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Runner's and Triathlete's Web Digest - December 7, 2012

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  • Ken Parker
    A FREE WEEKLY E-ZINE OF MULTISPORT RELATED ARTICLES. The Runner s and Triathlete s Web Digest is a weekly e-zine dealing with the sports of running and
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 7, 2012
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      A FREE WEEKLY E-ZINE OF MULTISPORT RELATED ARTICLES.
      The Runner's and Triathlete's Web Digest is a weekly e-zine dealing with the sports of running and triathlon and general fitness and
      health issues. The opinions expressed in the articles referenced by the Digest are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily
      those of the Runner's Web. Visit the Runner's Web at http://www.runnersweb.com The site is updated multiple times daily. Check out
      our daily news, features, polls, trivia, bulletin boards and more.

      SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS: All of the revenue from our advertisers and affiliates goes to support clubs, athletes and clinics related
      to multisport and Canadian Olympians.

      1. Emilie's Run - The Emilie Mondor Memorial 5K Race for Women - Canada's Fastest Women's 5K.
      The 2013 race will be run on June 22nd.
      Sports 4 is providing cash prizing as follows:
      First Overall $1000, Second Overall $750, Third Overall $550, Fourth Overall $400, Fifth Overall $300
      First Masters (40 & over*) $500
      There are cash prizes for the following:
      New Race Record: $1000, New Masters (40 & over*) Record: $500, New 5 Year Age Category Age : $100
      *age as of Dec 31, 2013
      For more on the race visit the website
      at: http://www.emiliesrun.com.

      2. Road Runner Sports, the world's largest running store at:
      http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/click?lid=41000000010069822.

      3. Toronto Waterfront Marathon, date October 14, 2012
      The fastest men's and women's marathon on Canadian soil!
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/STWM_Transporter.html

      4. Goodlife Fitness Toronto Marathon - ~Online Registration is Now Open~
      Next year's race will be run on Sunday May 5, 2013
      http://www.torontomarathon.com/registration/online-registration.html

      5. Training Peaks
      The Runner's Web has partnered with Training Peaks to provide online
      coaching from experts such as Hal Higdon, Joel Friel and Matt
      Fitzgerald. Sign up at:
      https://home.trainingpeaks.com/create-account-personal-edition.aspx?af=RunnersWeb

      6. iRun Magazine
      iRun is Canada's highest-circulation and most popular running magazine. With a total distribution of 50,000 and more than 9,000
      subscribers, iRun is leading the market in the rapidly growing and highly desirable demographic of Canadian runners.
      iRun Magazine is a sponsor of Emilie's Run
      http://www.irun.ca/

      8. Canadian Running Magazine: Subscribe at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/CanadianRunner.html

      7. Olympic Physical Therapy and Foot Orthotics:
      Olympic Physical Therapy and Foot Orthotics was founded in May of 2000 by Don Levine, MSPT and Bert Reid, DPT, to provide outpatient
      physical therapy and sports medicine rehabilitation to the residents of Rhode Island and South Eastern Massachusetts. Consistently
      assessing the needs of our communities while striving to provide the highest level of care and customer service. This has allowed
      Olympic and its staff to thrive and earn accolades such as, in 2007, becoming the first recipient of the Small Business of the Year
      award from The Newport Chamber of Commerce
      http://olympicpt-ri.com

      8. Penticton Challenge Triathlon:
      Welcome to Challenge Penticton, the first time a Challenge event will be held in North America and the exclusive Challenge Family
      race in Canada.
      Challenge Penticton is the race of a lifetime and the perfect way to train, compete and vacation in paradise. Join athletes from all
      over the world for the 3.8 km swim, the 180 km cycle and the 42.2 km run. Wave starts allow for relay team entries, opening the
      long-distance triathlon experience to more athletes.
      We pay the tax! Challenge Penticton will offer more value to athletes for less: Individual registration fees have been set at $675
      CDN, including all taxes, while teams will pay $800. Professional triathletes will benefit from a prize purse of more than $60,000
      CDN that pays down to 10th place.
      Register now to join Penticton on Aug. 2013 as the B.C. city is welcomed into the Challenge Family fold.
      The race website is at:
      http://www.challenge-penticton.com

      9. Marathon Bahamas:
      Perfect ocean breezes, swaying palm trees, and miles of white, sandy beaches caressed by crystalline waters - could there be a
      better backdrop for a marathon? Held in historic Nassau, the Sunshine Insurance Race Weekend is the ideal international winter
      running event, and only a 30-minute flight from South Florida.
      Athletes from 25 countries and 37 states have flocked to the idyllic island capital for what has become the signature endurance
      event of the country. The flat, fast 26.2-mile course features the best focal points of the Bahamas with an oceanfront start and
      finish, stunning cityscapes, historic charm, and miles of unobstructed views of aquamarine water.
      Kicking off at Junkaboo Beach, marathoners will weave through quaint downtown Nassau, lined with historic buildings, the glitz and
      glam of Paradise Island, and then hug the northern Shores of Cable Beach before crossing the finish line at Arawak Cay.
      All participants receive a technical race shirt, runner swag bag, commemorative finisher medal, and access to an awesome post-race
      beach party where fatigued finishers can load up on great food, cold beer, and music.
      Website: http://marathonbahamas.com

      ASSOCIATIONS:
      The Runner's Web is a member of Running USA, The National Professional
      Organization for the Running Industry.
      http://www.runningusa.org/

      NEW SUBSCRIBERS: Check the "New Subscribers' note at the bottom of the
      newsletter

      Check out our RSS auto-feeds page for automated news updates:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_auto_feeds.html

      Webmasters: Get our Syndicated headlines for your site.
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_getRSS.html
      The Runner's and Triathlete's Web Digest is available
      through an RSS feed for myYahoo at:
      http://e.my.yahoo.com/config/cstore?.opt=content&.url=http%3a//rss.groups.yahoo.com/group/RunnersWeb/rss
      [Long URL] The Digest is also available through other RSS Readers on request.

      Get the Runner's Web button for the Google Toolbar 4 for Internet
      Explorer from the link on our FrontPage at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com .

      TWITTER
      Follow us on Twitter at:
      http://twitter.com/runnersweb

      FACEBOOK
      We have reached the limit of 5000 friends on our Facebook page so we have added a Fans page at:
      http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/RunnersWebcom-Inc/189255654487874?sk=wall
      To join the Runner's Web Facebook group, if you are not a member of Facebook, you
      must first create a free Facebook account at www.facebook.com. Once you have your own space, search "Runner's Web" under "Groups".
      At the Runner's Web site, click "Join this group". Once I have approved your request to join, you'll be able to visit the site, post
      race photos, discuss training tips, and share information about running, racing and training.
      Join the almost 1,000 subscribers to the Runner's Web Facebook feeds.

      Race Directors: Advertise your event on the Runner's Web.
      For more information:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_advertising.html
      You can also list your events for free in our Interactive Calendars and on our Marathons, Races and Triathlons pages.

      NEW THIS WEEK:
      Event directors, add your event to our Event Calendar at:
      http://runnersweb.mhsoftware.com/
      Events must be approved before going live.

      If you feel you have something to say (related to triathlon or running) that is worthy of a Guest Column on the Runner's Web, email
      us at:
      mailto:webmaster@...

      We have 2742 subscribers as of publication time. Forward the Runner's Web Digest to a friend and suggest that they subscribe at:
      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/RunnersWeb/join .

      RUNNER'S AND TRIATHLETE'S WEB CONTENT PARTNERS

      THE STRETCHING HANDBOOK
      The Stretching Handbook has gained a reputation as one of the most user friendly publications on stretching, flexibility and sports
      injury prevention. It's been endorsed by some of the biggest names in the health and fitness industry, and received rave reviews and
      testimonials from hundreds of satisfied customers worldwide.
      And now there's the perfect companion to The Stretching Handbook: The Stretching DVD! There's over 100 minutes of individual
      stretching exercises for every major muscle group in your body, and customized routines for the Upper Body, the Lower Body and the
      Neck, Back & Core.
      Visit the site at: http://www.thestretchinghandbook.com/cmd.php?af=245575

      ROAD RUNNER SPORTS
      We have partnered with Road Runner Sports, the world's largest online running store, to provide a shopping portal. Check it out at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/Mobile_RRS.html

      * Sports Nutrition by Sheila Kealey. Sheila is one of Ottawa's top
      multisport athletes and a member of the OAC Racing Team and X-C Ottawa. She has a Masters in Public Health and works in the field of
      nutritional epidemiology as a Research Associate with the University of California, San Diego. Her column index is available at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/SK_index.html

      * Peak Performance Online Peak Performance is a subscription-only newsletter for athletes, featuring the latest research from the
      sports science world. We cover the whole range of sports, from running and rowing to cycling and swimming, and each issue is packed
      full of exclusive information for anyone who's serious about sport. It's published 16 times a year, including four special reports,
      by Electric Word plc. Peak Performance is not available in the shops - only our subscribers are able to access the valuable
      information we publish.
      Check out our article archive from Peak Performance Online at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/PPO_index.html
      Visit the PPO site at: Peak Performance Online:
      http://www.pponline.co.uk

      THIS WEEK'S PERSONAL POSTINGS/RELEASES: We will only post notes here regarding running and triathlon topics of interest to the
      community. We have TWO personal postings this week.
      ONE:
      Seasons Greeting from HK - Save 10% & up to 35% with HK Rewards!
      Human Kinetics is pleased to offer a 10% holiday discount and when combined with HK Rewards up to a 35% discount. Take advantage of
      this limited-time offer to add books to your library, give gifts to friends and colleagues, or get a head start on next year's
      needs. Enter code W458 in promo code box when your place your order at www.HumanKinetics.com Offer exp 12/31/12
      To save up to 35%, first sign up for HK Rewards at www.HumanKinetics.com/Rewards
      (This offer is valid only for products featured on the HumanKinetics.com site; it cannot be combined with other offers and is not
      valid for institutions; it excludes ASEP online courses and some distributed products; it is valid for Cdn customers only; and it is
      only valid for items purchased online)
      TWO:
      Calling all RUNNERS! What motivates you to run? What is your favorite race distance? How often do you run? You are being invited to
      participate in Running USA's National Runner Survey, a comprehensive survey to assess the demographics, lifestyle, attitudes,
      habits, and product preferences of the running population nationwide. The National Runner Survey is easy to access and available
      online. All responses are completely anonymous and confidential. Don't miss this opportunity to join other runners nationwide! To
      access the survey, click here: National Runner Survey: http://www.surveymk.com/s/NRS13RunnersWeb
      Select Runners Web as the organization that invited you to participate

      THIS WEEK'S DIGEST ARTICLE INDEX:

      1. The Too-Much-Running Myth Rises Again
      2. VO2max - The monthly newsletter of RunCoachJason.com
      3. Burning More Calories Is Easier When Working out With Someone You Perceive as Better
      4. Taking a Stand for Office Ergonomics
      5. How To Plan A Breakthrough Season of Running
      6. For Athletes, Risks From Ibuprofen Use
      7. Mental Training To Run and Race Your Best
      8. Tips for Running Outside During Winter
      9. Running in Reverse
      10. Dr. Gabe Mirkin's Fitness and Health e-Zine
      11. The Benefits of a Killer Training Week
      12. Protein Linking Exercise to Bigger, Stronger Muscles Discovered
      13. Improve your VO2 Max
      14. Running Too Far, Too Fast, and Too Long Speeds Progress 'to Finish Line of Life'
      15. Weird Stuff That Works


      THIS WEEK'S POLL:
      What events will you do next year?
      5,000m
      10,000m
      20k or Half-marathon
      Marathon
      Ultra
      Sprint triathlon
      Olympic distance triathlon
      Half-ironman triathlon
      Ironman triathlon
      None of the above

      Vote at: http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_vote.html

      PREVIOUS POLL RESULTS:
      Which of the following events have you done this year?

      Answers Percent Votes
      1 Cycling race 16% 58
      2 Duathlon 15% 56
      3 Marathon 17% 64
      4 Road race 20% 73
      5 Swimming race 15% 56
      6 Triathlon 17% 64
      Total Votes: 371

      You can access the poll from our FrontPage (http://www.runnersweb.com) as well as checking the results of previous polls.

      PHOTO SLIDESHOW:
      Our Photo Slideshow is updated on a random basis. Check it out from our FrontPage.

      FIVE STAR SITE OF THE MONTH: The New runningtimes.com
      By Jonathan Beverly.
      Published November 13, 2012..Welcome to the new Running Times website. You will quickly notice a new look — cleaner, brighter and
      easier to navigate and interact with. Explore a bit and you’ll notice larger changes. The biggest of these is that, for the first
      time, Running Times and Runner’s World are cooperating to bring you the best, most comprehensive running site ever assembled.
      Since 2007, Running Times and Runners World have been sister titles under the same owner, Rodale. Running Times provides content by
      and for the dedicated, experienced, serious runner. We assume you already understand workout shorthand (e.g., 6 x 800m at 5K pace)
      know who Steve Prefontaine is, know what type of shoe you like, and need to be told the “why” (what top runner does it, what coaches
      recommend it and what science backs it) when we suggest you change how you train and race. Runner’s World, as its title suggests,
      covers all things running, from beginners to elites, Kara Goucher to Kate Gosselin. While this includes material of interest to the
      long-term, serious runner, limited space in print keeps this to a small portion of the copy and aimed at a mainstream audience.
      On the web, however, you, the Running Times reader, can and should have access to the quality material that interests and educates
      you, regardless of the brand. The new site provides that. You’ll still enter and can stay within the Running Times site, where
      you’ll find trusted authors and see content selected by the Running Times editors (nothing on Sarah Palin, how to lose 5 lbs. or
      finish your first 5K). Now, however, on every article page you’ll be able to navigate to similar topics and pages on either site,
      and searches will turn up all relevant articles, regardless of the brand.
      In addition, you’ll find jointly branded sections where appropriate, most prominently the Newswire, where former RT editor Scott
      Douglas is now focusing his attention as news editor, bringing you “a steady stream of news and information about the world of
      races, runners and running.”
      Note that the site is a work in progress (isn’t everything?). Now that the initial migration is complete, we’ll be busy enhancing
      and expanding each topic and, particularly, each channel (High School, College, Masters, Trails). Keep a lookout for mobile versions
      to be rolled out as well.
      Visit the site at:
      http://www.runningtimes.com


      BOOK/VIDEO/MOVIE OF THE MONTH: “Injury-Free Running For Women Over 40” .
      Our “Injury-Free Running For Women Over 40” ebook launched in November/
      You’ll discover how to:
      * Keep free of injury in just 40 minutes per week
      * Stop injury from ruining your plans for running and racing
      * Prevent injury from robbing you of the joy and exhilaration you feel when you’re running
      * Enjoy all running’s benefits for many years to come
      And much more!
      Injured now or suffer from a chronic injury? You’ll learn how to quickly recover form 6 common running injuries and get back on the
      roads ASAP.
      To celebrate, “Injury-Free Running For Women Over 40” is on sale at a one-time low introductory price of $19.97 …………… and we’re
      including three free bonus reports too!
      Buy the book from the International Association of Women Runners at:
      http://bit.ly/KrtTDS

      For more publications on running and triathlon visit:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/human_kinetics.html and
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/amazon.html
      http://www.runnersweb.com/running/velopress.html

      THIS WEEK'S FEATURES:


      1. The Too-Much-Running Myth Rises Again:
      Risks of an overdose are greatly exaggerated.
      By Alex Hutchinson.
      Stop me if you've heard this one before, but... RUNNING TOO MUCH COULD KILL YOU!!! That's the message of a Wall Street Journal
      article that's making the rounds this week, based on a forthcoming editorial in the journal Heart. Sound familiar? It should,
      because someone writes an article with this message every few months, and it invariably rockets around the cybersphere powered by
      schadenfreude.
      In this case, it should sound extra-familiar, because the Heart editorial is co-written by some of the same team that wrote
      "Cardiovascular damage resulting from chronic excessive endurance exercise" in July, and "Potential adverse cardiovascular effects
      from excessive endurance exercise" in June, not to mention last year's "Exercise like a hunter-gatherer: a prescription for organic
      physical fitness." As cardiologist Paul Thompson says in the WSJ piece, "The guys advancing the hypothesis that you can get too much
      exercise are manipulating the data... They have an agenda."
      Of course, I have an agenda too. I like running, and that inevitably colors my perspective. I posted my thoughts on this topic in
      detail earlier this year, during one of the earlier iterations of this same debate (sparked by essentially the same article by James
      O'Keefe et al. in a different journal). As I said then, there's no doubt whatsoever that the health benefits of aerobic exercise
      eventually reach a point of diminishing returns. Where is that point? No one really knows, but my personal feeling is that if you're
      running more than an hour a day, you're doing it for reasons other than optimizing health. Which is fine. But crucially, that
      doesn't mean you're hurting your health by running an hour a day, and when people start making suggestions like that, I agree with
      Thompson that they're twisting the data.
      More...from Sweat Science at:
      http://www.runnersworld.com/health/too-much-running-myth-rises-again


      2. VO2max - The monthly newsletter of RunCoachJason.com:
      ** Running Form
      I see a lot of runners. And I see a lot of runners running badly. Many of these runners run races. Many of these runners get
      injured training for races. One of the reasons they get injured is because they haven't learned how to run before attempting to
      train for a race. It's like playing in a tennis tournament before learning how to hit a backhand. Learning how to run correctly
      will help prevent injuries and enable you to tolerate greater training loads since you will be undertaking the training with the
      proper skill to do so. If you want to be a better runner, start by running better. To learn proper form, check out this video I
      made with Active.com:
      http://www.active.com/running/articles/5-steps-to-proper-running-form.htm
      ** The power to succeed
      It’s Not What Your Muscles Look Like, It’s What They Do That Matters, Writes Dr Jason Karp.
      Back in the States I often observe playgrounds when I run by, and I’ve heard more than once the familiar boast of youth, “I bet my
      muscles are bigger than your muscles!” These are the words of boys comparing the size of their biceps, showing them off to the
      girls. It’s not uncommon for school cafeterias to turn into venues for arm wrestling, where boys
      challenge one another at the lunch table, the winner getting his opponent’s sandwich. Even as children, we have always been
      fascinated by our muscles.
      At first glance, endurance sports don’t seem to have much to do with big, strong muscles. After all, when was the last time you saw
      a big, muscular distance runner?
      Indeed, the best distance runners in the world are quite small with slim legs and arms. As an endurance athlete, you can still
      benefi t from speed, strength, and power training, as long as you don’t start looking like your sprint counterpart. It’s not what
      your muscles look like – it’s what they do that matters
      More... http://www.runcoachjason.com/PowerTrainingforEndurance.pdf
      To view past newsletters go to: http://www.runcoachjason.com/newsletter
      Copyright 2012 Jason Karp All Rights Reserved - http://www.runcoachjason.com


      3. Burning More Calories Is Easier When Working out With Someone You Perceive as Better:
      The key to motivation in physical activity may be feeling inadequate. One Kansas State University researcher found that those who
      exercised with a teammate whom they perceived to be better increased their workout time and intensity by as much as 200 percent.
      Brandon Irwin, assistant professor of kinesiology, was the principle investigator in a study that tested whether individuals engage
      in more intense physical activity when alone, with a virtual partner or competing against a teammate.
      "People like to exercise with others and make it a social activity," Irwin said. "We found that when you're performing with someone
      who you perceive as a little better than you, you tend to give more effort than you normally would alone."
      More...from Science Daily at:
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121126130938.htm


      4. Taking a Stand for Office Ergonomics:
      THE health studies that conclude that people should sit less, and get up and move around more, have always struck me as fitting into
      the “well, duh” category.
      But a closer look at the accumulating research on sitting reveals something more intriguing, and disturbing: the health hazards of
      sitting for long stretches are significant even for people who are quite active when they’re not sitting down. That point was
      reiterated recently in two studies, published in The British Journal of Sports Medicine and in Diabetologia, a journal of the
      European Association for the Study of Diabetes.
      Suppose you stick to a five-times-a-week gym regimen, as I do, and have put in a lifetime of hard cardio exercise, and have a
      resting heart rate that’s a significant fraction below the norm. That doesn’t inoculate you, apparently, from the perils of sitting.

      More...from the NY Times at:
      http://tinyurl.com/c9jee8h


      5. How To Plan A Breakthrough Season of Running:
      With the New Year approaching the season of giddy goal setting is almost upon us. You know, that short window at the end of the year
      when everyone makes snap resolutions about health, fitness, work, family, diet. Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of these promises
      fail long before we remember to cancel that gym membership…but it doesn’t have to be this way. You can still set lofty goals for
      your season and achieve them, but it takes more than a deadline and peer pressure. It takes some quality planning.
      Five Simple Planning Mistakes that Everyday Runners Make
      If you stop to observe your own running history, or that of your friends, you’ll probably be able to pick up a few quick points on
      thing “not to do” in advance of a big year. Here are a few that come to mind; your own list might be longer!
      * Too Little Too Late — Choosing a late-season race that allows you to procrastinate like a professional for so long that by the
      time the race arrives you have a bigger hill to climb than when you started.
      * Too Much Too Soon — Picking a lofty goal and putting it so close there’s not enough time to train.
      * Last-Minute Mixing — Adding spontaneous events to your schedule in such a way as to undermine your overall training progression.
      * Goal Grabbing — Jumping on the bandwagon of a friend, simply adopting their goal and running out of motivation or desire before
      race day.
      * Chasing Distance Not Fitness — Setting arbitrary targets for long run or training weeks irrespective of your fitness, leading to
      great training benchmarks but sub-optimal racing.
      More...from Marathon Nation at:
      http://www.marathonnation.us/planning-2/how-to-plan-a-breakthrough-season-of-running/


      6. For Athletes, Risks From Ibuprofen Use:
      Many active people use the painkiller ibuprofen on an almost daily basis. In surveys, up to 70 percent of distance runners and other
      endurance athletes report that they down the pills before every workout or competition, viewing the drug as a preemptive strike
      against muscle soreness.
      But a valuable new study joins growing evidence that ibuprofen and similar anti-inflammatory painkillers taken before a workout
      don’t offer any benefit and may be causing disagreeable physical damage instead, particularly to the intestines.
      Studies have already shown that strenuous exercise alone commonly results in a small amount of intestinal trauma. A representative
      experiment published last year found that cyclists who rode hard for an hour immediately developed elevated blood levels of a marker
      that indicates slight gastrointestinal leakage.
      Physiologically, it makes sense that exercise would affect the intestines as it does, since, during prolonged exertion, digestion
      becomes a luxury, said Dr. Kim van Wijck, currently a surgical resident at Orbis Medical Center in the Netherlands, who led the
      small study. So the blood that normally would flow to the small intestine is instead diverted to laboring muscles. Starved of blood,
      some of the cells lining the intestines are traumatized and start to leak.
      More...from the NY Times at:
      http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/05/for-athletes-risks-from-ibuprofen-use/?ref=nutrition


      7. Mental Training To Run and Race Your Best:
      Many runners underestimate the importance of mental training. They experience negative self-talk when faced with a demanding
      workout. When feeling fatigue, they tell themselves that it’s too difficult. They compare themselves to other runners who look
      fitter or faster. They doubt their own ability to complete the training.
      Prior to becoming our coaching client, Kim McClure (Toronto) had done neither speed work nor had run workouts with goal paces.
      During some workouts, she doubted her own ability to maintain her goal pace for the duration of the run. She questioned if she could
      carry out her training.
      Kim stuck with it. She soon realized that the workouts were designed to pinpoint her current thresholds and help her break through
      her self-imposed limits. She correctly concluded that she was not being asked to complete anything she was not capable of.
      Challenging, yet achievable.
      Her tenacity paid off. As a result of overcoming her doubts and completing her challenging program, she approached the start line
      full of confidence. After just three months of training, Kim reduced her half-marathon time by over 10 minutes (from 1:59:45 to
      1:49:18 in the 2011 Hamilton Half-Marathon).
      More...from the IAWR at:
      http://www.iawr-connect.com/training/mental-training-to-run-and-race-your-best/


      8. Tips for Running Outside During Winter:
      Everyone loves a run on a crisp fall morning. The brightly colored leaves provide the backdrop for your run, while the clean, dry
      air fuels a great workout. The temperature is perfect for maximizing your performance.
      But what happens when, inevitably, fall turns to winter? Let's break winter running down to help you deal with the major setbacks
      runners experience during the colder months. Navigating sub-freezing temperatures, snow and ice is difficult for even the most
      winter-ready runner.
      http://tinyurl.com/asxlrdq


      9. Running in Reverse:
      This column appears in the Dec. 9 issue of The New York Times Magazine.
      Backward running, also known as reverse or retro running, is not as celebrated as barefoot running and will never be mistaken for
      the natural way to run. But a small body of science suggests that backward running enables people to avoid or recover from common
      injuries, burn extra calories, sharpen balance and, not least, mix up their daily routine.
      The technique is simple enough. Most of us have done it, at least in a modified, abbreviated form, and probably recently, perhaps
      hopping back from a curb as a bus went by or pushing away from the oven with a roasting pan in both hands. But training with
      backward running is different. Biomechanically, it is forward motion’s doppelgänger. In a study published last year, biomechanics
      researchers at the University of Milan in Italy had a group of runners stride forward and backward at a steady pace along a track
      equipped with force sensors and cameras.
      They found that, as expected, the runners struck the ground near the back of their feet when going forward and rolled onto the front
      of their feet for takeoff. When they went backward though, they landed near the front of their feet and took off from the heels.
      They tended to lean slightly forward even when running backward. As a result, their muscles fired differently. In forward running,
      the muscles and tendons were pulled taut during landing and responded by coiling, a process that creates elastic energy (think
      rubber bands) that is then released during toe-off. When running backward, muscles and tendons were coiled during landing and
      stretched at takeoff. The backward runners’ legs didn’t benefit from stored elastic energy. In fact, the researchers found, running
      backward required nearly 30 percent more energy than running forward at the same speed. But backward running also produced far less
      hard pounding.
      More...from the NY Times at:
      http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/running-in-reverse/


      10. Dr. Gabe Mirkin's Fitness and Health e-Zine:
      * Healthy Older People Can and Should Compete in Endurance Events
      An editorial in the January 2013 British medical journal, Heart, states that "Running too fast, too far, and for too many
      years may speed one's progress toward the finish line of life." The author bases his opinion on two recent reports presented at
      medical meetings:
      * DISTANCE: One study of 52,600 people followed for 30 years showed that runners had a 19 percent lower death rate than non runners,
      but those who ran more than 25 miles a week did not live longer than non-runners.
      * SPEED: Another study showed that runners who ran slower than eight miles per hour lived longer than non-runners, but those who ran
      faster than 8 MPH did not live longer.
      These two studies are far too limited to make you think that older people should limit how much and how intensely they
      exercise. THEY APPEAR TO SHOW THAT INTENSE OLDER RUNNERS DO NOT GAIN AN ADVANTAGE OVER NON-RUNNERS. THEY DO NOT SHOW THAT RUNNING IS
      HARMING THEM. No reasonable physician should use just this data to recommend limiting exercise in older people. Overwhelming
      evidence shows that exercise helps prevent and treat obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attacks, strokes, and certain
      cancers, and helps to prolong life.
      I am 77 years old and ride a bicycle more than 200 miles per week, race three times a week at 20 MPH, do interval training
      once a week, and lift weights seven days a week. I have no plans to change my training.
      James H. O'Keefe, a cardiologist in Kansas City who was an elite triathlon athlete, summarizes his concerns about older
      people exercising far and fast (Mayo Clinic Proceedings (June 2012;87(6):587-595). He believes that too much exercise damages the
      heart and arteries by:
      1) causing heart muscle to release enzymes (troponin and B-type
      natriuretic peptide) into the bloodstream, a sign of heart damage.
      2) scarring the heart muscle
      3) increasing calcium plaques in the large arteries
      4) causing irregular heartbeats, in particular atrial fibrillation.
      He is concerned about these findings in spite of the fact that he has no data to show that older exercisers are harmed by
      these changes. Overwhelming data show that exercisers have lower rates of disability and death (Arch Intern Med,
      2008;168(15):1638-1646), and are healthier and live more than seven years longer than non-exercisers (Med Sci Sports Exerc.,
      1993;25(2):237-244).
      REFUTING HIS ARGUMENTS COLLECTIVELY: The apparent heart damage is the same type of muscle damage that is seen in the
      skeletal muscles of trained athletes. Here is why these changes are as beneficial to the heart muscle as they are to the skeletal
      muscles.
      Every serious athlete learns that all training is done by "stressing and recovering". IF YOU WANT TO MAKE A MUSCLE STRONGER,
      YOU HAVE TO EXERCISE SO INTENSELY THAT YOU DAMAGE THAT MUSCLE. Then when the muscle heals, it is stronger than before it was
      damaged. So, knowledgeable athletes:
      * Take a hard workout that damages their skeletal muscles. They know this because they feel burning during exercise, and soreness in
      their muscles eight to 24 hours after this intense workout.
      * Then they take less intense workouts for as many days as it takes for the muscles to heal and the soreness to go away. If they do
      not take easier workouts on the days when their muscles are sore, they often injure themselves.
      So workouts for knowledgeable athletes in all sports typically alternate one or more days of intense workouts with as many
      easy workouts as needed to allow recovery.
      REFUTING EACH POINT INDIVIDUALLY:
      1) HEART MUSCLE RELEASES ENZYMES (TROPONIN AND B-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE) INTO THE BLOODSTREAM, A SIGN OF HEART DAMAGE:
      This is the training effect that you expect from proper exercise training. If you don't "damage" a skeletal muscle, it will not
      become stronger. If you don't "damage" the heart muscle, it will not become stronger. These enzymes that leak from the heart muscle
      into the bloodstream return to normal in less than a week, in the same manner that enzymes from damaged skeletal muscles return to
      normal in the same amount of time.
      2) SCARRING OF THE HEART MUSCLE: The "scarring" of heart muscle is the same as the scarring in skeletal muscles. It
      disappears after the muscle heals and is necessary for muscles to become stronger. (Refer to the parts of muscles in the picture at
      http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~sjjgsca/MuscleSarcomere.gif ). Skeletal muscles are composed of thousands of muscle fibers. Each fiber is
      a long rope made up of a series of thousands of similar blocks called sarcomeres, lined end to end to form a long chain. Each block
      attaches to the next sarcomere at the "Z line". Muscles function by shortening a little bit at each of the thousands of "Z lines".
      The "Z lines" all shorten simultaneously and the entire
      muscle then can contract. The "Z lines" are where muscles are damaged. It is damage to these "Z lines that causes muscle growth
      after healing, which makes muscles stronger.
      3) INCREASED CALCIUM PLAQUES IN THE LARGE ARTERIES: Plaques in arteries may have more to do with the diet of endurance
      athletes than their exercise programs. High mileage athletes burn far more calories each day than do casual exercisers.
      Therefore, they have to eat far more food in order to have the energy to power their muscles during training. The extra food that
      athletes eat is likely to contain far more saturated fat, sugar, high glycemic-load foods, red meat, sugared drinks, and calories.
      All of these food components can increase the formation of plaques in arteries. Therefore, it is probably the increased intake of
      plaque- forming foods, and not the extra mileage, that may negate
      some of the benefits of long and hard exercise. Athletes who eat huge amounts of food and restrict these unhealthful components
      should have almost no plaques at all. I think that future studies will demonstrate that the increased deposition of plaques has
      nothing to do with running more miles or faster miles.
      4) IRREGULAR HEART BEATS, IN PARTICULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION:
      At this time, we do not know if there really is an increased risk for irregular heartbeats in endurance athletes. All we know is
      that older competitive athletes suffer from irregular heartbeats just as younger athletes and non-athletes do. Furthermore, we have
      no evidence that older athletes are at increased risk for the harmful side effects of irregular heartbeats: fainting, accidents or
      sudden death.
      The main concern about atrial fibrillation is that the patients are at increased risk for clotting in general and strokes in
      particular. However, nobody has shown that older endurance athletes with atrial fibrillation are at increased risk for clotting or
      strokes.
      Dr. O'Keefe himself writes: "Sudden cardiac death among marathoners is very rare, with one event per 100,000 participants."
      Here are two of his references: Med Sci Sports
      Exerc. 2012;44(6):990-994; N Engl J Med . 2012;366(2):130-140.
      BENEFITS OF ENDURANCE EXERCISE IN ALL AGE GROUPS: Dr O'Keefe is completely honest and reasonable in listing the following
      ways exercise helps to prevent and treat heart attacks:
      * Increases the good HDL cholesterol
      * lowers triglycerides
      * treats obesity
      * lowers high blood pressure
      * Improves insulin sensitivity
      * lowers blood sugar
      * strengthens arteries
      * helps with smoking cessation
      * reduces psychological stress
      * lowers hematocrit and blood viscosity
      * expands blood volume
      * prevents clotting
      * increases blood flow to the heart
      * increases collateral circulation to the heart
      * increases tolerance of decreased blood flow to the heart
      * reduces atherosclerosis
      * enlarges arteries leading to the heart
      * reduces major sickness and death
      MY LAST WORD ON THE SUBJECT: I am 77 years old and plan to continue riding my bicycle 200 miles a week.
      Note: I have sent this to the Wall Street Journal in response to their article, "One Running Shoe in the Grave",November 27,
      2012.
      From Dr Gabe Mirkin at:
      http://www.drmirkin.com


      11. The Benefits of a Killer Training Week:
      Super-loading your training once a month can pay off, a new study finds.
      By Alex Hutchinson.
      Published December 04, 2012. Many cross-country teams have annual training camps where they gather in some remote location for a few
      days to do crazy amounts of running at crazy intensities. This has always seemed to me to be sort of, well, crazy. But a recent
      study that Amby Burfoot mentioned on Twitter got me thinking.
      The study is by researchers in Norway, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, and it deals with what
      they call "block periodization." The basic gist of their theory seems to be that if you're trying to do everything at once in any
      given training week (i.e. easy miles, speed work, threshold work, etc.), you can't put enough emphasis on any one of the elements to
      really push to a new level. This is a particular problem for already-well-trained endurance athletes, who have already taken all the
      "easy" adaptations that occur when you first start training.
      More...from Sweat Science at:
      http://www.runnersworld.com/workouts/benefits-killer-training-week


      12. Protein Linking Exercise to Bigger, Stronger Muscles Discovered:
      Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have isolated a previously unknown protein in muscles that spurs their growth and
      increased power following resistance exercise. They suggest that artificially raising the protein's levels might someday help
      prevent muscle loss caused by cancer, prolonged inactivity in hospital patients, and aging.
      Mice given extra doses of the protein gained muscle mass and strength, and rodents with cancer were much less affected by cachexia,
      the loss of muscle that often occurs in cancer patients, according to the report in the Dec. 7 issue of the journal Cell.
      "This is basic science at present," commented Jorge Ruas, PhD, first author of the report. "But if you could find a way to elevate
      levels of this protein, that would be very exciting. For example, you might be able to reduce muscle wasting in patients in
      intensive care units whose muscles atrophy because of prolonged bed rest." Other applications, he said, might be in disorders such
      as muscular dystrophy and the gradual loss of muscle mass from aging.
      More...from Science Daily at:
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121206121728.htm


      13. Improve your VO2 Max:
      All aerobic endurance activities, like running, bicycling, swimming, and cross-country skiing, are essentially contests to see how
      much oxygen your body can deliver to your exercising muscles. Increase the amount of oxygen, and you can run, bike, swim, or ski
      faster.
      In running, of course, those muscles are in your legs. As you train, two things happen to improve your muscles' ability to use
      oxygen. First, your heart gets stronger and delivers more oxygen; and second, your leg muscles get better at using the oxygen.
      In their laboratory research, scientists frequently measure this delivery and use of oxygen, calling it maximum oxygen uptake or VO2
      max. They consider maximum oxygen uptake to be the most basic measure of aerobic fitness, and they've shown that it increases as you
      train more and harder. I generally reverse the letter order, since max VO2 has a friendlier sound than VO2 max.
      More...from the Sport Factory at:
      http://thesportfactory.com/site/trainingnews/improvevo2max.shtml


      14. Running Too Far, Too Fast, and Too Long Speeds Progress 'to Finish Line of Life':
      Vigorous exercise is good for health, but only if it's limited to a maximum daily dose of between 30 and 50 minutes, say
      researchers in an editorial published online in Heart.
      The idea that more and more high intensity exercise, such as marathons, can only do you good, is a myth say the US cardiologists,
      and the evidence shows that it's likely to more harm than good to your heart.
      "If you really want to do a marathon or full distance triathlon, etc, it may be best to do just one or a few and then proceed to
      safer and healthier exercise patterns," they warn.
      "A routine of moderate physical activity will add life to your years as well as years to your life. In contrast, running too far,
      too fast, and for too many years may speed one's progress to towards the finishing line of life."
      More...from Science Daily at:
      http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129143456.htm


      15. Weird Stuff That Works:
      A look at some of the innovative products in this wonderful, weird new world. Running used to be easy. Left, right, repeat. It still
      is.
      What Will They Think of Next?
      You can head out the door anytime, outfitted with nothing but shorts and shoes.
      The shoes alone, however, seem to be returning to simpler profiles of years gone by. Everything else has gotten more complicated.
      The latest tinkering, applied to our training, recovery, the air that we breathe and the blood that circulates inside our veins, can
      make the sport resemble something out of an MIT lab.
      Not surprisingly, it's the elite athletes, from Galen Rupp to Lauren Fleshman, who've been the earliest adopters of the newest
      running technology. Lucky for us, their fun--and sometimes wacky--new toys are quickly becoming accessible to all.
      More...from Runner's World at:
      http://www.runnersworld.com/photos/weird-stuff-works


      THIS WEEK'S FEATURED EVENTS:
      *Please verify event dates with the event websites available from our FrontPage
      (www.runnersweb.com)

      December 8, 2012:
      Tucson Marathon, Tucson, AZ

      December 9, 2012:
      Holiday Half-Marathon, 5K, Kids Fun Run - Pomona, CA

      Honolulu Marathon - Hawaii

      MetroPCS Dallas Marathon - Dallas, TX
      Formerly the Dallas White Rock Marathon

      Santa to the Sea Half-Marathon, Relay, 5K - Oxnard, CA

      Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ

      (Inaugural) Woman's Half Marathon & 10K - Baton Rouge, LA

      June 22, 2013
      Emilie's Run - The Emilie Mondor Memorial 5K Race for Women
      http://www.emiliesrun.com

      For more complete race listings check out our Upcoming Races, and Calendars.
      Check the Runner's Web on Sunday and Monday for race reports on these events at:
      http://www.runnersweb.com/

      Send this to a Friend:
      Forward the Runner's Web Digest to a friend and suggest that they subscribe at:
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      YOUR FEEDBACK AND COMMENTS:
      Comments, contributions and feedback are always welcome via this list at:
      mailto:runnersweb@yahoogroups.com and in our Runner's Web Forum,
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      Forward the Runner's Web Digest to a friend and suggest that they subscribe at:
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      Have a good week of training and/or racing.

      Ken

      Ken Parker
      www.RunnersWeb.com
      The Running and Triathlon Resource Portal
      mailto:kparker@...
      613-746-4053
      http://www.OACRacingTeam.com
      http://www.EmiliesRun.com

      *** END OF RUNNER'S AND TRIATHLETE'S WEB DIGEST...***
    • Ken Parker
      We had a problem with Yahoo not delivering the Digest yesterday. If you are receiving a second copy we apologize. Ken A FREE WEEKLY E-ZINE OF MULTISPORT
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 8, 2012
      • 0 Attachment
        We had a problem with Yahoo not delivering the Digest yesterday. If you are receiving a second copy we apologize.

        Ken


        A FREE WEEKLY E-ZINE OF MULTISPORT RELATED ARTICLES.
        The Runner's and Triathlete's Web Digest is a weekly e-zine dealing with the sports of running and triathlon and general fitness and
        health issues. The opinions expressed in the articles referenced by the Digest are the opinions of the writers and not necessarily
        those of the Runner's Web. Visit the Runner's Web at http://www.runnersweb.com The site is updated multiple times daily. Check out
        our daily news, features, polls, trivia, bulletin boards and more.

        SUPPORT OUR ADVERTISERS: All of the revenue from our advertisers and affiliates goes to support clubs, athletes and clinics related
        to multisport and Canadian Olympians.

        1. Emilie's Run - The Emilie Mondor Memorial 5K Race for Women - Canada's Fastest Women's 5K.
        The 2013 race will be run on June 22nd.
        Sports 4 is providing cash prizing as follows:
        First Overall $1000, Second Overall $750, Third Overall $550, Fourth Overall $400, Fifth Overall $300
        First Masters (40 & over*) $500
        There are cash prizes for the following:
        New Race Record: $1000, New Masters (40 & over*) Record: $500, New 5 Year Age Category Age : $100
        *age as of Dec 31, 2013
        For more on the race visit the website
        at: http://www.emiliesrun.com.

        2. Road Runner Sports, the world's largest running store at:
        http://clickserve.cc-dt.com/link/click?lid=41000000010069822.

        3. Toronto Waterfront Marathon, date October 14, 2012
        The fastest men's and women's marathon on Canadian soil!
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/STWM_Transporter.html

        4. Goodlife Fitness Toronto Marathon - ~Online Registration is Now Open~
        Next year's race will be run on Sunday May 5, 2013
        http://www.torontomarathon.com/registration/online-registration.html

        5. Training Peaks
        The Runner's Web has partnered with Training Peaks to provide online
        coaching from experts such as Hal Higdon, Joel Friel and Matt
        Fitzgerald. Sign up at:
        https://home.trainingpeaks.com/create-account-personal-edition.aspx?af=RunnersWeb

        6. iRun Magazine
        iRun is Canada's highest-circulation and most popular running magazine. With a total distribution of 50,000 and more than 9,000
        subscribers, iRun is leading the market in the rapidly growing and highly desirable demographic of Canadian runners.
        iRun Magazine is a sponsor of Emilie's Run
        http://www.irun.ca/

        8. Canadian Running Magazine: Subscribe at:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/CanadianRunner.html

        7. Olympic Physical Therapy and Foot Orthotics:
        Olympic Physical Therapy and Foot Orthotics was founded in May of 2000 by Don Levine, MSPT and Bert Reid, DPT, to provide outpatient
        physical therapy and sports medicine rehabilitation to the residents of Rhode Island and South Eastern Massachusetts. Consistently
        assessing the needs of our communities while striving to provide the highest level of care and customer service. This has allowed
        Olympic and its staff to thrive and earn accolades such as, in 2007, becoming the first recipient of the Small Business of the Year
        award from The Newport Chamber of Commerce
        http://olympicpt-ri.com

        8. Penticton Challenge Triathlon:
        Welcome to Challenge Penticton, the first time a Challenge event will be held in North America and the exclusive Challenge Family
        race in Canada.
        Challenge Penticton is the race of a lifetime and the perfect way to train, compete and vacation in paradise. Join athletes from all
        over the world for the 3.8 km swim, the 180 km cycle and the 42.2 km run. Wave starts allow for relay team entries, opening the
        long-distance triathlon experience to more athletes.
        We pay the tax! Challenge Penticton will offer more value to athletes for less: Individual registration fees have been set at $675
        CDN, including all taxes, while teams will pay $800. Professional triathletes will benefit from a prize purse of more than $60,000
        CDN that pays down to 10th place.
        Register now to join Penticton on Aug. 2013 as the B.C. city is welcomed into the Challenge Family fold.
        The race website is at:
        http://www.challenge-penticton.com

        9. Marathon Bahamas:
        Perfect ocean breezes, swaying palm trees, and miles of white, sandy beaches caressed by crystalline waters - could there be a
        better backdrop for a marathon? Held in historic Nassau, the Sunshine Insurance Race Weekend is the ideal international winter
        running event, and only a 30-minute flight from South Florida.
        Athletes from 25 countries and 37 states have flocked to the idyllic island capital for what has become the signature endurance
        event of the country. The flat, fast 26.2-mile course features the best focal points of the Bahamas with an oceanfront start and
        finish, stunning cityscapes, historic charm, and miles of unobstructed views of aquamarine water.
        Kicking off at Junkaboo Beach, marathoners will weave through quaint downtown Nassau, lined with historic buildings, the glitz and
        glam of Paradise Island, and then hug the northern Shores of Cable Beach before crossing the finish line at Arawak Cay.
        All participants receive a technical race shirt, runner swag bag, commemorative finisher medal, and access to an awesome post-race
        beach party where fatigued finishers can load up on great food, cold beer, and music.
        Website: http://marathonbahamas.com

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        At the Runner's Web site, click "Join this group". Once I have approved your request to join, you'll be able to visit the site, post
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        Race Directors: Advertise your event on the Runner's Web.
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        NEW THIS WEEK:
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        Events must be approved before going live.

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        RUNNER'S AND TRIATHLETE'S WEB CONTENT PARTNERS

        THE STRETCHING HANDBOOK
        The Stretching Handbook has gained a reputation as one of the most user friendly publications on stretching, flexibility and sports
        injury prevention. It's been endorsed by some of the biggest names in the health and fitness industry, and received rave reviews and
        testimonials from hundreds of satisfied customers worldwide.
        And now there's the perfect companion to The Stretching Handbook: The Stretching DVD! There's over 100 minutes of individual
        stretching exercises for every major muscle group in your body, and customized routines for the Upper Body, the Lower Body and the
        Neck, Back & Core.
        Visit the site at: http://www.thestretchinghandbook.com/cmd.php?af=245575

        ROAD RUNNER SPORTS
        We have partnered with Road Runner Sports, the world's largest online running store, to provide a shopping portal. Check it out at:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/Mobile_RRS.html

        * Sports Nutrition by Sheila Kealey. Sheila is one of Ottawa's top
        multisport athletes and a member of the OAC Racing Team and X-C Ottawa. She has a Masters in Public Health and works in the field of
        nutritional epidemiology as a Research Associate with the University of California, San Diego. Her column index is available at:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/SK_index.html

        * Peak Performance Online Peak Performance is a subscription-only newsletter for athletes, featuring the latest research from the
        sports science world. We cover the whole range of sports, from running and rowing to cycling and swimming, and each issue is packed
        full of exclusive information for anyone who's serious about sport. It's published 16 times a year, including four special reports,
        by Electric Word plc. Peak Performance is not available in the shops - only our subscribers are able to access the valuable
        information we publish.
        Check out our article archive from Peak Performance Online at:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/PPO_index.html
        Visit the PPO site at: Peak Performance Online:
        http://www.pponline.co.uk

        THIS WEEK'S PERSONAL POSTINGS/RELEASES: We will only post notes here regarding running and triathlon topics of interest to the
        community. We have TWO personal postings this week.
        ONE:
        Seasons Greeting from HK - Save 10% & up to 35% with HK Rewards!
        Human Kinetics is pleased to offer a 10% holiday discount and when combined with HK Rewards up to a 35% discount. Take advantage of
        this limited-time offer to add books to your library, give gifts to friends and colleagues, or get a head start on next year's
        needs. Enter code W458 in promo code box when your place your order at www.HumanKinetics.com Offer exp 12/31/12
        To save up to 35%, first sign up for HK Rewards at www.HumanKinetics.com/Rewards
        (This offer is valid only for products featured on the HumanKinetics.com site; it cannot be combined with other offers and is not
        valid for institutions; it excludes ASEP online courses and some distributed products; it is valid for Cdn customers only; and it is
        only valid for items purchased online)
        TWO:
        Calling all RUNNERS! What motivates you to run? What is your favorite race distance? How often do you run? You are being invited to
        participate in Running USA's National Runner Survey, a comprehensive survey to assess the demographics, lifestyle, attitudes,
        habits, and product preferences of the running population nationwide. The National Runner Survey is easy to access and available
        online. All responses are completely anonymous and confidential. Don't miss this opportunity to join other runners nationwide! To
        access the survey, click here: National Runner Survey: http://www.surveymk.com/s/NRS13RunnersWeb
        Select Runners Web as the organization that invited you to participate

        THIS WEEK'S DIGEST ARTICLE INDEX:

        1. The Too-Much-Running Myth Rises Again
        2. VO2max - The monthly newsletter of RunCoachJason.com
        3. Burning More Calories Is Easier When Working out With Someone You Perceive as Better
        4. Taking a Stand for Office Ergonomics
        5. How To Plan A Breakthrough Season of Running
        6. For Athletes, Risks From Ibuprofen Use
        7. Mental Training To Run and Race Your Best
        8. Tips for Running Outside During Winter
        9. Running in Reverse
        10. Dr. Gabe Mirkin's Fitness and Health e-Zine
        11. The Benefits of a Killer Training Week
        12. Protein Linking Exercise to Bigger, Stronger Muscles Discovered
        13. Improve your VO2 Max
        14. Running Too Far, Too Fast, and Too Long Speeds Progress 'to Finish Line of Life'
        15. Weird Stuff That Works


        THIS WEEK'S POLL:
        What events will you do next year?
        5,000m
        10,000m
        20k or Half-marathon
        Marathon
        Ultra
        Sprint triathlon
        Olympic distance triathlon
        Half-ironman triathlon
        Ironman triathlon
        None of the above

        Vote at: http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_vote.html

        PREVIOUS POLL RESULTS:
        Which of the following events have you done this year?

        Answers Percent Votes
        1 Cycling race 16% 58
        2 Duathlon 15% 56
        3 Marathon 17% 64
        4 Road race 20% 73
        5 Swimming race 15% 56
        6 Triathlon 17% 64
        Total Votes: 371

        You can access the poll from our FrontPage (http://www.runnersweb.com) as well as checking the results of previous polls.

        PHOTO SLIDESHOW:
        Our Photo Slideshow is updated on a random basis. Check it out from our FrontPage.

        FIVE STAR SITE OF THE MONTH: The New runningtimes.com
        By Jonathan Beverly.
        Published November 13, 2012..Welcome to the new Running Times website. You will quickly notice a new look — cleaner, brighter and
        easier to navigate and interact with. Explore a bit and you’ll notice larger changes. The biggest of these is that, for the first
        time, Running Times and Runner’s World are cooperating to bring you the best, most comprehensive running site ever assembled.
        Since 2007, Running Times and Runners World have been sister titles under the same owner, Rodale. Running Times provides content by
        and for the dedicated, experienced, serious runner. We assume you already understand workout shorthand (e.g., 6 x 800m at 5K pace)
        know who Steve Prefontaine is, know what type of shoe you like, and need to be told the “why” (what top runner does it, what coaches
        recommend it and what science backs it) when we suggest you change how you train and race. Runner’s World, as its title suggests,
        covers all things running, from beginners to elites, Kara Goucher to Kate Gosselin. While this includes material of interest to the
        long-term, serious runner, limited space in print keeps this to a small portion of the copy and aimed at a mainstream audience.
        On the web, however, you, the Running Times reader, can and should have access to the quality material that interests and educates
        you, regardless of the brand. The new site provides that. You’ll still enter and can stay within the Running Times site, where
        you’ll find trusted authors and see content selected by the Running Times editors (nothing on Sarah Palin, how to lose 5 lbs. or
        finish your first 5K). Now, however, on every article page you’ll be able to navigate to similar topics and pages on either site,
        and searches will turn up all relevant articles, regardless of the brand.
        In addition, you’ll find jointly branded sections where appropriate, most prominently the Newswire, where former RT editor Scott
        Douglas is now focusing his attention as news editor, bringing you “a steady stream of news and information about the world of
        races, runners and running.”
        Note that the site is a work in progress (isn’t everything?). Now that the initial migration is complete, we’ll be busy enhancing
        and expanding each topic and, particularly, each channel (High School, College, Masters, Trails). Keep a lookout for mobile versions
        to be rolled out as well.
        Visit the site at:
        http://www.runningtimes.com


        BOOK/VIDEO/MOVIE OF THE MONTH: “Injury-Free Running For Women Over 40” .
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        * Enjoy all running’s benefits for many years to come
        And much more!
        Injured now or suffer from a chronic injury? You’ll learn how to quickly recover form 6 common running injuries and get back on the
        roads ASAP.
        To celebrate, “Injury-Free Running For Women Over 40” is on sale at a one-time low introductory price of $19.97 …………… and we’re
        including three free bonus reports too!
        Buy the book from the International Association of Women Runners at:
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        For more publications on running and triathlon visit:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/human_kinetics.html and
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/amazon.html
        http://www.runnersweb.com/running/velopress.html

        THIS WEEK'S FEATURES:


        1. The Too-Much-Running Myth Rises Again:
        Risks of an overdose are greatly exaggerated.
        By Alex Hutchinson.
        Stop me if you've heard this one before, but... RUNNING TOO MUCH COULD KILL YOU!!! That's the message of a Wall Street Journal
        article that's making the rounds this week, based on a forthcoming editorial in the journal Heart. Sound familiar? It should,
        because someone writes an article with this message every few months, and it invariably rockets around the cybersphere powered by
        schadenfreude.
        In this case, it should sound extra-familiar, because the Heart editorial is co-written by some of the same team that wrote
        "Cardiovascular damage resulting from chronic excessive endurance exercise" in July, and "Potential adverse cardiovascular effects
        from excessive endurance exercise" in June, not to mention last year's "Exercise like a hunter-gatherer: a prescription for organic
        physical fitness." As cardiologist Paul Thompson says in the WSJ piece, "The guys advancing the hypothesis that you can get too much
        exercise are manipulating the data... They have an agenda."
        Of course, I have an agenda too. I like running, and that inevitably colors my perspective. I posted my thoughts on this topic in
        detail earlier this year, during one of the earlier iterations of this same debate (sparked by essentially the same article by James
        O'Keefe et al. in a different journal). As I said then, there's no doubt whatsoever that the health benefits of aerobic exercise
        eventually reach a point of diminishing returns. Where is that point? No one really knows, but my personal feeling is that if you're
        running more than an hour a day, you're doing it for reasons other than optimizing health. Which is fine. But crucially, that
        doesn't mean you're hurting your health by running an hour a day, and when people start making suggestions like that, I agree with
        Thompson that they're twisting the data.
        More...from Sweat Science at:
        http://www.runnersworld.com/health/too-much-running-myth-rises-again


        2. VO2max - The monthly newsletter of RunCoachJason.com:
        ** Running Form
        I see a lot of runners. And I see a lot of runners running badly. Many of these runners run races. Many of these runners get
        injured training for races. One of the reasons they get injured is because they haven't learned how to run before attempting to
        train for a race. It's like playing in a tennis tournament before learning how to hit a backhand. Learning how to run correctly
        will help prevent injuries and enable you to tolerate greater training loads since you will be undertaking the training with the
        proper skill to do so. If you want to be a better runner, start by running better. To learn proper form, check out this video I
        made with Active.com:
        http://www.active.com/running/articles/5-steps-to-proper-running-form.htm
        ** The power to succeed
        It’s Not What Your Muscles Look Like, It’s What They Do That Matters, Writes Dr Jason Karp.
        Back in the States I often observe playgrounds when I run by, and I’ve heard more than once the familiar boast of youth, “I bet my
        muscles are bigger than your muscles!” These are the words of boys comparing the size of their biceps, showing them off to the
        girls. It’s not uncommon for school cafeterias to turn into venues for arm wrestling, where boys
        challenge one another at the lunch table, the winner getting his opponent’s sandwich. Even as children, we have always been
        fascinated by our muscles.
        At first glance, endurance sports don’t seem to have much to do with big, strong muscles. After all, when was the last time you saw
        a big, muscular distance runner?
        Indeed, the best distance runners in the world are quite small with slim legs and arms. As an endurance athlete, you can still
        benefi t from speed, strength, and power training, as long as you don’t start looking like your sprint counterpart. It’s not what
        your muscles look like – it’s what they do that matters
        More... http://www.runcoachjason.com/PowerTrainingforEndurance.pdf
        To view past newsletters go to: http://www.runcoachjason.com/newsletter
        Copyright 2012 Jason Karp All Rights Reserved - http://www.runcoachjason.com


        3. Burning More Calories Is Easier When Working out With Someone You Perceive as Better:
        The key to motivation in physical activity may be feeling inadequate. One Kansas State University researcher found that those who
        exercised with a teammate whom they perceived to be better increased their workout time and intensity by as much as 200 percent.
        Brandon Irwin, assistant professor of kinesiology, was the principle investigator in a study that tested whether individuals engage
        in more intense physical activity when alone, with a virtual partner or competing against a teammate.
        "People like to exercise with others and make it a social activity," Irwin said. "We found that when you're performing with someone
        who you perceive as a little better than you, you tend to give more effort than you normally would alone."
        More...from Science Daily at:
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121126130938.htm


        4. Taking a Stand for Office Ergonomics:
        THE health studies that conclude that people should sit less, and get up and move around more, have always struck me as fitting into
        the “well, duh” category.
        But a closer look at the accumulating research on sitting reveals something more intriguing, and disturbing: the health hazards of
        sitting for long stretches are significant even for people who are quite active when they’re not sitting down. That point was
        reiterated recently in two studies, published in The British Journal of Sports Medicine and in Diabetologia, a journal of the
        European Association for the Study of Diabetes.
        Suppose you stick to a five-times-a-week gym regimen, as I do, and have put in a lifetime of hard cardio exercise, and have a
        resting heart rate that’s a significant fraction below the norm. That doesn’t inoculate you, apparently, from the perils of sitting.

        More...from the NY Times at:
        http://tinyurl.com/c9jee8h


        5. How To Plan A Breakthrough Season of Running:
        With the New Year approaching the season of giddy goal setting is almost upon us. You know, that short window at the end of the year
        when everyone makes snap resolutions about health, fitness, work, family, diet. Unsurprisingly, the vast majority of these promises
        fail long before we remember to cancel that gym membership…but it doesn’t have to be this way. You can still set lofty goals for
        your season and achieve them, but it takes more than a deadline and peer pressure. It takes some quality planning.
        Five Simple Planning Mistakes that Everyday Runners Make
        If you stop to observe your own running history, or that of your friends, you’ll probably be able to pick up a few quick points on
        thing “not to do” in advance of a big year. Here are a few that come to mind; your own list might be longer!
        * Too Little Too Late — Choosing a late-season race that allows you to procrastinate like a professional for so long that by the
        time the race arrives you have a bigger hill to climb than when you started.
        * Too Much Too Soon — Picking a lofty goal and putting it so close there’s not enough time to train.
        * Last-Minute Mixing — Adding spontaneous events to your schedule in such a way as to undermine your overall training progression.
        * Goal Grabbing — Jumping on the bandwagon of a friend, simply adopting their goal and running out of motivation or desire before
        race day.
        * Chasing Distance Not Fitness — Setting arbitrary targets for long run or training weeks irrespective of your fitness, leading to
        great training benchmarks but sub-optimal racing.
        More...from Marathon Nation at:
        http://www.marathonnation.us/planning-2/how-to-plan-a-breakthrough-season-of-running/


        6. For Athletes, Risks From Ibuprofen Use:
        Many active people use the painkiller ibuprofen on an almost daily basis. In surveys, up to 70 percent of distance runners and other
        endurance athletes report that they down the pills before every workout or competition, viewing the drug as a preemptive strike
        against muscle soreness.
        But a valuable new study joins growing evidence that ibuprofen and similar anti-inflammatory painkillers taken before a workout
        don’t offer any benefit and may be causing disagreeable physical damage instead, particularly to the intestines.
        Studies have already shown that strenuous exercise alone commonly results in a small amount of intestinal trauma. A representative
        experiment published last year found that cyclists who rode hard for an hour immediately developed elevated blood levels of a marker
        that indicates slight gastrointestinal leakage.
        Physiologically, it makes sense that exercise would affect the intestines as it does, since, during prolonged exertion, digestion
        becomes a luxury, said Dr. Kim van Wijck, currently a surgical resident at Orbis Medical Center in the Netherlands, who led the
        small study. So the blood that normally would flow to the small intestine is instead diverted to laboring muscles. Starved of blood,
        some of the cells lining the intestines are traumatized and start to leak.
        More...from the NY Times at:
        http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/05/for-athletes-risks-from-ibuprofen-use/?ref=nutrition


        7. Mental Training To Run and Race Your Best:
        Many runners underestimate the importance of mental training. They experience negative self-talk when faced with a demanding
        workout. When feeling fatigue, they tell themselves that it’s too difficult. They compare themselves to other runners who look
        fitter or faster. They doubt their own ability to complete the training.
        Prior to becoming our coaching client, Kim McClure (Toronto) had done neither speed work nor had run workouts with goal paces.
        During some workouts, she doubted her own ability to maintain her goal pace for the duration of the run. She questioned if she could
        carry out her training.
        Kim stuck with it. She soon realized that the workouts were designed to pinpoint her current thresholds and help her break through
        her self-imposed limits. She correctly concluded that she was not being asked to complete anything she was not capable of.
        Challenging, yet achievable.
        Her tenacity paid off. As a result of overcoming her doubts and completing her challenging program, she approached the start line
        full of confidence. After just three months of training, Kim reduced her half-marathon time by over 10 minutes (from 1:59:45 to
        1:49:18 in the 2011 Hamilton Half-Marathon).
        More...from the IAWR at:
        http://www.iawr-connect.com/training/mental-training-to-run-and-race-your-best/


        8. Tips for Running Outside During Winter:
        Everyone loves a run on a crisp fall morning. The brightly colored leaves provide the backdrop for your run, while the clean, dry
        air fuels a great workout. The temperature is perfect for maximizing your performance.
        But what happens when, inevitably, fall turns to winter? Let's break winter running down to help you deal with the major setbacks
        runners experience during the colder months. Navigating sub-freezing temperatures, snow and ice is difficult for even the most
        winter-ready runner.
        http://tinyurl.com/asxlrdq


        9. Running in Reverse:
        This column appears in the Dec. 9 issue of The New York Times Magazine.
        Backward running, also known as reverse or retro running, is not as celebrated as barefoot running and will never be mistaken for
        the natural way to run. But a small body of science suggests that backward running enables people to avoid or recover from common
        injuries, burn extra calories, sharpen balance and, not least, mix up their daily routine.
        The technique is simple enough. Most of us have done it, at least in a modified, abbreviated form, and probably recently, perhaps
        hopping back from a curb as a bus went by or pushing away from the oven with a roasting pan in both hands. But training with
        backward running is different. Biomechanically, it is forward motion’s doppelgänger. In a study published last year, biomechanics
        researchers at the University of Milan in Italy had a group of runners stride forward and backward at a steady pace along a track
        equipped with force sensors and cameras.
        They found that, as expected, the runners struck the ground near the back of their feet when going forward and rolled onto the front
        of their feet for takeoff. When they went backward though, they landed near the front of their feet and took off from the heels.
        They tended to lean slightly forward even when running backward. As a result, their muscles fired differently. In forward running,
        the muscles and tendons were pulled taut during landing and responded by coiling, a process that creates elastic energy (think
        rubber bands) that is then released during toe-off. When running backward, muscles and tendons were coiled during landing and
        stretched at takeoff. The backward runners’ legs didn’t benefit from stored elastic energy. In fact, the researchers found, running
        backward required nearly 30 percent more energy than running forward at the same speed. But backward running also produced far less
        hard pounding.
        More...from the NY Times at:
        http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/12/06/running-in-reverse/


        10. Dr. Gabe Mirkin's Fitness and Health e-Zine:
        * Healthy Older People Can and Should Compete in Endurance Events
        An editorial in the January 2013 British medical journal, Heart, states that "Running too fast, too far, and for too many
        years may speed one's progress toward the finish line of life." The author bases his opinion on two recent reports presented at
        medical meetings:
        * DISTANCE: One study of 52,600 people followed for 30 years showed that runners had a 19 percent lower death rate than non runners,
        but those who ran more than 25 miles a week did not live longer than non-runners.
        * SPEED: Another study showed that runners who ran slower than eight miles per hour lived longer than non-runners, but those who ran
        faster than 8 MPH did not live longer.
        These two studies are far too limited to make you think that older people should limit how much and how intensely they
        exercise. THEY APPEAR TO SHOW THAT INTENSE OLDER RUNNERS DO NOT GAIN AN ADVANTAGE OVER NON-RUNNERS. THEY DO NOT SHOW THAT RUNNING IS
        HARMING THEM. No reasonable physician should use just this data to recommend limiting exercise in older people. Overwhelming
        evidence shows that exercise helps prevent and treat obesity, high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attacks, strokes, and certain
        cancers, and helps to prolong life.
        I am 77 years old and ride a bicycle more than 200 miles per week, race three times a week at 20 MPH, do interval training
        once a week, and lift weights seven days a week. I have no plans to change my training.
        James H. O'Keefe, a cardiologist in Kansas City who was an elite triathlon athlete, summarizes his concerns about older
        people exercising far and fast (Mayo Clinic Proceedings (June 2012;87(6):587-595). He believes that too much exercise damages the
        heart and arteries by:
        1) causing heart muscle to release enzymes (troponin and B-type
        natriuretic peptide) into the bloodstream, a sign of heart damage.
        2) scarring the heart muscle
        3) increasing calcium plaques in the large arteries
        4) causing irregular heartbeats, in particular atrial fibrillation.
        He is concerned about these findings in spite of the fact that he has no data to show that older exercisers are harmed by
        these changes. Overwhelming data show that exercisers have lower rates of disability and death (Arch Intern Med,
        2008;168(15):1638-1646), and are healthier and live more than seven years longer than non-exercisers (Med Sci Sports Exerc.,
        1993;25(2):237-244).
        REFUTING HIS ARGUMENTS COLLECTIVELY: The apparent heart damage is the same type of muscle damage that is seen in the
        skeletal muscles of trained athletes. Here is why these changes are as beneficial to the heart muscle as they are to the skeletal
        muscles.
        Every serious athlete learns that all training is done by "stressing and recovering". IF YOU WANT TO MAKE A MUSCLE STRONGER,
        YOU HAVE TO EXERCISE SO INTENSELY THAT YOU DAMAGE THAT MUSCLE. Then when the muscle heals, it is stronger than before it was
        damaged. So, knowledgeable athletes:
        * Take a hard workout that damages their skeletal muscles. They know this because they feel burning during exercise, and soreness in
        their muscles eight to 24 hours after this intense workout.
        * Then they take less intense workouts for as many days as it takes for the muscles to heal and the soreness to go away. If they do
        not take easier workouts on the days when their muscles are sore, they often injure themselves.
        So workouts for knowledgeable athletes in all sports typically alternate one or more days of intense workouts with as many
        easy workouts as needed to allow recovery.
        REFUTING EACH POINT INDIVIDUALLY:
        1) HEART MUSCLE RELEASES ENZYMES (TROPONIN AND B-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEPTIDE) INTO THE BLOODSTREAM, A SIGN OF HEART DAMAGE:
        This is the training effect that you expect from proper exercise training. If you don't "damage" a skeletal muscle, it will not
        become stronger. If you don't "damage" the heart muscle, it will not become stronger. These enzymes that leak from the heart muscle
        into the bloodstream return to normal in less than a week, in the same manner that enzymes from damaged skeletal muscles return to
        normal in the same amount of time.
        2) SCARRING OF THE HEART MUSCLE: The "scarring" of heart muscle is the same as the scarring in skeletal muscles. It
        disappears after the muscle heals and is necessary for muscles to become stronger. (Refer to the parts of muscles in the picture at
        http://www.ucl.ac.uk/~sjjgsca/MuscleSarcomere.gif ). Skeletal muscles are composed of thousands of muscle fibers. Each fiber is
        a long rope made up of a series of thousands of similar blocks called sarcomeres, lined end to end to form a long chain. Each block
        attaches to the next sarcomere at the "Z line". Muscles function by shortening a little bit at each of the thousands of "Z lines".
        The "Z lines" all shorten simultaneously and the entire
        muscle then can contract. The "Z lines" are where muscles are damaged. It is damage to these "Z lines that causes muscle growth
        after healing, which makes muscles stronger.
        3) INCREASED CALCIUM PLAQUES IN THE LARGE ARTERIES: Plaques in arteries may have more to do with the diet of endurance
        athletes than their exercise programs. High mileage athletes burn far more calories each day than do casual exercisers.
        Therefore, they have to eat far more food in order to have the energy to power their muscles during training. The extra food that
        athletes eat is likely to contain far more saturated fat, sugar, high glycemic-load foods, red meat, sugared drinks, and calories.
        All of these food components can increase the formation of plaques in arteries. Therefore, it is probably the increased intake of
        plaque- forming foods, and not the extra mileage, that may negate
        some of the benefits of long and hard exercise. Athletes who eat huge amounts of food and restrict these unhealthful components
        should have almost no plaques at all. I think that future studies will demonstrate that the increased deposition of plaques has
        nothing to do with running more miles or faster miles.
        4) IRREGULAR HEART BEATS, IN PARTICULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION:
        At this time, we do not know if there really is an increased risk for irregular heartbeats in endurance athletes. All we know is
        that older competitive athletes suffer from irregular heartbeats just as younger athletes and non-athletes do. Furthermore, we have
        no evidence that older athletes are at increased risk for the harmful side effects of irregular heartbeats: fainting, accidents or
        sudden death.
        The main concern about atrial fibrillation is that the patients are at increased risk for clotting in general and strokes in
        particular. However, nobody has shown that older endurance athletes with atrial fibrillation are at increased risk for clotting or
        strokes.
        Dr. O'Keefe himself writes: "Sudden cardiac death among marathoners is very rare, with one event per 100,000 participants."
        Here are two of his references: Med Sci Sports
        Exerc. 2012;44(6):990-994; N Engl J Med . 2012;366(2):130-140.
        BENEFITS OF ENDURANCE EXERCISE IN ALL AGE GROUPS: Dr O'Keefe is completely honest and reasonable in listing the following
        ways exercise helps to prevent and treat heart attacks:
        * Increases the good HDL cholesterol
        * lowers triglycerides
        * treats obesity
        * lowers high blood pressure
        * Improves insulin sensitivity
        * lowers blood sugar
        * strengthens arteries
        * helps with smoking cessation
        * reduces psychological stress
        * lowers hematocrit and blood viscosity
        * expands blood volume
        * prevents clotting
        * increases blood flow to the heart
        * increases collateral circulation to the heart
        * increases tolerance of decreased blood flow to the heart
        * reduces atherosclerosis
        * enlarges arteries leading to the heart
        * reduces major sickness and death
        MY LAST WORD ON THE SUBJECT: I am 77 years old and plan to continue riding my bicycle 200 miles a week.
        Note: I have sent this to the Wall Street Journal in response to their article, "One Running Shoe in the Grave",November 27,
        2012.
        From Dr Gabe Mirkin at:
        http://www.drmirkin.com


        11. The Benefits of a Killer Training Week:
        Super-loading your training once a month can pay off, a new study finds.
        By Alex Hutchinson.
        Published December 04, 2012. Many cross-country teams have annual training camps where they gather in some remote location for a few
        days to do crazy amounts of running at crazy intensities. This has always seemed to me to be sort of, well, crazy. But a recent
        study that Amby Burfoot mentioned on Twitter got me thinking.
        The study is by researchers in Norway, published in the Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, and it deals with what
        they call "block periodization." The basic gist of their theory seems to be that if you're trying to do everything at once in any
        given training week (i.e. easy miles, speed work, threshold work, etc.), you can't put enough emphasis on any one of the elements to
        really push to a new level. This is a particular problem for already-well-trained endurance athletes, who have already taken all the
        "easy" adaptations that occur when you first start training.
        More...from Sweat Science at:
        http://www.runnersworld.com/workouts/benefits-killer-training-week


        12. Protein Linking Exercise to Bigger, Stronger Muscles Discovered:
        Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have isolated a previously unknown protein in muscles that spurs their growth and
        increased power following resistance exercise. They suggest that artificially raising the protein's levels might someday help
        prevent muscle loss caused by cancer, prolonged inactivity in hospital patients, and aging.
        Mice given extra doses of the protein gained muscle mass and strength, and rodents with cancer were much less affected by cachexia,
        the loss of muscle that often occurs in cancer patients, according to the report in the Dec. 7 issue of the journal Cell.
        "This is basic science at present," commented Jorge Ruas, PhD, first author of the report. "But if you could find a way to elevate
        levels of this protein, that would be very exciting. For example, you might be able to reduce muscle wasting in patients in
        intensive care units whose muscles atrophy because of prolonged bed rest." Other applications, he said, might be in disorders such
        as muscular dystrophy and the gradual loss of muscle mass from aging.
        More...from Science Daily at:
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/12/121206121728.htm


        13. Improve your VO2 Max:
        All aerobic endurance activities, like running, bicycling, swimming, and cross-country skiing, are essentially contests to see how
        much oxygen your body can deliver to your exercising muscles. Increase the amount of oxygen, and you can run, bike, swim, or ski
        faster.
        In running, of course, those muscles are in your legs. As you train, two things happen to improve your muscles' ability to use
        oxygen. First, your heart gets stronger and delivers more oxygen; and second, your leg muscles get better at using the oxygen.
        In their laboratory research, scientists frequently measure this delivery and use of oxygen, calling it maximum oxygen uptake or VO2
        max. They consider maximum oxygen uptake to be the most basic measure of aerobic fitness, and they've shown that it increases as you
        train more and harder. I generally reverse the letter order, since max VO2 has a friendlier sound than VO2 max.
        More...from the Sport Factory at:
        http://thesportfactory.com/site/trainingnews/improvevo2max.shtml


        14. Running Too Far, Too Fast, and Too Long Speeds Progress 'to Finish Line of Life':
        Vigorous exercise is good for health, but only if it's limited to a maximum daily dose of between 30 and 50 minutes, say
        researchers in an editorial published online in Heart.
        The idea that more and more high intensity exercise, such as marathons, can only do you good, is a myth say the US cardiologists,
        and the evidence shows that it's likely to more harm than good to your heart.
        "If you really want to do a marathon or full distance triathlon, etc, it may be best to do just one or a few and then proceed to
        safer and healthier exercise patterns," they warn.
        "A routine of moderate physical activity will add life to your years as well as years to your life. In contrast, running too far,
        too fast, and for too many years may speed one's progress to towards the finishing line of life."
        More...from Science Daily at:
        http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/11/121129143456.htm


        15. Weird Stuff That Works:
        A look at some of the innovative products in this wonderful, weird new world. Running used to be easy. Left, right, repeat. It still
        is.
        What Will They Think of Next?
        You can head out the door anytime, outfitted with nothing but shorts and shoes.
        The shoes alone, however, seem to be returning to simpler profiles of years gone by. Everything else has gotten more complicated.
        The latest tinkering, applied to our training, recovery, the air that we breathe and the blood that circulates inside our veins, can
        make the sport resemble something out of an MIT lab.
        Not surprisingly, it's the elite athletes, from Galen Rupp to Lauren Fleshman, who've been the earliest adopters of the newest
        running technology. Lucky for us, their fun--and sometimes wacky--new toys are quickly becoming accessible to all.
        More...from Runner's World at:
        http://www.runnersworld.com/photos/weird-stuff-works


        THIS WEEK'S FEATURED EVENTS:
        *Please verify event dates with the event websites available from our FrontPage
        (www.runnersweb.com)

        December 8, 2012:
        Tucson Marathon, Tucson, AZ

        December 9, 2012:
        Holiday Half-Marathon, 5K, Kids Fun Run - Pomona, CA

        Honolulu Marathon - Hawaii

        MetroPCS Dallas Marathon - Dallas, TX
        Formerly the Dallas White Rock Marathon

        Santa to the Sea Half-Marathon, Relay, 5K - Oxnard, CA

        Tucson Marathon - Tucson, AZ

        (Inaugural) Woman's Half Marathon & 10K - Baton Rouge, LA

        June 22, 2013
        Emilie's Run - The Emilie Mondor Memorial 5K Race for Women
        http://www.emiliesrun.com

        For more complete race listings check out our Upcoming Races, and Calendars.
        Check the Runner's Web on Sunday and Monday for race reports on these events at:
        http://www.runnersweb.com/

        Send this to a Friend:
        Forward the Runner's Web Digest to a friend and suggest that they subscribe at:
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        YOUR FEEDBACK AND COMMENTS:
        Comments, contributions and feedback are always welcome via this list at:
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        Have a good week of training and/or racing.

        Ken

        Ken Parker
        www.RunnersWeb.com
        The Running and Triathlon Resource Portal
        mailto:kparker@...
        613-746-4053
        http://www.OACRacingTeam.com
        http://www.EmiliesRun.com

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