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RE: [RunningBarefoot] cold weather

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  • Rechtschaffen, Glenn
    I lived in Pennsylvania for a year and had to deal with cold weather. My solution was to run in beach shoes (mesh type) and slip them off whenever the surface
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 13, 2002
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      I lived in Pennsylvania for a year and had to deal with cold weather.  My solution was to run in beach shoes (mesh type) and slip them off whenever the surface allowed.  Unless there's snow on the ground, you'd be surprised how resilient your feet are, i.e., other parts of me got alot colder.  Good luck.
       
      Glenn
      -----Original Message-----
      From: mariachiestrellas [mailto:mariachiestrella@...]
      Sent: Thursday, 14 November 2002 9:23 a.m.
      To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [RunningBarefoot] cold weather

      I live in Virginia and it can get pretty cold/icy/wet and darn nasty
      in the winter.  Last winter I ran barefoot indoors on my treadmill. 
      Unfortunately, that is only good for a couple of miles as it's boring
      and the belt can get pretty hot not to mention the interruptions from
      the family and pets.  So far this November, I've been able to run
      outdoors a number times because it's been nice outside, but that's
      bound to end soon.  There are only one or two indoor tracks in the
      area and either the fee is exorbitant or the track is tiny (1/10
      mile). I've never run on a cold surface.  Is it possible?  I'm
      wondering what are my options for getting in good runs during cold
      months.  Any recommendations?

      Judy B.


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    • Chris Runyan
      Judy, I ve spent quite a bit of time with my feet in the cold and basically the more you go out the better they can handle it. Down to about 20 degrees F is
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 13, 2002
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        Judy,

        I've spent quite a bit of time with my feet in the cold and
        basically the more you go out the better they can handle it.
        Down to about 20 degrees F is pretty safe as you don't want to
        get frostbite - make sure you have feeling in your toes and
        soles (stop and check them once in a while). If snow or ice is
        melting you know the ground is at least 32 degrees and your feet
        won't freeze. When it's solid frozen it will be a lot harder to
        go barefoot. Dress warmer on your upper body. Your feet will
        adapt by adding fat to your soles if you do it enough. Portland
        winters are above freezing typically so it's a bit easier here
        although it's always wet and around 40 degrees. I walked
        several miles in melting snow last winter and took some walks in
        Colorado on frozen ground which I'll admit was difficult - not
        so much that my feet hurt, but I could tell it took a lot of
        heat from my body. Helps that I walk around barefoot in winter
        too, because it's the amount of exposure that determines how
        much your body will adapt. Just another challenge for your
        feet. Let us know how it goes for you - there aren't many
        people going barefoot in the cold.

        Chris

        --- mariachiestrellas <mariachiestrella@...> wrote:
        > I live in Virginia and it can get pretty cold/icy/wet and darn
        > nasty
        > in the winter. Last winter I ran barefoot indoors on my
        > treadmill.
        > Unfortunately, that is only good for a couple of miles as it's
        > boring
        > and the belt can get pretty hot not to mention the
        > interruptions from
        > the family and pets. So far this November, I've been able to
        > run
        > outdoors a number times because it's been nice outside, but
        > that's
        > bound to end soon. There are only one or two indoor tracks in
        > the
        > area and either the fee is exorbitant or the track is tiny
        > (1/10
        > mile). I've never run on a cold surface. Is it possible? I'm
        >
        > wondering what are my options for getting in good runs during
        > cold
        > months. Any recommendations?
        >
        > Judy B.
        >
        >


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      • bfsailor
        ... Hi Judy, I agree with Chris that the more time you spend in the cold the more you adapt to it. I ve been running barefoot for about two years now in Erie,
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 14, 2002
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          >I've never run on a cold surface. Is it possible? I'm
          > wondering what are my options for getting in good runs during cold
          > months. Any recommendations?
          >
          > Judy B.

          Hi Judy,

          I agree with Chris that the more time you spend in the cold the more
          you adapt to it. I've been running barefoot for about two years now
          in Erie, Pennsylvania, and it gets pretty cold here! In fact, I've
          been running the last few weeks with temps in the low 40's and high
          30's. I ran pretty regularly last winter, and found that I could
          easily handle temps. down to 25 degrees on dry pavement. The first
          mile or so feels pretty cold, but once the blood gets pumping to your
          feet it actually feels pretty good. Running in snow is much tougher
          because it conducts heat away from your body much faster than dry
          ground does, plus wet feet are softer and more prone to injury and
          blisters. My rule of thumb is if the ground is dry and it's above 20
          degrees, I'll run. I'm always careful to not get too far from home
          though; if I run in my neighborhood I have a route that allows me to
          do about five miles without ever being more than half a mile from
          home, and if I go to the park I run 1 mile loops with my car parked
          near the middle. That way if I twist an ankle or something I don't
          have too far to walk barefoot. Running in the cold is one thing; your
          feet get much colder walking. My advice is to just keep runnng as the
          weather gets colder and you'll get used to it, but remember the first
          rule of barefoot running - listen to your feet. If they're
          uncomfortable, or starting to lose feeling, STOP and warm them up. Be
          careful and most of all, enjoy! (An added bonus is the astonished
          looks you get from other runners you pass. I ran a 10K last
          Thanksgiving day and it was about 39 degrees at race time; made for
          lots of interesting comments along the way!)Have fun and keep us
          posted.

          Tom Madura
          Erie, PA
        • salexrose
          Judy: I too live in Va, and started the barefoot thing last jan./feb., limiting myself to the not uncommon sunny low 50 s mid-afternoon weekend runs, mostly on
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 14, 2002
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            Judy:
            I too live in Va, and started the barefoot thing last jan./feb.,
            limiting myself to the not uncommon sunny low 50's mid-afternoon
            weekend runs, mostly on outdoor track. At that point my feet needed
            significant rest/healing periods, so running only on the weekend was
            fine.
            Scott
          • Judy Benavides
            That s what I ve been doing lately, barefoot on the track during the weekends. I ve been using shoes during the middle of the week though because I go out a
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 14, 2002
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              That's what I've been doing lately, barefoot on the track during the
              weekends. I've been using shoes during the middle of the week though
              because I go out a 5:30 a.m and it's dark and tons of wet leaves and acorns
              are on the ground.

              Judy



              >From: "salexrose" <scott.rose@...>
              >Reply-To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
              >To: RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [RunningBarefoot] Re: cold weather
              >Date: Thu, 14 Nov 2002 15:14:38 -0000
              >
              >Judy:
              >I too live in Va, and started the barefoot thing last jan./feb.,
              >limiting myself to the not uncommon sunny low 50's mid-afternoon
              >weekend runs, mostly on outdoor track. At that point my feet needed
              >significant rest/healing periods, so running only on the weekend was
              >fine.
              >Scott
              >


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            • Ken Saxton
              Doc Charley Robbins has been running barefoot throughout the year in Connecticut since he was 15 years old in 1925 (except while doing his residency in
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 19, 2002
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                Doc Charley Robbins has been running barefoot throughout the year in
                Connecticut since he was 15 years old in 1925 (except while doing his
                residency in Chicago). I have an excerpt about running in cold
                weather from his book "Running with the Best Since 1936";
                http://www.runningbarefoot.org/Cold.html

                enjoy
                -ken

                --- In RunningBarefoot@y..., "mariachiestrellas"
                <mariachiestrella@h...> wrote:
                > I live in Virginia and it can get pretty cold/icy/wet and darn
                nasty
                > in the winter. Last winter I ran barefoot indoors on my
                treadmill.
                > Unfortunately, that is only good for a couple of miles as it's
                boring
                > and the belt can get pretty hot not to mention the interruptions
                from
                > the family and pets. So far this November, I've been able to run
                > outdoors a number times because it's been nice outside, but that's
                > bound to end soon. There are only one or two indoor tracks in the
                > area and either the fee is exorbitant or the track is tiny (1/10
                > mile). I've never run on a cold surface. Is it possible? I'm
                > wondering what are my options for getting in good runs during cold
                > months. Any recommendations?
                >
                > Judy B.
              • lilpolly90
                I am trying to peice together how human feet became so unadapted to cold weather. Obviously, if living barefoot is natural why does cold weather numb my feet
                Message 7 of 10 , Oct 27, 2004
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                  I am trying to peice together how human feet became so unadapted to
                  cold weather. Obviously, if living barefoot is natural why does cold
                  weather numb my feet and cause me to get hypothermic and brutal terms
                  of cronic insomnia?

                  My hypothesis is that we must rape our feet of the immunity to the
                  cold during our childhoods when we wore shoes constantly (remember
                  the average barefoot time a human spends in his life is when he is
                  sleeping, indoors, or in the shower.) Feet seem as though they get
                  sensitive to the cold more than any other body part. A normal person
                  would decide to leave his house without his gloves rather than his
                  shoes, because he would imagine his feet be very freezing in the dead
                  of the winter.

                  Maybe if I spent my entire early years barefoot my feet would be able
                  to adapt to winter walking. It is similar to wearing gloves your
                  entire lives. Imagine throughout your infancy you had to wear gloves
                  until you were about 17 years old (my current age) much like people
                  do with shoes. When you remove the gloves in the cold, after
                  previously wearing them for 17 years, your hands would become
                  extrememly cold? I think it is an abnormailty that feet are the most
                  precious things to protect from cold, and I think this evolves from
                  the constant harboring of feet when small.

                  Maybe if I spent my entire life up to 17 years old barefoot the cold
                  wouldnt effect my feet. A natural life would be considered living
                  barefoot 100% just as animals run barefoot in the winter and in the
                  snow. Maybe it is wise to hibernate in the winter just as we see in
                  nature?
                • Ken Bob Saxton
                  More on cold weather clothes; http://www.runningbarefoot.org/CharleyRobbinsScrapbook.shtml I agree with Charley s thoughts. Keep the body warm, and the body
                  Message 8 of 10 , Oct 27, 2004
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                    More on cold weather clothes;
                    http://www.runningbarefoot.org/CharleyRobbinsScrapbook.shtml

                    I agree with Charley's thoughts. Keep the body warm, and the body
                    will keep the extremities warm.

                    Some other random thoughts on humans and cold.

                    The human foot, itself, doesn't have a big problem with cold, at
                    least not down to freezing, as long as the foot is active. It is our
                    mind that has a problem with cold.

                    We have trained our bodies to be comfortable only in a very narrow
                    temperature range. Anything outside of normal room temperature, is
                    perceived as "uncomfortable", when it should be perceived as
                    stimulating.

                    Some humans are able to go barefoot in snow and extreme cold, without
                    severe negative consequences.

                    However, I believe that the basic human design, low body fat, sparse
                    hair, is better suited to a tropical, or near tropical climate.

                    Of course there is a lot of diversity among humans. Some are very
                    hairy, while others have large amounts of body fat (more body fat in
                    the past 20 years than ever before).

                    Hair seems to be the insulation of choice among other land mammals in
                    cold areas, which supports my premise that we simply aren't designed
                    for extremely cold climates. I know that I have a lot of facial hair,
                    but the hair on the rest of my body, and that of the female of our
                    species, is much less effective as insulation.

                    I think that high body fat in warm-blooded animals, is more suitable
                    for marine life, as it also aids in floatation. Well, that's also why
                    sharks historically never liked the taste of humans so much. Though
                    they may take an arm or leg before realizing you aren't a seal! Just
                    skin and bones, not enough fat to supply the energy the sharks need.
                    This distaste may change, as our population grows wider.

                    -barefoot ken bob

                    --- In RunningBarefoot@yahoogroups.com, "lilpolly90"
                    <runbarefoot1@v...> wrote:
                    >
                    > I am trying to peice together how human feet became so unadapted to
                    > cold weather. Obviously, if living barefoot is natural why does
                    cold
                    > weather numb my feet and cause me to get hypothermic and brutal
                    terms
                    > of cronic insomnia?
                  • michae legault
                    hey gang, last night i went to my track group, under the lights at a junior college. it was pretty cold, and while i was able to do the naked feet at a slow
                    Message 9 of 10 , Dec 1, 2004
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                      hey gang,
                      last night i went to my track group, under the lights
                      at a junior college. it was pretty cold, and while i
                      was able to do the naked feet at a slow pace, when we
                      began the track work i decided to put on my socks.
                      how i decide on socks, or naked is this:
                      are my foots cold and i'm equanimous with it, or
                      have i lost the balance of my mind ( tensing up,
                      panicking or some other state that that is
                      steamrollering into chaos).

                      sometimes running in the cold with equanimity.
                      michae



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