Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

FW: 1/15/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

Expand Messages
  • Popplestone, Ann
    ... From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@chronicle.com] Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 5:00 AM To: Chronicle Daily Report Subject: 1/15/2002 Daily Report from
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 15, 2002
      FW: 1/15/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education

      -----Original Message-----
      From: The Chronicle [mailto:daily@...]
      Sent: Tuesday, January 15, 2002 5:00 AM
      To: Chronicle Daily Report
      Subject: 1/15/2002 Daily Report from The Chronicle of Higher Education


      ACADEME TODAY: The Chronicle of Higher Education's
      Daily Report for subscribers
      ______________________________________________________________

      Good day!

      Here are news bulletins from The Chronicle of Higher Education
      for Tuesday, January 15.

      *  [snip]
      _________________________________________________________________

      DISTANCE EDUCATION

      *  BATTERY-POWERED TWO-WAY RADIOS are bringing distance
         education to a rural village in the Philippines, despite
         typhoons, translation problems, and skinny pigs.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/free/2002/01/2002011501u.htm


      [snip]


      ALSO ON THE CHRONICLE'S WORLD WIDE WEB SITE

      NEW GRANT COMPETITIONS: Grants for research on human genetic
      variation.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/daily/2002/01/2002011501g.htm

      TODAY'S GUIDE TO WEBCASTS AND LIVE DISCUSSIONS: Globalization,
      women in the Middle East, and more.
         --> SEE http://chronicle.com/events

      [snip]

      _________________________________________________________________

      MAGAZINES & JOURNALS
      A glance at the January/February issue of "Foreign Policy":
      A fundamentalism primer

      R. Scott Appleby, a professor of history at the University of
      Notre Dame, and Martin E. Marty, a professor of early Christian
      history at the University of Chicago, have assembled a primer on
      religious fundamentalism for the nonfundamentalist.

      Mr. Appleby and Mr. Marty take on common misconceptions about
      fundamentalism in a variety of religions by debunking
      stereotypes.  For example, they assert that fundamentalists are
      not literalists, but actually espouse "new" (that is, a few
      hundred years old) theological concepts in which to ground their
      ideology. They also point out that fundamentalists do not oppose
      change; on the contrary, they're all for change -- but only the
      kind of change that they like. The two professors also rebut
      assumptions that fundamentalism causes violence, that
      fundamentalism attracts only the poor, and that fundamentalism
      is based on cults of personality.

      The authors conclude that fundamentalism does not cling to a
      sinking ship of orthodoxy; instead, "what fundamentalists
      everywhere have in common is the ability to craft their messages
      to fit the times."

      This article is not available online, but information about the
      journal can be found at http://www.foreignpolicy.com
      _________________________________________________________________

      You'll find The Chronicle's home page at:

                      http://chronicle.com
      _________________________________________________________________

      If you want to change the address at which you receive this
      e-mail message, change which messages you receive, change
      your login name or password, or make other changes in your
      account information, you can do so online at:
                      http://chronicle.com/services

      If you have other problems or questions, please send a message
      to:
                      help@...
      _________________________________________________________________

      Copyright (c) 2002 The Chronicle of Higher Education, Inc.

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.