national self-determination, peaceful co-
      > existence, religious and cultural difference, human rights, the
      > conduct of war including the social and economic impact on the
      > common person in the region? What methodological, thematic,
      > comparative, and theoretical input can anthropologists offer to
      > understand the ongoing tensions in the region outside dominant
      > paradigms of "terrorism" and frameworks that pit Islam against the
      > West?
      >
      >
      >
      > For American anthropologists, given the increasing inclination by
      > the US and its allies to use force in the Middle East (Afghanistan,
      > Iraq, Lebanon, potential threat to Iran), what does it mean to
      > conduct research in the region during war and conflict? Similarly
      > with deteriorating personal security in some places and escalating
      > popular mistrust of Western researchers in the entire region, would
      > it be possible to conduct future investigations (cultural,
      > archeological, linguistic) in the area? How would the possibility
      > of diminished research affect our long-term understanding of Middle
      > Eastern and Muslim societies in general? And what about
      > anthropologists and human-rights workers from the region, many
      > American-trained and educated, whether living in the west or in
      > their home areas?
      >
      >
      >
      > Historically, how were social scientists from the west implicated
      > in colonialist or neo-colonialist ethnographic research projects in
      > the Middle East and what are the ways in which anthropology's
      > complicated past continues to shape our current research questions
      > and choice of terrain? Or, can we provide, due to our long term
      > engagement as scholars of the region and its people, other
      > perspectives and also be a conduit for voices and viewpoints from
      > the area that are not often heard in our own media?
      >
      >
      >
      > Please send comments of under 1000 words to Stacy Lathrop,
      > slathrop@... by Sept 15, 2006.
      >
      >
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