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FW: 1/24/2005 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    Subject: 1/24/2005 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education s Daily Report for subscribers
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 24, 2005
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      Subject: 1/24/2005 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      _________________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      [snip]
      * CALIFORNIA'S ONLY TRIBAL COLLEGE lost its accreditation last
      week, rocking an institution that was already reeling from
      financial and management troubles.
      --> SEE http://chronicle.com/daily/2005/01/2005012408n.htm



      [snip]
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      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the January/February issue of "Society":
      The new culture of culture

      The developed world has become infatuated with the idea of
      culture as the framework for understanding everything, says
      David Steigerwald, an associate professor of history at Ohio
      State University at Marion.

      "Culture has become to our time what religion was to the early
      modern period and science to the Enlightenment," he writes.

      We now have cultural politics, cultural citizenship, culture
      wars, and corporate cultures, he says. Fly fishermen and Elvis
      fans have their own cultures, as do drug addicts and people in
      recovery from addiction.

      "We have oversold culture," he contends. "We have come to see it
      as far too powerful a thing. Stretching culture to encompass
      everything, using it as shorthand for complicated social
      developments, we have made the term meaningless, the fate of all
      overused words."

      And focusing too much on culture can be dangerous, he argues,
      because it draws attention away from real sources of power, like
      wealth and the state.

      "Had Mao labored under the cultural determinism of our time," he
      writes, "he would have said that power comes out of his ideas
      about the barrel of a gun."

      The article, "Our New Cultural Determinism," is not online.
      Information about the journal is available at
      http://www.transactionpub.com/

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      Copyright (c) 2005 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.
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