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Re: running and singing

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  • Billy
    Nothing can help me keep that 180 cadence going like a good sticky song like Gimme A Break! Gimme A Break! Break me off a piece-a-that Kit Kat bar. or So rick
    Message 1 of 20 , Jul 31, 2010
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      Nothing can help me keep that 180 cadence going like a good sticky song like

      Gimme A Break! Gimme A Break! Break me off a piece-a-that Kit Kat bar.

      or

      So rick so think no room for a stick what would you doooooo for a KLONDIKE BAR

      or

      Honey Comb's big, YEAH YEAH YEAH, it's not small, NO NO NO.

      Billy
    • Anthony Marendy
      I always try and find a song in either 3/4 or 6/8 - this way the first beat (which you tend to accent subconsciously) alternates between my left and right
      Message 2 of 20 , Aug 1, 2010
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        I always try and find a song in either 3/4 or 6/8 - this way the first beat (which you tend to accent subconsciously) alternates between my left and right foot.  

        Anthony.

        On 31/07/2010 7:06 AM, Nicholas Leippe wrote:  

        On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 2:37 PM, Ryan W <ardydub@...> wrote:
        > LOL - I also 'sing' to myself while running, but inside my head, not vocally. One I like is the Hallelujah Chorus ("Forrr unto us a Child is giv-en!") I have some other songs I like to use from church, children's songs. How about Twinkle Twinkle?

        Only if you want to promote insanity :)
        Guess Twinkle Twinkle is better than "It's a small world" though. hah.


      • Ryan W
        Whatever you do, do NOT sing the Hokey-Pokey song while running! It will mess havoc with your form! You put your right foot in,You put your right foot out,You
        Message 3 of 20 , Aug 2, 2010
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          Whatever you do, do NOT sing the Hokey-Pokey song while running! It will mess havoc with your form!
          "You put your right foot in,You put your right foot out,You put your right foot in, And you shake it all about."
          I about fell over at least five times last Saturday.

          Ryan

          --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Marendy <amarendy@...> wrote:
          >
          > I always try and find a song in either 3/4 or 6/8 - this way the first
          > beat (which you tend to accent subconsciously) alternates between my
          > left and right foot.
          >
          > Anthony.
          >
          > On 31/07/2010 7:06 AM, Nicholas Leippe wrote:
          > >
          > > On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 2:37 PM, Ryan W <ardydub@...
          > > <mailto:ardydub%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
          > > > LOL - I also 'sing' to myself while running, but inside my head, not
          > > vocally. One I like is the Hallelujah Chorus ("Forrr unto us a Child
          > > is giv-en!") I have some other songs I like to use from church,
          > > children's songs. How about Twinkle Twinkle?
          > >
          > > Only if you want to promote insanity :)
          > > Guess Twinkle Twinkle is better than "It's a small world" though. hah.
          > >
          > >
          >
        • twc151home
          I don t sing while I run, or listen to my ipod. The case for song is strong, though, for at least two reasons: 1) As many have noted in this thread, the
          Message 4 of 20 , Aug 2, 2010
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            I don't sing while I run, or listen to my ipod. The case for song is strong, though, for at least two reasons:

            1) As many have noted in this thread, the rhythms of song are a good way to coordinate running activity and maintain the kind of high cadence we barefoot runners like to maintain for good form.

            2) Nut another less obvious reason why singing helps running is that song is highly trance-inductive. That's one of several reasons why religious ceremonies have always included it. Trance induction, I am convinced, is a large part of why runners "get lost in time" when they run.

            As I have mentioned before, I use my breathing rhythm together with footfalls to create an integrated trance-rhythm-cadence experience. Anthony, it seems you have found songs in 3/4 or 6/8 do get to the same alternating foot pattern I like so much.

            I like it when I synch this alternating foot pattern together with my aerobic experience that usually kicks in somewhere between 4 and 10 tenths of a mile into the run, depending on the shape I'm in. If I've run 40-50 miles that week, then it might take a mile and a half to achieve. If I've not run for a couple of weeks (however rare that is) then it might only take 4 tenths.

            Tim

            --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Marendy <amarendy@...> wrote:
            >
            > I always try and find a song in either 3/4 or 6/8 - this way the first
            > beat (which you tend to accent subconsciously) alternates between my
            > left and right foot.
            >
            > Anthony.
            >
            > On 31/07/2010 7:06 AM, Nicholas Leippe wrote:
            > >
            > > On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 2:37 PM, Ryan W <ardydub@...
            > > <mailto:ardydub%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
            > > > LOL - I also 'sing' to myself while running, but inside my head, not
            > > vocally. One I like is the Hallelujah Chorus ("Forrr unto us a Child
            > > is giv-en!") I have some other songs I like to use from church,
            > > children's songs. How about Twinkle Twinkle?
            > >
            > > Only if you want to promote insanity :)
            > > Guess Twinkle Twinkle is better than "It's a small world" though. hah.
            > >
            > >
            >
          • Kelly Mahoney
            Nor do I sing or listen to music when running, but when I get bored of NPR while commuting to work, jams are a must. One of my favorites to get me going is
            Message 5 of 20 , Aug 2, 2010
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              Nor do I sing or listen to music when running, but when I get bored of NPR while commuting to work, jams are a must. One of my favorites to get me going is Cake's "The Distance":
               
              Reluctantly crouched at the starting line,
              engines pumping and thumping in time.
              the green light flashes, the flags go up.
              churning and burning, they yearn for the cup.
              they deftly maneuver and muscle for rank,
              fuel burning fast on an empty tank.
              reckless and wild, they pour through the turns.
              their prowess is potent and secretly stern.
              as they speed through the finish, the flags go down.
              the fans get up and they get out of town.
              the arena is empty except for one man,
              still driving and striving as fast as he can.
              the sun has gone down and the moon has come up,
              and long ago somebody left with the cup.
              but he's driving and striving and hugging the turns.
              and thinking of someone for whom he still burns.

              he's going the distance.
              he's going for speed.
              she's all alone
              all alone in her time of need.
              because he's racing and pacing and plotting the course,
              he's fighting and biting and riding on his horse,
              he's going the distance.


              no trophy, no flowers, no flashbulbs, no wine,
              he's haunted by something he cannot define.
              bowel-shaking earthquakes of doubt and remorse,
              assail him, impale him with monster-truck force.
              in his mind, he's still driving, still making the grade.
              she's hoping in time that her memories will fade.
              cause he's racing and pacing and plotting the course,
              he's fighting and biting and riding on his horse.
              the sun has gone down and the moon has come up,
              and long ago somebody left with the cup.
              but he's striving and driving and hugging the turns.
              and thinking of someone for whom he still burns.

              cause he's going the distance.
              he's going for speed.
              she's all alone
              all alone in her time of need.
              because he's racing and pacing and plotting the course,
              he's fighting and biting and riding on his horse.
              he's racing and pacing and plotting the course,
              he's fighting and biting and riding on his horse.
              he's going the distance.
              he's going for speed.
              he's going the distance.  


              From: twc151home <twc151home@...>
              To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Mon, August 2, 2010 2:59:14 PM
              Subject: [The Running Barefoot] Re: running and singing

               

              I don't sing while I run, or listen to my ipod. The case for song is strong, though, for at least two reasons:

              1) As many have noted in this thread, the rhythms of song are a good way to coordinate running activity and maintain the kind of high cadence we barefoot runners like to maintain for good form.

              2) Nut another less obvious reason why singing helps running is that song is highly trance-inductive. That's one of several reasons why religious ceremonies have always included it. Trance induction, I am convinced, is a large part of why runners "get lost in time" when they run.

              As I have mentioned before, I use my breathing rhythm together with footfalls to create an integrated trance-rhythm-cadence experience. Anthony, it seems you have found songs in 3/4 or 6/8 do get to the same alternating foot pattern I like so much.

              I like it when I synch this alternating foot pattern together with my aerobic experience that usually kicks in somewhere between 4 and 10 tenths of a mile into the run, depending on the shape I'm in. If I've run 40-50 miles that week, then it might take a mile and a half to achieve. If I've not run for a couple of weeks (however rare that is) then it might only take 4 tenths.

              Tim

              --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Marendy <amarendy@...> wrote:
              >
              > I always try and find a song in either 3/4 or 6/8 - this way the first
              > beat (which you tend to accent subconsciously) alternates between my
              > left and right foot.
              >
              > Anthony.
              >
              > On 31/07/2010 7:06 AM, Nicholas Leippe wrote:
              > >
              > > On Fri, Jul 30, 2010 at 2:37 PM, Ryan W <ardydub@...
              > > <mailto:ardydub%40yahoo.com>> wrote:
              > > > LOL - I also 'sing' to myself while running, but inside my head, not
              > > vocally. One I like is the Hallelujah Chorus ("Forrr unto us a Child
              > > is giv-en!") I have some other songs I like to use from church,
              > > children's songs. How about Twinkle Twinkle?
              > >
              > > Only if you want to promote insanity :)
              > > Guess Twinkle Twinkle is better than "It's a small world" though. hah.
              > >
              > >
              >


            • mightymait
              That Cake song is a real toe-tapper. One of my most cherished memories from college is running around the Quad with the track team naked (except for
              Message 6 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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                That Cake song is a real toe-tapper.

                One of my most cherished memories from college is running around the Quad with the track team naked (except for shoes--darn it!!) at midnight on the first day of practice singing the school fight song at the top of our lungs. The upperclassmen surprised us after a mysterious summons and prefaced the command to strip with introductory remarks about the classical Greek origins of our sport and a supposed (but fabricated) long history of performing this ritual.

                "Roar, Lions, Roar
                And wake the echoes of the Hudson Valley
                Fight on for victory ever more
                While the sons of Knickerbocker rally 'round
                Columbia
                Columbia
                Shouting her name forever
                Roar, Lions, Roar
                For Alma Mater on the Hudson Shore"

                Well, I took a month or so sabbatical from reading every single post to the newsgroup and just started reading again (though I may release myself from the compulsion to read *every* word).

                First, I wanted to offer my congratulations to Efrem for a stellar SF Marathon performance!! I'm only a year younger than you, but light-years behind in my training. Thanks for setting the bar high for us to try to follow.

                On a run the week before last, my form broke for a moment and I kicked my big toe against a slight bump in the road, peeling back a layer of skin. Though I was bleeding, I chose to keep running. However, I must have been favoring my right foot (the one with the injured toe) because I found my left calf cramping up after a mile or so. I limped through the rest of the 5 mile run, walking a fair bit on the way back.

                I must have torn the muscle, because it was quite sore for the next few days and is still a little tender. Since then, I've done some bike riding, some shorter runs, and some barefoot hikes (I took my eldest daughter for an overnight camping trip to Big Basin in the Santa Cruz mountains). I'm planning to head out in a few minutes and see what a gentle 3 miles feels like.

                --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, Kelly Mahoney <kellymahoney@...> wrote:
                >
                > Nor do I sing or listen to music when running, but when I get bored of NPR while
                > commuting to work, jams are a must. One of my favorites to get me going is
                > Cake's "The Distance":
              • Barefoot Ken Bob Saxton
                I only sing when I feel like singing - and can think of something worth singing. Mostly I try to enjoy the music that my environment provides. And remember not
                Message 7 of 20 , Aug 3, 2010
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                  I only sing when I feel like singing - and can think of something worth singing. Mostly I try to enjoy the music that my environment provides.

                  And remember not to push your foot into the ground on the beat. Lift on the beat. You'll be running more gently, and it's easier to use a faster cadence when focusing on the lift, because when we push, we launch our body into the air, and it takes a certain amount of time for the body to decelerate, peak, and return to the ground, which severely limits how fast we can take each step.

                  Have fun,
                  -barefoot ken bob

                  --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, chua w.tiong <cwtjones@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >
                  > usually i only sing when i am very tired :-)
                  >
                  > and now i don't sing anymore, i chant heart sutra, whenever i feel really hard to move on. :-)
                  >
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