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RE: Spam (Message score):RE: [SACC-L] FW: Kokopelli "our dancing friend......"

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  • Lewine, Mark
    I feel that our use of Kokopelli relates to several traditional meanings: it symbolizes the synergy of body, mind and spirit (with a sense of humor) which we
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 5, 2004
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      I feel that our use of Kokopelli relates to several traditional meanings: it symbolizes the synergy of body, mind and spirit (with a sense of humor) which we strive for as a SACC community, and which other cultures seem to use in similar ways, along with Pan and Coyote and others.
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Chidester, Dianne (Jefferson) [mailto:Dianne.Chidester@...]
      Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 5:57 PM
      To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Spam (Message score):RE: [SACC-L] FW: Kokopelli "our dancing friend......"

      Just to put a little different slant on this…  What about all the Indian-made silver with Kokopelli on it?  Can one be a “non-practicing Indian” and it’s okay to use this symbol for personal gain?  (BTW, I use the term “Indian” because my students in South Dakota and Russell Means told me it was what they preferred.)

       

      This could get interesting!  -- Dianne

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Popplestone, Ann [mailto:ann.popplestone@...]
      Sent: Thursday, March 04, 2004 2:49 PM
      To: SACC-L (SACC-L)
      Subject: [SACC-L] FW: Kokopelli "our dancing friend......"

       

      Thoughts and opinions?

       

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Jan Tucker [mailto:jtucker@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, March 03, 2004 1:40 PM
      To: Popplestone, Ann
      Cc: Wolves5149@...; Aimfl@...; Rabeaul@...; Mark Madrid; DNarcomey@...
      Subject: Kokopelli "our dancing friend......"

      Dear Ann Popplestone,

       

      I'm writing to comment to Kokopelli image usage for the SACC [image, icon, symbol]. An American Indian activist friend sent this webpage to me knowing I'm an Applied Cultural Anthropologists.  I read the information from the page linked below which discusses "Kokopelli our dancing friend....."  written by Karen Yaeger. I can't tell a date for this essay, but I accessed it on 3/3/04 at this WWW address http://ccanthro.bizland.com/koko.htm 

       

      My concern is the use of the image is problematic ethically. Considering native people's position on the appropriation of their sacred spiritual practices (and all that goes with this appropriation, in this case imagrey of a diety).  I suggest the SACC examin closer the ethics of using this image to represent something other than what it is meant to represent). I suggest that applied cultural anthropologists show the utmost respect and sensitivity to not using inappropriatly sacred images or becoming part of "the world of kitsch" the Ms. Yeates discusses in the quotes below.  It is ethically wrong to appropriate "Kokopelli our dancing friend...." from the Hopi people today who "keep their religion "separare, apart, or "secret"". I suggest we immediately remove the cartoonish dancing image of Kokopelli: "...Kokopelli deserve[s] the same reverence (and respect) that the symbols of Chrisitianity or Judaism receive". So in removing the image we then give in action what we give in lip serves in this essay: "reverence", "respect" . 

       

      See below for quotes in context.

       

      "Apparently, Kokopelli is just as important to the Hopi today, as he was in the past, he being the important rain priest, associated with the locust and found often together with the snake."

       

      "In one respect, I find it curious that no one else attempted to discuss Kokopelli; perhaps part of the reason is that this is just another example of how something sacred has been appropriated into the world of kitsch. So, it comes as no surprise that the Hopi, from what I understand, prefer to keep their religion as separate, apart, or "secret" from the contemporary world. Also, it seems important to me to realize that figures like Kokopelli deserve the same reverence (and respect) that the symbols of Christianity or Judaism receive."

       

      Feel Free to Forward, post, share this message widely.

       

      Jan B. Tucker

      jtucker@...

      Adjucnt Professor

      Applied Cultural Anthropologist

      Saine Leo Univeristy and

      Lake City Community College

      Lake City, FL

       

      Support Group Coordinator

      Bell Support Group AIM, FL

      American Indian Movement of Florida

       

       



      Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc  (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.





      Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc  (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.


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