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high school anthro books

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  • LJMil@aol.com
    Dear Mr. Matthews, I may be one of those well-meaning folks who wrote you, but in case not, here s my 2 cents worth. (Caveats:) First, I ve never taught
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 7, 2002
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      Dear Mr. Matthews,

      I may be one of those "well-meaning folks" who wrote you, but in case not,
      here's my 2 cents worth. (Caveats:) First, I've never taught high school so
      I don't know first-hand the differences in reading ability between AP
      students and others. At community colleges, most of our incoming freshmen
      (immediate high school graduates) are not AP students, and many of them do
      lack adequate reading skills. Second, I doubt that a good anthropology
      "text" for a general h.s. population exists. One of SACC's long-term goals
      has been to get anthro. education into the K-12. I applaud you for your
      efforts. Third, I retired from teaching in June 2000 and so am not aware of
      what's on the market since then.

      In addition to Nash's A LITTLE ANTHROPOLOGY that someone recommended to you,
      I'd consider the following (all are paperbacks):

      1) CULTURE AS GIVEN, CULTURE AS CHOICE by Dirk Van der Elst and Paul
      Bohannan. Waveland Press, 1999 (236 pages ISBN: 1-57766-046-3)

      2) ASKING AND LISTENING: ETHNOGRAPHY AS PERSONAL ADAPTATION (same authors,
      same publisher, 1998. ISBN: 0-88133-987-3)

      3) THE CHALLENGE OF HUMAN DIVERSITY: MIRRORS, BRIDGES, AND CHASMS by DeWight
      R. Middleton. also Waveland Press, 1998. (116 pages ISBN: 0-88133-986-5)
      [I used this one in my cultural anthrop. classes the last year I taught and
      would use it again. It brings an anthrop. perspective to current problems
      and issues relating to diversity. That it is written in plain, non-jargon
      English for the general public and is short might appeal to your students.
      Also, it deals directly with problems that they face every day—race,
      ethnicity, gender roles, culture shock, etc.]

      4) ON BECOMING HUMAN: A JOURNEY OF 5,000,000 YEARS by Arthur Niehoff.
      Hominid Press, 1996 (2nd printing, revised; 417 pages. ISBN: 0-9643072-3-5).
      [I also used this book when it first appeared and would use it again. It
      spans the major anthropological topics and is also written in plain English
      for the general public. The first half of each chapter is written fictionally
      as a novel, and the second half is a Socratic-style dialog between teacher
      and student (the kind of inquisitive student you'd love to have) wherein the
      fictional part is discussed and explained in anthropological terms.

      None of these books is a text per se; they don't have chapter summaries,
      photos and graphics or any of the study aid-type ancillaries usually found in
      text books. I think they'd work well in a discussion, Q/A format. If you
      can get students to read them, I think even the most recalcitrant will become
      interested in the subject matter.

      Publishers' addresses are: Waveland Press, Inc. P.O. Box 400, Prospect
      Heights, IL 60070. Tel (847) 634-0081. The Hominid Press, P.O. Box 1481,
      Bonsall, CA 92003-1481. Tel. (760) 728-8123. e-mail niehoff@....

      Regards,
      Lloyd Miller (Editor, Teaching Anthropology: SACC Notes)
    • Ann Kaupp
      Lloyd, we will send him materials from this office. Why don t you put your information in the SACC Bulletin? Or on the web site? It s a start. I read
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 26, 2002
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        Lloyd, we will send him materials from this office. Why don't you put your information in the SACC Bulletin? Or on the web site? It's a start.

        I read earlier that Chuck did not attend the annual meeting. Is he all right?

        >>> LJMil@... 03/07/02 01:03PM >>>
        Dear Mr. Matthews,

        I may be one of those "well-meaning folks" who wrote you, but in case not,
        here's my 2 cents worth. (Caveats:) First, I've never taught high school so
        I don't know first-hand the differences in reading ability between AP
        students and others. At community colleges, most of our incoming freshmen
        (immediate high school graduates) are not AP students, and many of them do
        lack adequate reading skills. Second, I doubt that a good anthropology
        "text" for a general h.s. population exists. One of SACC's long-term goals
        has been to get anthro. education into the K-12. I applaud you for your
        efforts. Third, I retired from teaching in June 2000 and so am not aware of
        what's on the market since then.

        In addition to Nash's A LITTLE ANTHROPOLOGY that someone recommended to you,
        I'd consider the following (all are paperbacks):

        1) CULTURE AS GIVEN, CULTURE AS CHOICE by Dirk Van der Elst and Paul
        Bohannan. Waveland Press, 1999 (236 pages ISBN: 1-57766-046-3)

        2) ASKING AND LISTENING: ETHNOGRAPHY AS PERSONAL ADAPTATION (same authors,
        same publisher, 1998. ISBN: 0-88133-987-3)

        3) THE CHALLENGE OF HUMAN DIVERSITY: MIRRORS, BRIDGES, AND CHASMS by DeWight
        R. Middleton. also Waveland Press, 1998. (116 pages ISBN: 0-88133-986-5)
        [I used this one in my cultural anthrop. classes the last year I taught and
        would use it again. It brings an anthrop. perspective to current problems
        and issues relating to diversity. That it is written in plain, non-jargon
        English for the general public and is short might appeal to your students.
        Also, it deals directly with problems that they face every day―race,
        ethnicity, gender roles, culture shock, etc.]

        4) ON BECOMING HUMAN: A JOURNEY OF 5,000,000 YEARS by Arthur Niehoff.
        Hominid Press, 1996 (2nd printing, revised; 417 pages. ISBN: 0-9643072-3-5).
        [I also used this book when it first appeared and would use it again. It
        spans the major anthropological topics and is also written in plain English
        for the general public. The first half of each chapter is written fictionally
        as a novel, and the second half is a Socratic-style dialog between teacher
        and student (the kind of inquisitive student you'd love to have) wherein the
        fictional part is discussed and explained in anthropological terms.

        None of these books is a text per se; they don't have chapter summaries,
        photos and graphics or any of the study aid-type ancillaries usually found in
        text books. I think they'd work well in a discussion, Q/A format. If you
        can get students to read them, I think even the most recalcitrant will become
        interested in the subject matter.

        Publishers' addresses are: Waveland Press, Inc. P.O. Box 400, Prospect
        Heights, IL 60070. Tel (847) 634-0081. The Hominid Press, P.O. Box 1481,
        Bonsall, CA 92003-1481. Tel. (760) 728-8123. e-mail niehoff@....

        Regards,
        Lloyd Miller (Editor, Teaching Anthropology: SACC Notes)


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