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FW: 12/13/2004 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Monday, December 13, 2004 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 12/13/2004 Daily Report from The
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 13, 2004
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      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Monday, December 13, 2004 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 12/13/2004 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      _________________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Monday, December 13.

      [snip]
      *


      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the November/December issue of "Science & Spirit":
      How the King James Bible changed English

      William Shakespeare never read the writing on the wall, fell
      flat on his face, or escaped anything by the skin of his teeth
      because he died just when the King James version of the Bible
      was beginning to influence the English language, says Alister
      McGrath, a professor of historical theology at the University of
      Oxford.

      The translators who produced the early-17th-century King James
      Bible believed that a word-by-word translation of Greek and
      Hebrew texts would be the most accurate, he says, so they did
      not paraphrase idiomatic expressions. "This literal translation
      of the Old Testament's Hebrew introduced a large number of new,
      and somewhat unusual, phrases into the English language," he
      writes.

      At first, phrases like "to pour out one's heart," "from time to
      time," and "to stand in awe" may have seemed strange, Mr.
      McGrath says, but they quickly became familiar and were absorbed
      into the language.

      That should be no surprise, he says, because English has always
      been remarkably willing to borrow words from other languages --
      so much so that studying the history of English is "like looking
      into a verbal melting pot."

      "Maybe there is nothing new under the sun after all," he writes.
      "Now wouldn't that be a fly in our ointment."

      The article, "Something New Under the Sun," is online at
      http://www.science-spirit.org/

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      Copyright (c) 2004 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.
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