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FW: 3/4/2005 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 3/4/2005 Daily Report from The
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 5, 2005
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Friday, March 04, 2005 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 3/4/2005 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      _________________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Friday, March 4.



      [snip]

      _________________________________________________________________

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the winter issue of "Daedalus":
      When race matters

      People of different races are not essentially different kinds of
      people, and racial classification is more useful for building
      and maintaining empires than for understanding anything about
      individuals, says Ian Hacking, a professor of philosophy and
      history of scientific concepts at the College of France.
      However, in certain circumstances, particularly in medicine, it
      can be useful to consider race, he says.

      Leukemia patients who need bone-marrow transplants, for example,
      must receive them from donors who have matching human leukocyte
      antigens. Such antigens, he says, are "unevenly distributed
      among ethnic and racial groups," so patients are more likely to
      find matching donors within their own group.

      There are registries for donors from different groups, and if
      you visit their Web sites, he says, "you will see they do not
      shilly-shally in some dance of euphemistic political correctness
      about race."

      "For them," he writes, "it is a matter of life and death."
      Unfortunately, "every time such a phenomenon is found useful,
      the racists will try to exploit the racial difference," he says.

      The answer is not to play down differences that are
      statistically significant and potentially useful, he says.
      Rather, it is "to make it common knowledge that specific
      differences among peoples may be used in helping them."

      The article, "Why Race Still Matters," which is part of a theme
      issue on race, is not online. Information about the journal is
      available at http://www.amacad.org/publications/daedalus.aspx

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      Copyright (c) 2005 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.
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