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FW: 12/9/2003 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2003 7:55 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 12/9/2003 Daily Report from
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 9, 2003
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, December 09, 2003 7:55 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 12/9/2003 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education


      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      _________________________________________________________________

      Good day!


      [snip]


      OVERCOMING THE ODDS: M. Garrett Bauman, a professor of English
      at Monroe Community College in New York, stands in awe of what
      some students have survived to get to college -- and to stay
      there.
      --> SEE http://chronicle.com/weekly/v50/i16/16b00501.htm

      [snip]

      __________________________

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the current issue of "Cerebrum":
      Dance and the brain

      The unseen partner in any dance performance is the viewer's
      brain, according to Ivar Hagendoorn, a choreographer who studies
      the cognitive and mathematical foundations of dance.

      "The appreciation of dance has something to do with the
      interplay of expectations and their fulfillment," he writes.
      Studies suggest that when the eye sees a moving object, the
      brain predicts where it will go next. "If the brain fails to
      predict correctly the unfolding of a movement, we are taken by
      surprise," he writes. That surprise can be enjoyable, like the
      surprises we find pleasing in music and humor, he says.

      "This may also explain why music and dance mix so well: A
      buildup of expectation on an auditory level can find its
      realization on a visual level," he writes. "This way of
      analyzing dance also allows us to explain why certain dance
      performances are boring -- for example, because they do not hold
      our attention by varying from our expectations," he says.

      There is evidence that watching someone move activates motor
      areas in the observer's brain. If that is so, Mr. Hagendoorn
      writes, "then we could say that when watching dance, the brain
      dances."

      The article, "The Dancing Brain," is online at
      http://www.dana.org/books/press/cerebrum/
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