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FW: 6/21/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 6/21/2002 Daily Report from The
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 21, 2002
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      FW: 6/21/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Friday, June 21, 2002 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 6/21/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education


      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      ______________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Friday, June 21.

      * [snip]

      BETTER LIVING THROUGH DRAMA: In Nigeria and other African
      countries, university theater departments send students out to
      villages and neighborhoods, where they engage residents in
      performances that can change lives.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i41/41a04801.htm

      --> FOR THE FULL TEXT of those and all other articles from the
      June 21 issue of The Chronicle, go to "This Week's Chronicle" at
      http://chronicle.com/chronicle
      _________________________________________________________________

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the spring issue of "The Antioch Review":
      Where anthropology and poetry meet

      It is no coincidence that many anthropologists write poetry,
      says Kent Maynard, a professor of anthropology and sociology at
      Denison University and a published poet.

      The developments in contemporary anthropology and in poetry, he
      says, have brought the two realms together. Both now focus on
      the "details and diversity of experience," he writes. "The move
      toward the hurly-burly of experience, rather than orderly
      accounts of supposedly abstract systems, is evident in both the
      content and form of poetry and ethnographic writing."
      Furthermore, in both areas, writers must be "self-reflexive, to
      examine and be explicit about their own morality," according to
      the author.

      Mr. Maynard looks at the words of a variety of poets,
      anthropologists, and writers who are both. He concludes by
      emphasizing that this is a positive new focus for anthropology
      that opens the field to "other dimensions of human life."  Yet,
      he warns against anthropologists' taking "matters to the
      opposite end of the continuum, where bodily experience is
      privileged over disembodied cultural systems or even thoughtful
      conversation."

      The article is not online, but information about the journal is
      available athttp://www.antioch.edu/review/home.html
      _________________________________________________________________

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      Copyright (c) 2002 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.

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