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FW: 11/22/2004 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 11/22/2004 Daily Report from The
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 22, 2004
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Monday, November 22, 2004 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 11/22/2004 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      _________________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Monday, November 22.


      [snip]

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the November 18 issue of "Nature":
      The role of running in human evolution

      The human ability to run long distances may be more than a side
      effect of adaptations for walking, two scholars say. It may have
      been a major factor in shaping how the species evolved.

      Human beings are the only primates capable of long-distance
      running, write Dennis M. Bramble, a professor of biology at the
      University of Utah, and Daniel E. Lieberman, a professor of
      biological anthropology at Harvard University. And the human
      body is well adapted for running, they add, with special
      structures for storing energy and stabilizing the body that are
      useful in running but not in walking.

      While people are not as good at sprinting as most four-legged
      animals, the authors say, a well-conditioned person can perform
      as well as many quadrupeds in endurance running and can
      occasionally even outrun horses over extremely long distances.

      Natural selection may have favored traits related to
      long-distance running because it made our ancestors better
      hunters and scavengers, the authors suggest. If so, running "may
      have made possible a diet rich in fats and proteins thought to
      account for the unique human combination of large bodies, small
      guts, big brains, and small teeth," they write.

      Today long-distance running "is primarily a form of exercise and
      recreation," they write, "but its roots may be as ancient as the
      origin of the human genus, and its demands a major contributing
      factor to the human body form."

      The article is online for subscribers; information about the
      magazine is available at http://www.nature.com/nature/

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