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Re: [The Running Barefoot] Re: Zola Budd-Pieterse on the limits of Barefoot Running

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  • Condalicia Eutsler
    Just because it s vegan doesn t make it healthy that s why a lot of Vegan Doctors are saying Healthy vegan eating instead of just vegan.
    Message 1 of 63 , May 3, 2012
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      Just because it's vegan doesn't make it healthy that's why a lot of Vegan Doctors are saying Healthy vegan eating instead of just vegan.


      From: Gordon <gajslk@...>
      To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, May 3, 2012 7:09 AM
      Subject: [The Running Barefoot] Re: Zola Budd-Pieterse on the limits of Barefoot Running

       
      The problem is one of definition. For example, most donuts are vegan. Flour, sugar, and vegetable oil. No harm, no foul, right? How could they possibly be bad for you? They're not only vegetarian, they're vegan! LOL

      Gordon

      --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Doug Sims <wdsims63@...> wrote:
      >
      > "> Good point. By weight, I'm a near-vegetarian. LOL"
      >
      > Exactly, and pretty much anyone that can say this (whether low carb,
      > paleo, vegetarian, or religious vegan) is going to be healthier than
      > the average American.
      >
      > By weight, most Americans are doughnuts (or sodas). ;)
      >
      > On Thu, May 3, 2012 at 9:35 AM, Gordon <gajslk@...> wrote:
      > > --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Doug Sims <wdsims63@> wrote:
      > >> That is only true by weight. Fat is the predominant caloric component of
      > >> human milk.
      > >
      > > Good point. By weight, I'm a near-vegetarian. LOL
      > >
      > > Gordo
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > <hr>
      > > DID YOU KNOW... you can post directly to <a href="http://therunningbarefoot.com/?page_id=1204">TheRunningBarefoot.com</a>?
      > >
      > > Life, itself, is a risk! And an adventure, if you take responsibility for your own choices! Seeking advice from people with experience, like on this discussion group, and RunningBarefoot.org, is wonderful! Still, it is very important to learn to pay attention and understand messages from your own body and your own feet (obviously easier when your feet are allowed to feel the ground you walk on). Each decision, to try or not to try, or continue, or not continue, any course of action, is SOLELY yours, as is the responsibility for the results from YOUR choices.
      > > Have fun!Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >



    • rdwhitaker2012
      I just saw a new word - Flexitarian - that I kind of like. Flexitarians are people who are vegetarian most of the time, but once in a while will consume an
      Message 63 of 63 , May 3, 2012
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        I just saw a new word - "Flexitarian" - that I kind of like. Flexitarians are people who are vegetarian most of the time, but once in a while will consume an animal protein. Kind of like rabbits.

        Ryan

        --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, "twc151home" <twc151home@...> wrote:
        >
        > Right you are, Gordon, and as I mentioned in the post that created an interesting series of responses, these things related to complex systems with multiple feedback loops, so there are rarely simple answers.
        >
        > I am not a big believer in a lot of what the medical community has to say about a lot of things, but the American College of Sports Medicine's position on interval training makes sense to me, especially considering the time constraints I often face in taking long runs. Lots of people in the shod and barefoot running communities have a focus on speed (which I have never had), and competitive running (which I have never had), making my comments perhaps even a bit more relevant for them, particularly if they regularly push for speed over long runs.
        >
        > What I can say is that if you are pressed for time, and want to be as fit as you can within time constraints, then interval training, combined with strength training (weights) and flexibility training (such as yoga, for example) seems to be the most effective combination.
        >
        > I love long, slow runs. But using a heart monitor, I have discovered that my cardiovascular metrics have improved with intervals and plateau without them. My max heart rates are higher and my recovery times are measurably shorter when I do intervals, as compared to long slow runs. I am almost 60. I have been running since 1974. I have had to push the settings on my heart rate monitor from the "age 45" setting down to the "age 35" setting, and do intervals from 65% of max to 90% of max, with a high rate of 171 during a typical workout. This has shown a huge improvement since I started intervals a couple of years ago. Plus, it only takes me about 19 minutes to do an interval workout--a 2.5 minutes less than it used to. If I wanted to take a nice run, I'm barely getting going 10 minutes out and think nothing of running a couple of hours at a nice, slow pace.
        >
        > As they say, it's only a sample of one, but that sample of one (me) was informed by others who have done way more rigorous investigation into this stuff.
        >
        > As to the "logical positivist" label...well, it is certainly one part of my world view. That which can be measured yields a lot of interesting knowledge about the empirical side of reality, and the effects of such empirically-focused assessments have real implications at our scale and as seen through our biological lens.
        >
        > However, the non-empirical, which, by definition cannot be measured, also seems to have profound implications for humans. I do not mean to diminish either the possibility or the potentially real impact on humans of such non-empirical phenomena--it's just that these are things that do not yield to measurement by definition. And, of course, at the quantum and the hyper-macro scales, all bets are off when it comes to empirical measurement. At those scales, who the hell knows if it's a wave or a particle?
        >
        > Tim
        >
        > --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, "Gordon" <gajslk@> wrote:
        > >
        > > --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, "twc151home" <twc151home@> wrote:
        > > > I think the evidence shows that interval training actually does a lot more to maintain and improve cardiovascular health than does a chronic cardio practice.
        > >
        > > You might want to revisit the evidence. As long as your long runs are slow enough, you're good. You're right that many do their longer runs too fast for optimum adaptation. Those same people tend to do their speedwork too slowly too. You really want to stay out of the no man's land between easy pace and full on sprint. There's a ton of good stuff on Steve's blog. He hasn't been real active since getting a job(coaching Salazar), but the archives are chock full of solid science based posts.
        > >
        > > http://www.scienceofrunning.com/
        > >
        > > Gordon
        > >
        >
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