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Re: Intro and stuff

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  • Ken Saxton
    ... braking ... the ... I ... I ran barefoot for ten years on asphalt and other surfaces without heel problems, and without really thinking about my landing
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 9, 2001
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      --- In RunningBarefoot@y..., chads@m... wrote:
      > One question - do all the barefoot runners here successfully land
      > ball-heel-ball? Maybe my form will progress, but when I land ball
      > first, my foot is slightly in front of my body and creates a
      braking
      > action. However, when I land flat-footed on the ball and heel at
      the
      > same time, I feel much more efficient and run faster. Like I said,
      > maybe my barefoot form will improve as I do it more. But even now,
      > my heels do not get any more sore than other parts of my feet when
      I
      > run barefoot, so I don't think I am putting too much stress on my
      > heels.

      I ran barefoot for ten years on asphalt and other surfaces without
      heel problems, and without really thinking about my landing
      technique. Then I started running some rocky trails and hitting hard
      pointy rocks with my heels. Soon, I was staying off my heels, and
      this was still long before I knew about ball/heel/ball.

      Essentially, I guess your feet will teach you how to land. And that
      may change as you try new surfaces, or new distances, or even
      different speeds.

      Charley Robbins says that he lands pretty much flat-footed. He has
      run barefoot in road races for more than 65 years without any
      significant injury.

      It is probably more important that the foot land under the body, so
      that you aren't braking, than to try to stretch the foot out in an
      attempt to land on the ball of the foot. However, you probably won't
      reach your full potential until you find your best running technique.
      And it may or may not be the same as everyone else uses. Before
      Fosbury, there was no Fosbury flop, and no one suspected that high
      jumping with your back to the jump could be more efficient. Now that
      is the technique everyone else uses in the high jump.

      -ken
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