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RE: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs

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  • ross alloway
    Well, it depends what running I can get. I m recovering from a (non-running related) cut on my foot, so I m slowly going back up to higher mileage. For a
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 21, 2012
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      Well, it depends what running I can get. I'm recovering from a (non-running related) cut on my foot, so I'm slowly going back up to higher mileage. For a couple months last summer, coming off of a long build up, I got a long run in every day, which was really great. I felt so strong that I could have really pushed my limits. But, recently, I haven't had an opportunity to run more than 4x a week, maybe around 25 miles total. 5x a week is very achievable, and if there is any advice I could offer, it would be to finish every run feeling like your feet are strong, and you could do more if you wanted. At least this is good for the very beginning. With a foundation like that, you can build up and experiment with longer runs, and have a good sense of what you are capable of. Its a good way to find your limits without hurting your feet.

      Hope this is useful

      Ross


      To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
      From: zuckerbraun@...
      Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 20:33:34 +0000
      Subject: Re: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs

       

      nice response. i'm considering running 5x week, as an experiment, along the lines you mentioned, i.e. relax, enjoy, listen to your feet. what has been your experience with daily running?

      --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, ross alloway <rossalloway@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > In my opinion, not at all. I think the human body is capable of a lot more than we give it credit for, and many of these training regimes are based on 5-a-day vegetable/fruit science (a scheme that started in an advertising agency, not in a laboratory). Some of it is actually well researched, and valid for training, but unless I saw the clear science, I would hesitate to set my limits by it. Test yourself, would be my suggestion. In the space of a few weekends, I went from a 7 mile run, to a 14, to over 30 (I found my limit at that, by the way), which was way beyond my weekly mileage. I also think this "how many miles you run a week" stuff is sensible for competitors, but I prefer to listen to my body. If I'm too tired or the weather is awful, I take a break and go when it feels good. In fact, I believe listening to your own body is one of the best training programs you can have. Just plowing through is a recipe for frustration (and injury). I did that for a number of years with shoes, and got nowhere. Taking them off has given me a new respect for the signals I am getting every time I step outside for a run. If it feels good, do it. If it doesn't, don't. Simple.
      >
      > Best,
      >
      > Ross
      >
      > To: runningbarefoot@yahoogroups.com
      > CC: runningbarefoot@yahoogroups.com
      > From: dan@...
      > Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 09:59:56 -0500
      > Subject: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs [1 Attachment]
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      > [Attachment(s) from dan@... included below]
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      > I've read advice (from the conventional running world) about the
      >
      > relative length of long vs. short runs. Some say the longest run
      >
      > should be no longer than 1/2 your weekly mileage. Others say a long
      >
      > run should be no more than twice or three times the length of some
      >
      > other run. I don't know if there's any meaningful origin to these
      >
      > ideas.
      >
      >
      >
      > My typical running week includes three runs of 3 to 4 miles and a
      >
      > weekend run of 9 miles. Occasionally my weekend run is longer. Last
      >
      > weekend I happily ran 12.5 miles and felt only mild soreness the next
      >
      > morning. I enjoy the long run the most and I'd like to run further if
      >
      > possible. But I don't have the time during the weekdays to increase
      >
      > the length or number of my short runs.
      >
      >
      >
      > Is it risky for me to increase the length of my long run if I don't
      >
      > increase the length of the others? Thanks for your opinions.
      >


    • Tracy E. Longacre
      Lots of folks who do ultramarathons (the normal people) do massively long runs on the weekends and short runs during the week. Like 3-4-6 miles a couple of
      Message 2 of 28 , Feb 22, 2012
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        Lots of folks who do ultramarathons (the normal people) do massively long runs on the weekends and short runs during the week. Like 3-4-6 miles a couple of times during the week and then 10 mi Saturday and 30 mi Sunday. Or even nothing during the week and just back to back long runs on the weekends. So, I think this is something that can definitely work. But Ross had the perfect answer – test it out yourself on your body.

         

        Re: the other question about daily runs. So, somehow I jumped in to this 120-day challenge. It started as 30, which didn’t seem so intimidating, but then it ramped up very quickly. . . At any rate, I went from 2-3 runs per week to running, something, every single day. Today was Day 16 and so far, so good. In fact, I think it’s even better for me because my weekly mileage is up where I’d like it to be (30-35mi) and if I feel tired on any given day, I just do a couple of miles. Shortest run so far was 1.7mi I think. Previously I would have thought “just 2 miles” wasn’t worth it. But for me, I think it really helps keep the engine “greased”. . .

         

           Tracy E. Longacre

           from Katima Mulilo, Namibia

         

           just another child of God Blog: http://tlongacre.wordpress.com

           Run Blog:  http://revruns.blogspot.com

           Photos: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tlongacre/

         

                  ———-O0ooo—
                  ———–(——)—
                  ————)–-/—-
                 ————(_/-
                  —-ooo0O—-
                  —-(——)—-
                  —–\-–(–
                  ——\_)-

         

        From: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com [mailto:RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of ross alloway
        Sent: 22 February 2012 02:55
        To: runningbarefoot@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: RE: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs

         

         

        Well, it depends what running I can get. I'm recovering from a (non-running related) cut on my foot, so I'm slowly going back up to higher mileage. For a couple months last summer, coming off of a long build up, I got a long run in every day, which was really great. I felt so strong that I could have really pushed my limits. But, recently, I haven't had an opportunity to run more than 4x a week, maybe around 25 miles total. 5x a week is very achievable, and if there is any advice I could offer, it would be to finish every run feeling like your feet are strong, and you could do more if you wanted. At least this is good for the very beginning. With a foundation like that, you can build up and experiment with longer runs, and have a good sense of what you are capable of. Its a good way to find your limits without hurting your feet.

        Hope this is useful

        Ross


        To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
        From: zuckerbraun@...
        Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 20:33:34 +0000
        Subject: Re: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs

         


        nice response. i'm considering running 5x week, as an experiment, along the lines you mentioned, i.e. relax, enjoy, listen to your feet. what has been your experience with daily running?

        --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, ross alloway <rossalloway@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > In my opinion, not at all. I think the human body is capable of a lot more than we give it credit for, and many of these training regimes are based on 5-a-day vegetable/fruit science (a scheme that started in an advertising agency, not in a laboratory). Some of it is actually well researched, and valid for training, but unless I saw the clear science, I would hesitate to set my limits by it. Test yourself, would be my suggestion. In the space of a few weekends, I went from a 7 mile run, to a 14, to over 30 (I found my limit at that, by the way), which was way beyond my weekly mileage. I also think this "how many miles you run a week" stuff is sensible for competitors, but I prefer to listen to my body. If I'm too tired or the weather is awful, I take a break and go when it feels good. In fact, I believe listening to your own body is one of the best training programs you can have. Just plowing through is a recipe for frustration (and injury). I did that for a number of years with shoes, and got nowhere. Taking them off has given me a new respect for the signals I am getting every time I step outside for a run. If it feels good, do it. If it doesn't, don't. Simple.
        >
        > Best,
        >
        > Ross
        >
        > To: runningbarefoot@yahoogroups.com
        > CC: runningbarefoot@yahoogroups.com
        > From: dan@...
        > Date: Tue, 21 Feb 2012 09:59:56 -0500
        > Subject: [The Running Barefoot] Long vs. short runs [1 Attachment]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > [Attachment(s) from dan@... included below]
        >
        >
        > I've read advice (from the conventional running world) about the
        >
        > relative length of long vs. short runs. Some say the longest run
        >
        > should be no longer than 1/2 your weekly mileage. Others say a long
        >
        > run should be no more than twice or three times the length of some
        >
        > other run. I don't know if there's any meaningful origin to these
        >
        > ideas.
        >
        >
        >
        > My typical running week includes three runs of 3 to 4 miles and a
        >
        > weekend run of 9 miles. Occasionally my weekend run is longer. Last
        >
        > weekend I happily ran 12.5 miles and felt only mild soreness the next
        >
        > morning. I enjoy the long run the most and I'd like to run further if
        >
        > possible. But I don't have the time during the weekdays to increase
        >
        > the length or number of my short runs.
        >
        >
        >
        > Is it risky for me to increase the length of my long run if I don't
        >
        > increase the length of the others? Thanks for your opinions.
        >

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