Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: [RoyalGuildofDefense] Re: Yes!

Expand Messages
  • Randy & Beth Berry
    Thank you Kevin and Staffan for sharing your thoughts, ideas and encouraging additional ways we can work in our period studies. As many of us are still in the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 16, 2006
      Thank you Kevin and Staffan for sharing your thoughts, ideas and
      encouraging additional ways we can work in our period studies. As many
      of us are still in the learning curve on period manuals in various areas
      (geographical) of the Kingdom, these ideas help and encourage others to
      take a stab at it.

      As taken from our charter, "The Royal Guild of Fence was established for
      the promotion and teaching of rapier combat within the West Kingdom. The
      Guild is a recognized organization for the training and development of
      period fencing." and further "are empowered to promote, teach and serve
      all manner of things that pertain to the good ordering of the practice
      of the Period Arte and Science of Rapier Combat within the Kingdom of
      the West." So while we support Rapier combat in the West, we want to
      promote the study of Historical practices and share that knowledge with
      others. As we've seen in this discussion there are various ways we can
      do that.

      I agree that in a workshop you may only be able to pick up on one or two
      concepts at that time and need to keep working away at it. One
      suggestion for activities at events would be to focus on one item, say a
      study of the Buckler and what diGrassi has to say concerning the use of
      that style. Run a short work shop and then sponsor a tourney in that
      form, so everyone has a chance to work with it. Just one suggestion.

      Brigit, I know you've done research on women through our times. Have
      you had a chance to see what is out there about information on female
      rapier fighters and say stories found about them. That could be a cool
      subject for a social and still be within our focus of studying and
      promoting the historical aspect. It doesn't always need to be about the
      hands on aspect of how we do things, there is also the history that we
      can share.

      Great stuff! Thanks.
      Sorcha Careman
      LGM
    • David Falcon
      ... Falcone ... No, we did not finish the plate by plate walk through of CF. Mostly this was due to the horrendous run of bad weather that seemed as if it was
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 16, 2006
        --- In RoyalGuildofDefense@yahoogroups.com, Cerridwen Coedwig
        <cerridwen@...> wrote:
        >
        > I have the book too. "Making" the folks at our practice go through
        > anything is not very likely.
        >
        > We have several people who have been around for a while. David
        Falcone
        > was going through Capo Ferro plate by plate, but I don't think the
        > process was completed........

        No, we did not finish the plate by plate walk through of CF. Mostly
        this was due to the horrendous run of bad weather that seemed as if
        it was never going to end. But I have not pushed to continue the
        sessions as I began to fully appreciate that the CF book is more a
        set of drills than it is a tutorial. Drills are what you do to
        reinforce, and commit to muscle memory, the precepts that you have
        already learned at least intellectually. And while the CF drills can
        be used as an adjunct to teaching the precepts, it is of limited
        usefulness, and can even be counterproductive, to members of the
        group who do not have a full grasp of the precepts the drills are
        intended to refine.
        Doing one plate a week as a goal is not, in my opinion, useful to
        those who are trying to learn to fence (though It may be useful to
        those who already have a good grounding in another system and want to
        gain an over view of CF).
        For those who are not already well grounded in the basic concepts of
        fencing, I believe, the instructor needs to spend as much time on the
        basic moves and concepts as are required rather than attempting to
        finish CF in any given time frame or order. I would also add the
        wisdom of learning even a small number of moves perfectly over
        learning a book full of moves imperfectly.
        So, I doubt I will ever again attempt to "go through" CF, or any
        other manuscript, as a part of a practice.
        I do think that it is possible to teach CF as a system, and this
        presupposes extrapolating a lot from what the instructor already
        knows of the basics of fencing, but I don't see "doing the plates" as
        the way to do it.

        David
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.