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FW: seeking co-sponsorship

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  • Rebecca L. Stein
    Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session at this year’s AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other groups.
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 8, 2003

      Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session at this year’s AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other groups.  This request comes from the National Association of Student Anthropologists.  Let me know what you think.

       

      --Becky

       

       

      -----Original Message-----
      From: aaaprogram-request@... [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
      Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
      To: aaaprogram@...
      Subject: seeking co-sponsorship

       

      NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited program.  We would really like to get the following two sessions on our program.  If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these sessions please email me at LJohns1@....  Thank you for your consideration! 

      Lori Johns

       

      1)  Organizer:  Jason Miller

      Participants:
      * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
      * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
      * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
      * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
      * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
      * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
      * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University

      Abstract:
      How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
      justice central to disciplinary practice?  How can anthropology programs
      be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
      and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
      build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
      others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
      of
      anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
      examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
      multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.

      In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
      understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
      will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
      production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance. 
      Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
      programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
      movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
      and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
      production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
      beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.

      2)  Individual abstracts are attached.

      Session Abstract:

      Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The 50-Year “Crash” and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice 

      Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo (Michigan State University)

      Discussants:  Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA

       

      International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.  But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of development, its traditional “owners” (nation-states and international lending agencies) are now complemented—and at times entirely replaced—by NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations.  Development’s modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often focusing on what development does or should mean to those being “developed,” and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style development.

       

      Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel critically examines their effects on the development field.  Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in globalization and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice.  The first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse ways in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.  The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of “counter-development.”  Third is the effect of globalization on development design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated NGO activity.  Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local and global identity politics play in shaping development. 

       

    • Lloyd Miller
      Becky, I like #1. I would recommend we go with it! Lloyd ... ADVERTISEMENT ... Becky, I like #1. I would recommend we go with it! Lloyd Rebecca L. Stein
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 8, 2003
        Becky,

        I like #1.  I would recommend we go with it!

        Lloyd

        "Rebecca L. Stein" wrote:

        Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session at this year’s AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other groups.This request comes from the National Association of Student Anthropologists.Let me know what you think.

        --Becky

        -----Original Message-----
        From: aaaprogram-request@... [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
        Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
        To: aaaprogram@...
        Subject: seeking co-sponsorship

        NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited program.  We would really like to get the following two sessions on our program.  If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these sessions please email me at LJohns1@....  Thank you for your consideration! 

        Lori Johns

        1)  Organizer:  Jason Miller

        Participants:
        * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
        * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
        * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
        * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
        * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
        * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
        * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University

        Abstract:
        How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
        justice central to disciplinary practice?  How can anthropology programs
        be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
        and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
        build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
        others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
        of
        anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
        examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
        multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.

        In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
        understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
        will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
        production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
        Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
        programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
        movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
        and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
        production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
        beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.

        2)  Individual abstracts are attached. 

        Session Abstract: 

        Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The 50-Year “Crash” and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice

        Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo (Michigan State University)

        Discussants:Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA

        International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering. But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of development, its traditional “owners” (nation-states and international lending agencies) are now complemented—and at times entirely replaced—by NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations.Development’s modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often focusing on what development does or should mean to those being “developed,” and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style development. 

        Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel critically examines their effects on the development field.Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America and the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in globalization and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice.The first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse ways in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of “counter-development.”Third is the effect of globalization on development design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated NGO activity.Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local and global identity politics play in shaping development.



        Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc  (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

      • balzano, anthony
        We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC. If we
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 10, 2003
          We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC. If we are co-sponsoring then only half of our alloted time will be taken thereby leaving the other half still to be used. Under any cirsumstances, SACC should use its allotted time of 3.5 hours or risk losing it in the future.
          --Tony

          >>> rls@... 03/08/03 11:58AM >>>
          Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session
          at this year's AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other
          groups. This request comes from the National Association of Student
          Anthropologists. Let me know what you think.

          --Becky


          -----Original Message-----
          From: aaaprogram-request@...
          [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
          Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
          To: aaaprogram@...
          Subject: seeking co-sponsorship

          NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited
          program. We would really like to get the following two sessions on our
          program. If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these
          sessions please email me at LJohns1@... <mailto:LJohns1@...>
          . Thank you for your consideration!
          Lori Johns

          1) Organizer: Jason Miller

          Participants:
          * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
          * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
          * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
          * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
          * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
          * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
          * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University

          Abstract:
          How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
          justice central to disciplinary practice? How can anthropology programs
          be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
          and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
          build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
          others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
          of
          anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
          examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
          multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.

          In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
          understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
          will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
          production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
          Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
          programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
          movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
          and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
          production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
          beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.
          2) Individual abstracts are attached.
          Session Abstract:
          Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The 50-Year
          "Crash" and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice
          Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo
          (Michigan State University)
          Discussants: Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA

          International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a
          modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.
          But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of
          development, its traditional "owners" (nation-states and international
          lending agencies) are now complemented―and at times entirely replaced―by
          NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations. Development's
          modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism
          and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often
          focusing on what development does or should mean to those being "developed,"
          and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style
          development.

          Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel
          critically examines their effects on the development field. Drawing on
          ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America and
          the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which
          demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in globalization
          and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice. The
          first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring
          the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and
          transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse ways
          in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.
          The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with
          presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of
          "counter-development." Third is the effect of globalization on development
          design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and
          technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and
          participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated
          NGO activity. Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local and
          global identity politics play in shaping development.
        • Lloyd Miller
          I agree with Tony. I think a SACC membership for our time is a fair trade. Lloyd
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 10, 2003
            I agree with Tony. I think a SACC membership for our time is a fair trade.
            Lloyd

            "balzano, anthony" wrote:

            > We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC. If we are co-sponsoring then only half of our alloted time will be taken thereby leaving the other half still to be used. Under any cirsumstances, SACC should use its allotted time of 3.5 hours or risk losing it in the future.
            > --Tony
            >
            > >>> rls@... 03/08/03 11:58AM >>>
            > Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session
            > at this year's AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other
            > groups. This request comes from the National Association of Student
            > Anthropologists. Let me know what you think.
            >
            > --Becky
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: aaaprogram-request@...
            > [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
            > Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
            > To: aaaprogram@...
            > Subject: seeking co-sponsorship
            >
            > NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited
            > program. We would really like to get the following two sessions on our
            > program. If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these
            > sessions please email me at LJohns1@... <mailto:LJohns1@...>
            > . Thank you for your consideration!
            > Lori Johns
            >
            > 1) Organizer: Jason Miller
            >
            > Participants:
            > * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
            > * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
            > * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
            > * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
            > * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
            > * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
            > * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University
            >
            > Abstract:
            > How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
            > justice central to disciplinary practice? How can anthropology programs
            > be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
            > and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
            > build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
            > others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
            > of
            > anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
            > examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
            > multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.
            >
            > In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
            > understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
            > will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
            > production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
            > Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
            > programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
            > movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
            > and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
            > production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
            > beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.
            > 2) Individual abstracts are attached.
            > Session Abstract:
            > Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The 50-Year
            > "Crash" and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice
            > Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo
            > (Michigan State University)
            > Discussants: Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA
            >
            > International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a
            > modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.
            > But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of
            > development, its traditional "owners" (nation-states and international
            > lending agencies) are now complemented¯and at times entirely replaced¯by
            > NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations. Development's
            > modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism
            > and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often
            > focusing on what development does or should mean to those being "developed,"
            > and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style
            > development.
            >
            > Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel
            > critically examines their effects on the development field. Drawing on
            > ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America and
            > the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which
            > demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in globalization
            > and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice. The
            > first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring
            > the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and
            > transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse ways
            > in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.
            > The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with
            > presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of
            > "counter-development." Third is the effect of globalization on development
            > design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and
            > technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and
            > participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated
            > NGO activity. Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local and
            > global identity politics play in shaping development.
            >
            > Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          • Lewine, Mark
            Good idea- but let s do it right and get the opinion of our SAA member, Eric Peters and the other Eric, the president of SAA who has been very supportive also.
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 11, 2003
              Good idea- but let's do it right and get the opinion of our SAA member, Eric Peters and the other Eric, the president of SAA who has been very supportive also.

              -----Original Message-----
              From: Lloyd Miller [mailto:lloyd.miller@...]
              Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 2:30 PM
              To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: Re: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

              I agree with Tony. I think a SACC membership for our time is a fair trade.
              Lloyd

              "balzano, anthony" wrote:

              > We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC. If we are co-sponsoring then only half of our alloted time will be taken thereby leaving the other half still to be used. Under any cirsumstances, SACC should use its allotted time of 3.5 hours or risk losing it in the future.
              > --Tony
              >
              > >>> rls@... 03/08/03 11:58AM >>>
              > Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session
              > at this year's AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other
              > groups. This request comes from the National Association of Student
              > Anthropologists. Let me know what you think.
              >
              > --Becky
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: aaaprogram-request@...
              > [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
              > Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
              > To: aaaprogram@...
              > Subject: seeking co-sponsorship
              >
              > NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited
              > program. We would really like to get the following two sessions on our
              > program. If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these
              > sessions please email me at LJohns1@... <mailto:LJohns1@...>
              > . Thank you for your consideration!
              > Lori Johns
              >
              > 1) Organizer: Jason Miller
              >
              > Participants:
              > * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
              > * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
              > * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
              > * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
              > * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
              > * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
              > * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University
              >
              > Abstract:
              > How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
              > justice central to disciplinary practice? How can anthropology programs
              > be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
              > and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
              > build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
              > others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
              > of
              > anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
              > examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
              > multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.
              >
              > In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
              > understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
              > will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
              > production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
              > Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
              > programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
              > movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
              > and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
              > production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
              > beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.
              > 2) Individual abstracts are attached.
              > Session Abstract:
              > Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The 50-Year
              > "Crash" and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice
              > Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo
              > (Michigan State University)
              > Discussants: Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA
              >
              > International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a
              > modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.
              > But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of
              > development, its traditional "owners" (nation-states and international
              > lending agencies) are now complemented¯and at times entirely replaced¯by
              > NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations. Development's
              > modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism
              > and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often
              > focusing on what development does or should mean to those being "developed,"
              > and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style
              > development.
              >
              > Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel
              > critically examines their effects on the development field. Drawing on
              > ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America and
              > the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which
              > demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in globalization
              > and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice. The
              > first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring
              > the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and
              > transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse ways
              > in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.
              > The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with
              > presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of
              > "counter-development." Third is the effect of globalization on development
              > design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and
              > technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and
              > participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated
              > NGO activity. Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local and
              > global identity politics play in shaping development.
              >
              > Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


              Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

              Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • Rebecca L. Stein
              Excuse my ignorance, but what is SAA? ... From: Lewine, Mark [mailto:mark.lewine@tri-c.cc.oh.us] Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 1:04 PM To:
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 11, 2003
                Excuse my ignorance, but what is SAA?


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Lewine, Mark [mailto:mark.lewine@...]
                Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 1:04 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

                Good idea- but let's do it right and get the opinion of our SAA member, Eric
                Peters and the other Eric, the president of SAA who has been very supportive
                also.

                -----Original Message-----
                From: Lloyd Miller [mailto:lloyd.miller@...]
                Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 2:30 PM
                To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

                I agree with Tony. I think a SACC membership for our time is a fair trade.
                Lloyd

                "balzano, anthony" wrote:

                > We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are
                taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC.
                If we are co-sponsoring then only half of our alloted time will be taken
                thereby leaving the other half still to be used. Under any cirsumstances,
                SACC should use its allotted time of 3.5 hours or risk losing it in the
                future.
                > --Tony
                >
                > >>> rls@... 03/08/03 11:58AM >>>
                > Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session
                > at this year's AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other
                > groups. This request comes from the National Association of Student
                > Anthropologists. Let me know what you think.
                >
                > --Becky
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: aaaprogram-request@...
                > [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
                > Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
                > To: aaaprogram@...
                > Subject: seeking co-sponsorship
                >
                > NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited
                > program. We would really like to get the following two sessions on our
                > program. If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these
                > sessions please email me at LJohns1@...
                <mailto:LJohns1@...>
                > . Thank you for your consideration!
                > Lori Johns
                >
                > 1) Organizer: Jason Miller
                >
                > Participants:
                > * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
                > * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
                > * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
                > * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
                > * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
                > * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
                > * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University
                >
                > Abstract:
                > How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
                > justice central to disciplinary practice? How can anthropology programs
                > be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
                > and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
                > build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
                > others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
                > of
                > anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
                > examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
                > multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.
                >
                > In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
                > understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
                > will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
                > production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
                > Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
                > programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
                > movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
                > and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
                > production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
                > beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.
                > 2) Individual abstracts are attached.
                > Session Abstract:
                > Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The
                50-Year
                > "Crash" and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice
                > Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo
                > (Michigan State University)
                > Discussants: Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA
                >
                > International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a
                > modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.
                > But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of
                > development, its traditional "owners" (nation-states and international
                > lending agencies) are now complemented¯and at times entirely replaced¯by
                > NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations.
                Development's
                > modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism
                > and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often
                > focusing on what development does or should mean to those being
                "developed,"
                > and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style
                > development.
                >
                > Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel
                > critically examines their effects on the development field. Drawing on
                > ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America
                and
                > the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which
                > demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in
                globalization
                > and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice.
                The
                > first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring
                > the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and
                > transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse
                ways
                > in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.
                > The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with
                > presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of
                > "counter-development." Third is the effect of globalization on
                development
                > design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and
                > technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and
                > participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated
                > NGO activity. Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local
                and
                > global identity politics play in shaping development.
                >
                > Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.
                >
                > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

                Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
              • Lewine, Mark
                Sorry, I was confused with acronyms, the student anthropology association is NASA. They are the section of the AAA lead by the Erics et al. SAA is the
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 12, 2003
                  Sorry, I was confused with acronyms, the student anthropology association is NASA. They are the section of the AAA lead by the Erics et al. SAA is the Society for Applied Anthro.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Rebecca L. Stein [mailto:rls@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 5:23 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

                  Excuse my ignorance, but what is SAA?


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Lewine, Mark [mailto:mark.lewine@...]
                  Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2003 1:04 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

                  Good idea- but let's do it right and get the opinion of our SAA member, Eric
                  Peters and the other Eric, the president of SAA who has been very supportive
                  also.

                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Lloyd Miller [mailto:lloyd.miller@...]
                  Sent: Monday, March 10, 2003 2:30 PM
                  To: SACC-L@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [SACC-L] FW: seeking co-sponsorship

                  I agree with Tony. I think a SACC membership for our time is a fair trade.
                  Lloyd

                  "balzano, anthony" wrote:

                  > We could probably sponsor both if they are 1.75 hours each. If they are
                  taking our time we can insist that at least one of the organizers join SACC.
                  If we are co-sponsoring then only half of our alloted time will be taken
                  thereby leaving the other half still to be used. Under any cirsumstances,
                  SACC should use its allotted time of 3.5 hours or risk losing it in the
                  future.
                  > --Tony
                  >
                  > >>> rls@... 03/08/03 11:58AM >>>
                  > Since nobody has contacted me about wanting to do a SACC sponsored session
                  > at this year's AAA, we do have room for cosponsoring sessions with other
                  > groups. This request comes from the National Association of Student
                  > Anthropologists. Let me know what you think.
                  >
                  > --Becky
                  >
                  > -----Original Message-----
                  > From: aaaprogram-request@...
                  > [mailto:aaaprogram-request@...]On Behalf Of Lori Johns
                  > Sent: Friday, March 07, 2003 9:37 PM
                  > To: aaaprogram@...
                  > Subject: seeking co-sponsorship
                  >
                  > NASA has received too many quality submissions this year for the invited
                  > program. We would really like to get the following two sessions on our
                  > program. If anyone is interested in co-sponsoring one or both of these
                  > sessions please email me at LJohns1@...
                  <mailto:LJohns1@...>
                  > . Thank you for your consideration!
                  > Lori Johns
                  >
                  > 1) Organizer: Jason Miller
                  >
                  > Participants:
                  > * Angana Chatterji, California Institute of Integral Studies
                  > * Richard Shapiro, California Institute of Integral Studies
                  > * Kenneth Rowe, California Institute of Integral Studies
                  > * Joyce Hammond, Western Washington University
                  > * Jason Miller, Western Washington University
                  > * Siv Spain, Western Washington University
                  > * Lisa Citron, Teachers College, Columbia University
                  >
                  > Abstract:
                  > How can anthropologists and anthropology students make issues of social
                  > justice central to disciplinary practice? How can anthropology programs
                  > be used as vehicles for promoting social change? How do we facilitate
                  > and engage in interdisciplinary and cross-cultural communication to
                  > build alliances for change? How do we develop methods that best serve
                  > others? These are the guiding questions we will use in our discussion
                  > of
                  > anthropological learning as service learning. Through this, we will
                  > examine capacity building for critical thinking, social analysis and
                  > multicultural practice as it relates to anthropological education.
                  >
                  > In a round table format, we will seek to identify how the discipline
                  > understands, hinders, and promotes connections to the marginalized. We
                  > will seek to identify how the discipline continues to rethink knowledge
                  > production addressing issues of power, truth, culture and relevance.
                  > Elaborating on our own participation within graduate anthropology
                  > programs involved in emancipatory academic practice, postcolonial
                  > movements for social justice, ecological restoration, religious freedom
                  > and education, this panel will examine contexts which enable the
                  > production of relevant knowledge for and within communities which is
                  > beneficial to students, teachers and other stakeholders.
                  > 2) Individual abstracts are attached.
                  > Session Abstract:
                  > Crafting Peace and Prosperity through International Development: The
                  50-Year
                  > "Crash" and the Reconstruction of Discourse, Theory and Practice
                  > Co-Organizers: Tara Hefferan (Michigan State University) and Keri Brondo
                  > (Michigan State University)
                  > Discussants: Sangeeta Kamat (University of Massachussettes) and other TBA
                  >
                  > International development is a post-World War II phenomena propelled by a
                  > modernist paradigm, and belief in growth, progress and social engineering.
                  > But, as globalization and neoliberalism encourage the privatization of
                  > development, its traditional "owners" (nation-states and international
                  > lending agencies) are now complemented¯and at times entirely replaced¯by
                  > NGOs, faith-based institutions and indigenous organizations.
                  Development's
                  > modernist underpinnings have become subject to growing scrutiny, criticism
                  > and challenge as these new actors define development in novel ways, often
                  > focusing on what development does or should mean to those being
                  "developed,"
                  > and explicitly rejecting hegemonic constructions of Western-style
                  > development.
                  >
                  > Exploring these increasingly important development actors, this panel
                  > critically examines their effects on the development field. Drawing on
                  > ethnographic fieldwork in Asia, Africa, the United States, Latin America
                  and
                  > the Caribbean, the panel offers three overlapping themes, the sum of which
                  > demand new theoretical approaches to explain current trends in
                  globalization
                  > and the changing nature of development discourse, theory, and practice.
                  The
                  > first is the re-shaping of development discourse, with panelists exploring
                  > the deprofessionalization of development discourses, the insertion and
                  > transformation of global discourses at the local level, and the diverse
                  ways
                  > in which people generate, resist and accommodate development discourses.
                  > The second deconstructs how development discourse works in practice, with
                  > presenters offering critiques and locally-grounded examples of
                  > "counter-development." Third is the effect of globalization on
                  development
                  > design and delivery, with panelists exploring global communications and
                  > technology, the flows of discourses on human rights, gender equality and
                  > participatory development, and the ever-expanding spread of uncoordinated
                  > NGO activity. Moreover, panelists consider the critical role that local
                  and
                  > global identity politics play in shaping development.
                  >
                  > Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                  ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


                  Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                  ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                  Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW
                  ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/



                  Be sure to check out the SACC web page at www.anthro.cc (NOTE THE NEW ADDRESS!!) for meeting materials, newsletters, etc.

                  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                • dkrass@aol.com
                  In the past I ve often seen this written as SfAA, to distinguish the Society for Applied Anthropology from the Society for American Archaeology. ... In a
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 12, 2003
                    In the past I've often seen this written as SfAA, to distinguish the Society
                    for Applied Anthropology from the Society for American Archaeology.

                    :-)

                    In a message dated 3/12/03 1:12:18 PM, mark.lewine@... writes:

                    << Sorry, I was confused with acronyms, the student anthropology association
                    is NASA. They are the section of the AAA lead by the Erics et al. SAA is
                    the Society for Applied Anthro. >>
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