Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

M-W.com's Word of the Day

Expand Messages
  • punstress
    Thought you all might be interested in the word of the day for the 4th of July from Merriam Webster: The Word of the Day for July 04 is: rapier RAY-pee-er
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 5, 2005
      Thought you all might be interested in the word of the day for the
      4th of July from Merriam Webster:

      The Word of the Day for July 04 is:

      rapier \RAY-pee-er\ adjective

      : extremely sharp or keen

      Example sentence:
      In the June 1992 issue of Field & Stream magazine, Dave Hughes
      offered the following fly-fishing advice: "In one fluid motion, lift
      the rod up and back, and drive it forward with a rapier thrust."

      Did you know?
      A rapier is a straight, two-edged sword with a narrow pointed blade,
      designed especially for thrusting. According to Encyclopædia
      Britannica, "the long rapier was beautifully balanced, excellent in
      attack, and superb for keeping an opponent at a distance." The word
      itself, which we borrowed in the 16th century, is from Middle
      French "rapiere." (It has no connection to the word "rape.") The
      first time that "rapier" was used as an adjective in its
      figurative "cutting" sense, it described a smile: "Who can bear a
      rapier smile? A kiss that dooms the soul to death?" ("The Lover's
      Lament" by Sumner Lincoln Fairfield, 1824). Wit was first described
      as "rapier-like" by an author in 1853, and, these days, the most
      common use of the adjective "rapier" is to describe wit.

      *Indicates the sense illustrated in the example sentence.
    • Simon el Martillo de Cordoba
      ... wrote: The word ... In typical spanish haughtiness, I would argue that the word MAY also come from the spanish , Espada ropera or
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 6, 2005
        --- In RoyalGuildofDefense@yahoogroups.com, "punstress"
        <punstress@g...> wrote:

        <snip>The word
        > itself, which we borrowed in the 16th century, is from Middle
        > French "rapiere." (It has no connection to the word "rape.") <snip>

        ====

        :) gotta chime in on this one.

        In typical spanish haughtiness, I would argue that the word MAY also
        come from the spanish , "Espada ropera" or (cloak sword) used in in
        the mid 1500's

        :)


        Simón
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.