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FW: 10/29/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2002 5:01 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 10/29/2002 Daily Report from
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 29, 2002
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, October 29, 2002 5:01 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 10/29/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education


      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      ______________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Tuesday, October 29.



      [snip]
      _________________________________________________________________

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the fall issue of "Pedagogy": Teaching American
      studies in West Africa and beyond

      College students in West Africa are being given "a simplistic,
      limited view of the roles of race and region in American
      society," according to David G. Nicholls, director of book
      publications at the Modern Language Association and a former
      instructor at the University of Dakar and the University of
      Ouagadougou. West African academe places a great deal of
      emphasis on African-American literature, he argues, by
      sacrificing other important areas of American studies.

      "Despite the critical discourse found in most African-American
      literature, the field is amply supported by the U.S. government
      in West Africa," he writes, which partially explains why it has
      come to dominate American studies there. Through academic
      opportunities such as travel grants, the United States is able
      to direct scholarship toward "the peaceful side of the
      civil-rights movement" and away from more radical dissent -- a
      policy the author describes as having "strategic advantages."

      "American studies, as an interdisciplinary field, has long
      expected critical self-reflection of its students and scholars"
      -- a spirit, notes Mr. Nicholls, "that needs to carry over into
      the international classroom." He urges American instructors
      working abroad to encourage foreign students and scholars to
      abandon the "rehearsals of the wrongs done to African
      Americans." They must replace such rehearsals, he concludes,
      with a "genuinely critical discourse grounded in their own
      experiences yet related to the historical presence of the United
      States in the 20th century and beyond."

      The article is available to Project Muse subscribers at
      http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/pedagogy/toc/ped2.3.html
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      Copyright (c) 2002 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.
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