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FW: 1/24/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

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  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2002 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 1/24/2002 Daily Report from
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 24, 2002
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      FW: 1/24/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Thursday, January 24, 2002 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 1/24/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education


      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      ______________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Thursday, January 24.

      [snip]


      HIGHLIGHTS FROM THIS WEEK'S CHRONICLE

      REVISITING A DEAD END: A professor of geology argues that
      science in China stalled hundreds of years ago because Chinese
      artists kept scholars from recognizing the three-dimensional
      structure of the landscape.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/weekly/v48/i20/20a01201.htm

      STIFFER STANDARDS: Some states are seeking to use admissions
      criteria to cut remediation and drive unprepared students to
      two-year colleges.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/free/v48/i20/20a02201.htm


      [snip]

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS

      A glance at the winter issue of "The Antioch Review":
      Stephen Jay Gould contemplates September 11

      For Stephen Jay Gould, a professor of zoology at Harvard
      University and a member of the journal's Advisory Board,
      September 11 was to mark a long-planned family celebration of
      his beloved grandfather's "centennial" -- the day Mr. Gould's
      "Papa Joe" arrived on Ellis Island in 1901. Instead, Mr. Gould
      writes, that terrible day marked a mass "sacrifice to human evil
      on the 100th anniversary of one little lineage's birth in
      America. A time to be born and, exactly a century later, a time
      to die."

      September 11's grand-scale contrast between good and evil,
      creation and destruction, bright beginnings and brutal endings
      reminds Mr. Gould that while single acts of cruelty and hate
      make the headlines and the history books, "the ordinary human
      decency of a billion acts of kindness, done by millions of good
      people, sets a far more powerful counterweight, albeit invisible
      for lack of comparable 'news value.'"

      The time for public recognition of ordinary acts of generosity
      and selflessness is long overdue, Mr. Gould writes emphatically:
      "We have a duty, almost a holy responsibility, to record and
      honor the victorious weight of these innumerable little
      kindnesses ... from an entire planet -- the acts that must be
      recorded to reaffirm the overwhelming weight of human decency."

      The article is not available online, but more information about
      the journal may be found at 
      http://lazurus.antioch.edu/review/home.html
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      Copyright (c) 2002 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.

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