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Re: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] Huntsville..cost/benefit rationalization of life?

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  • Michael Mulligan
    Why do I fear a nuclear power plant accident...especially one that gives only a small release of off site radiation...because it has the probability of killing
    Message 1 of 24 , Nov 30, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Why do I fear a nuclear power plant accident...especially one
      that gives only a small release of off site
      radiation...because it has the probability of killing off 25%
      of our domestic electric production....immediate price
      spikes...inability for a decade to make up for the production
      lost...and of course, it may be our hat trick with global
      warming and domestic energy production in a national
      emergency. It really worries me!

      I don’t think we will see the master nuclear disaster...it
      will be the little one with limited release.

      thanks,

      mike




      From the Magazine | Cover
      http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1562978-1,00.html

      Why We Worry About The Things We Shouldn't... ...And Ignore
      The Things We Should

      Nation

      http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1564465,00.html?cnn=yes

      The Hidden Danger of Seat Belts
      “For the sake of argument, offers Adams, imagine how it might
      affect the behavior of drivers if a sharp stake were mounted
      in the middle of the steering wheel? Or if the bumper were
      packed with explosives.”

      --- Michael Mulligan <steamshovel2002@...> wrote:

      > Amazing, the only reason the bus driver is alive...is he
      > broke
      > a law by not wearing a seat belt....I can’t remember if they
      > said the bus was rolling over as it was riding the wall. The
      > bus had mounted the wall for 115 feet after smacking
      > it!...is
      > that why the brakes weren’t applied...he smacked the wall
      > which dislodged him from the seat and ejected him out of the
      > bus during the first few seconds.
      >
      > The boy probably didn’t have the skills to know the symptoms
      > of an impending steering failure or the money to fix
      > it....why
      > no state vehicle inspection....the kid only had it for 5
      > weeks.
      >
      >
      http://www.al.com/news/huntsvilletimes/index.ssf?/base/news/116470923588350.xml&coll=1&thispage=1
      >
      > Probe eyes steering failure
      > Car malfunction could have caused bus crash; teen driver
      > threatened
      > Tuesday, November 28, 2006
      > By KEITH CLINES
      > Times Staff Writer keith.clines@...
      > A malfunction in the steering system of a car involved in a
      > fatal school bus crash last week may have been a factor in
      > causing the wreck, a federal official said Monday night.
      > Reynolds said "police investigators feel comfortable at this
      > time to say that there was no deliberate erratic driving on
      > the part of the driver of the Celica prior to the accident"
      > based on statements from witnesses not involved in the
      > accident.
      > Scott, the bus driver, was not wearing a seat belt and was
      > ejected from his seat by the force of the impact with the
      > wall, Van Etten said. Scott hit the bus doors with such
      > force
      > that it forced the doors open and he fell into the road, he
      > said.
      > Scott violated Laidlaw policy and state law by not wearing
      > his
      > seat belt, Van Etten and Reynolds said. Scott was hired by
      > Laidlaw in 2001 and had no previous violations, they said.
      >
      > --- Michael Mulligan <steamshovel2002@...> wrote:
      >
      > > You can’t read any newspaper in Alabama today without
      > > noticing
      > > this:
      > >
      >
      http://www.al.com/news/birminghamnews/index.ssf?/base/news/1164622795293820.xml&coll=2
      > >
      > > Alabama suffers engineer shortage
      > >
      > > Education officials consider high school programs to
      > offset
      > > retiring Baby Boomers
      > > Monday, November 27, 2006
      > > LIZ ELLABY
      > > News staff writer
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > We’d have to take a look at the weight and design
      > > consideration of this new model bus versus an older
      > design.
      > > Did they do crash testing of the bus with all sorts of
      > > barrier
      > > designs.
      > >
      > > Why don’t we remove all crash barriers on causeways and
      > > elevated highways....say design the roads such that the
      > > break
      > > down lanes outer edges are at a much lower elevation than
      > > the
      > > road itself and coated with Teflon...that we can remove an
      > > errant driver and vehicle from the roadway immediately?
      > What
      > > are we going to do about rubber necking?
      > >
      > > On all my travels on the roads...I’d seen a lot of
      > accidents
      > > on the roads...and approached stopped traffic in the
      > middle
      > > of
      > > the interstates all the time....had to stomp on the brakes
      > > really hard a few times... and I’ve never seen a chain
      > > reaction once. I think they are very rare...but your
      > getting
      > > me real close to making a value judgment on a cost/benefit
      > > tradeoff.
      > >
      > > Yep...how do you communicate to the police that somebody
      > is
      > > harassing you on the road with a car if you are a bus
      > > driver....and get a immediate responce.
      > >
      > > thanks,
      > >
      > > mike
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > --- "Edens, Gary P" <gpedens@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Can we say for sure that a higher wall would have caused
      > > > less deaths? Or would a higher wall have caused the bus
      > > to
      > > > flip on its side or cause a chain reaction accident
      > > > involving more vehicles and resulting in more deaths?
      > Has
      > > > the installation of guard rails resulted in more or less
      > > > deaths? And the answer my root cause instructor always
      > > > gives is "depends".
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > From: Michael Mulligan
      > > > Sent: Fri 11/24/2006 15:31
      > > > To: Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice@yahoogroups.com
      > > > Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice]
      > > > Huntsville..cost/benefit rationalization of life?
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > We need a philosopher more for this than a civil or
      > > > transportation engineer here. I just believe we are
      > going
      > > > down
      > > > a slippery slope when we intentionally value one human
      > > being
      > > > over another...especially when we are talking about a
      > > > illusory
      > > > resource limitations...because in the end, it will
      > always
      > > be
      > > > the powerless and weak who get the short end of the
      > stick.
      > > > In
      > > > a democracy, it just might end up being the super rich
      > we
      > > > choose as punishment without a having a moral
      > > justification.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Just looking at the cost/benefit rationalization through
      > > one
      > > > lens is fundamentally unethical. So for an equivalent
      > > > accident
      > > > with a car or truck...the way we purchase our highway
      > > > infrastructure through our philosophical
      > > > rationalizations...the car driver would more survive a
      > > crash
      > > > than a truck driver...one life is valued more than the
      > > other
      > > > in our spending priorities...or in this case an innocent
      > > > child
      > > > would more pay the price of our cost/benefit
      > > > rationalizations.
      > > > We end up choosing what life is worth more versus a
      > > benefit
      > > > to
      > > > society as a whole?
      > > >
      > > > I wonder how much a truck pays in state and federal
      > > taxes...
      > > > shouldn't the safety design of a highway consider the
      > > > vehicle
      > > > tax rate?
      > > >
      > > > How about a single young women's preventable death
      > versus
      > > > the
      > > > preventable death of a truck driver? Can't you imagine
      > all
      > > > the
      > > > freight this guy would haul over a lifetime and it's
      > > > implication for our "just in time" economy...you got a
      > > huge
      > > > societal benefit there and a deepening driver shortage.
      > I
      > > > guess women can only have babies....I am just trying to
      > > > contrast the insane way we rationalize the value of
      > > > life...don't get me talking about how we horribly value
      > > the
      > > > lives of our disabled population. Is it true that
      > societal
      > > > ...we place a 1.5 to 2 million dollar meaning to the
      > value
      > > > of
      > > > life...while the World Trade Towers valued life on our
      > > > income
      > > > levels and status.
      > > >
      > > > So I don't still get it; I've been on interstate's with
      > > very
      > > > little day and night time traffic, then been on extreme
      > > > traffic within I-95 between NYC and Hartford...Do we
      > vary
      >
      === message truncated ===




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    • Jack Stanford
      Well, we pretty much agree on this one, though it is more like ~ 20%. Like you say, just look at what TMI-2 prevented in power plant production. I know a guy
      Message 2 of 24 , Dec 1, 2006
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        Well, we pretty much agree on this one, though it is more like ~ 20%.  Like you say, just look at what TMI-2 prevented in power plant production.  I know a guy who was on watch at Unit 2 at the time, BTW.  He told me ALL about the numerous congressional hearing, etc.
         
        Jack Stanford
        210 Old Chester Road
        Haddam, CT  06438
         
        PWR SRO 10218
        CT PE 14191
        Six Sigma Green Belt Cert.
         
        StanfordJ@...
        860-345-4344
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2006 8:39 PM
        Subject: Re: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] Huntsville..cost/benefit rationalization of life?

        Why do I fear a nuclear power plant accident...especial ly one
        that gives only a small release of off site
        radiation... because it has the probability of killing off 25%
        of our domestic electric production.. ..immediate price
        spikes...inability for a decade to make up for the production
        lost...and of course, it may be our hat trick with global
        warming and domestic energy production in a national
        emergency. It really worries me!

        I don’t think we will see the master nuclear disaster...it
        will be the little one with limited release.

        thanks,

        mike

        From the Magazine | Cover
        http://www.time. com/time/ magazine/ article/0, 9171,1562978- 1,00.html

        Why We Worry About The Things We Shouldn't... ...And Ignore
        The Things We Should

        Nation

        http://www.time. com/time/ nation/article/ 0,8599,1564465, 00.html?cnn= yes

        The Hidden Danger of Seat Belts
        “For the sake of argument, offers Adams, imagine how it might
        affect the behavior of drivers if a sharp stake were mounted
        in the middle of the steering wheel? Or if the bumper were
        packed with explosives.”

        --- Michael Mulligan <steamshovel2002@ yahoo.com> wrote:

        > Amazing, the only reason the bus driver is alive...is he
        > broke
        > a law by not wearing a seat belt....I can’t remember if they
        > said the bus was rolling over as it was riding the wall. The
        > bus had mounted the wall for 115 feet after smacking
        > it!...is
        > that why the brakes weren’t applied...he smacked the wall
        > which dislodged him from the seat and ejected him out of the
        > bus during the first few seconds.
        >
        > The boy probably didn’t have the skills to know the symptoms
        > of an impending steering failure or the money to fix
        > it....why
        > no state vehicle inspection.. ..the kid only had it for 5
        > weeks.
        >
        >
        http://www.al. com/news/ huntsvilletimes/ index.ssf? /base/news/ 116470923588350. xml&coll= 1&thispage= 1
        >
        > Probe eyes steering failure
        > Car malfunction could have caused bus crash; teen driver
        > threatened
        > Tuesday, November 28, 2006
        > By KEITH CLINES
        > Times Staff Writer keith.clines@ htimes.com
        > A malfunction in the steering system of a car involved in a
        > fatal school bus crash last week may have been a factor in
        > causing the wreck, a federal official said Monday night.
        > Reynolds said "police investigators feel comfortable at this
        > time to say that there was no deliberate erratic driving on
        > the part of the driver of the Celica prior to the accident"
        > based on statements from witnesses not involved in the
        > accident.
        > Scott, the bus driver, was not wearing a seat belt and was
        > ejected from his seat by the force of the impact with the
        > wall, Van Etten said. Scott hit the bus doors with such
        > force
        > that it forced the doors open and he fell into the road, he
        > said.
        > Scott violated Laidlaw policy and state law by not wearing
        > his
        > seat belt, Van Etten and Reynolds said. Scott was hired by
        > Laidlaw in 2001 and had no previous violations, they said.
        >
        > --- Michael Mulligan <steamshovel2002@ yahoo.com> wrote:
        >
        > > You can’t read any newspaper in Alabama today without
        > > noticing
        > > this:
        > >
        >
        http://www.al. com/news/ birminghamnews/ index.ssf? /base/news/ 1164622795293820 .xml&coll= 2
        > >
        > > Alabama suffers engineer shortage
        > >
        > > Education officials consider high school programs to
        > offset
        > > retiring Baby Boomers
        > > Monday, November 27, 2006
        > > LIZ ELLABY
        > > News staff writer
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > We’d have to take a look at the weight and design
        > > consideration of this new model bus versus an older
        > design.
        > > Did they do crash testing of the bus with all sorts of
        > > barrier
        > > designs.
        > >
        > > Why don’t we remove all crash barriers on causeways and
        > > elevated highways.... say design the roads such that the
        > > break
        > > down lanes outer edges are at a much lower elevation than
        > > the
        > > road itself and coated with Teflon...that we can remove an
        > > errant driver and vehicle from the roadway immediately?
        > What
        > > are we going to do about rubber necking?
        > >
        > > On all my travels on the roads...I’d seen a lot of
        > accidents
        > > on the roads...and approached stopped traffic in the
        > middle
        > > of
        > > the interstates all the time....had to stomp on the brakes
        > > really hard a few times... and I’ve never seen a chain
        > > reaction once. I think they are very rare...but your
        > getting
        > > me real close to making a value judgment on a cost/benefit
        > > tradeoff.
        > >
        > > Yep...how do you communicate to the police that somebody
        > is
        > > harassing you on the road with a car if you are a bus
        > > driver....and get a immediate responce.
        > >
        > > thanks,
        > >
        > > mike
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- "Edens, Gary P" <gpedens@duke- energy.com> wrote:
        > >
        > > > Can we say for sure that a higher wall would have caused
        > > > less deaths? Or would a higher wall have caused the bus
        > > to
        > > > flip on its side or cause a chain reaction accident
        > > > involving more vehicles and resulting in more deaths?
        > Has
        > > > the installation of guard rails resulted in more or less
        > > > deaths? And the answer my root cause instructor always
        > > > gives is "depends".
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > From: Michael Mulligan
        > > > Sent: Fri 11/24/2006 15:31
        > > > To: Root_Cause_State_ of_the_Practice@ yahoogroups. com
        > > > Subject: [Root_Cause_ State_of_ the_Practice]
        > > > Huntsville.. cost/benefit rationalization of life?
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > We need a philosopher more for this than a civil or
        > > > transportation engineer here. I just believe we are
        > going
        > > > down
        > > > a slippery slope when we intentionally value one human
        > > being
        > > > over another...especiall y when we are talking about a
        > > > illusory
        > > > resource limitations. ..because in the end, it will
        > always
        > > be
        > > > the powerless and weak who get the short end of the
        > stick.
        > > > In
        > > > a democracy, it just might end up being the super rich
        > we
        > > > choose as punishment without a having a moral
        > > justification.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Just looking at the cost/benefit rationalization through
        > > one
        > > > lens is fundamentally unethical. So for an equivalent
        > > > accident
        > > > with a car or truck...the way we purchase our highway
        > > > infrastructure through our philosophical
        > > > rationalizations. ..the car driver would more survive a
        > > crash
        > > > than a truck driver...one life is valued more than the
        > > other
        > > > in our spending priorities.. .or in this case an innocent
        > > > child
        > > > would more pay the price of our cost/benefit
        > > > rationalizations.
        > > > We end up choosing what life is worth more versus a
        > > benefit
        > > > to
        > > > society as a whole?
        > > >
        > > > I wonder how much a truck pays in state and federal
        > > taxes...
        > > > shouldn't the safety design of a highway consider the
        > > > vehicle
        > > > tax rate?
        > > >
        > > > How about a single young women's preventable death
        > versus
        > > > the
        > > > preventable death of a truck driver? Can't you imagine
        > all
        > > > the
        > > > freight this guy would haul over a lifetime and it's
        > > > implication for our "just in time" economy...you got a
        > > huge
        > > > societal benefit there and a deepening driver shortage.
        > I
        > > > guess women can only have babies....I am just trying to
        > > > contrast the insane way we rationalize the value of
        > > > life...don't get me talking about how we horribly value
        > > the
        > > > lives of our disabled population. Is it true that
        > societal
        > > > ...we place a 1.5 to 2 million dollar meaning to the
        > value
        > > > of
        > > > life...while the World Trade Towers valued life on our
        > > > income
        > > > levels and status.
        > > >
        > > > So I don't still get it; I've been on interstate's with
        > > very
        > > > little day and night time traffic, then been on extreme
        > > > traffic within I-95 between NYC and Hartford...Do we
        > vary
        >
        === message truncated ===

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      • Michael Mulligan
        Interesting take on the DMV and bus drivers? School Bus Driver Beat System http://www.courant.com/hc-fountain1201.artdec01,0,5353097.story DMV Halts Licensing
        Message 3 of 24 , Dec 2, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Interesting take on the DMV and bus drivers?

          School Bus Driver Beat System
          http://www.courant.com/hc-fountain1201.artdec01,0,5353097.story

          DMV Halts Licensing In Wake Of Accident That Killed Pedestrian

          December 1, 2006
          By KATIE MELONE, Courant Staff Writer
          .....................................................




          GAO report on NTSB

          http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d07118.pdf


          NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD
          Progress Made, Yet Management Practices, Investigation
          Priorities, and Training Center Use Should Be Improved


          While NTSB has recently made progress in following leading
          management practices, its overall use of leading management
          practices in the seven areas GAO examined was either minimal
          or partial. NTSB minimally follows leading practices in
          strategic planning, information technology, and knowledge
          management. NTSB partially follows leading practices in human
          capital management, communications, acquisition management,
          and financial accountability and control. For example,
          regarding human capital management, NTSB developed a detailed
          staffing plan. However, the agency lacks a strategic training
          plan and a diversity management strategy, which are important
          for ensuring that an organization has strategies for achieving
          the appropriate mix of skills to achieve its mission. In
          addition, while NTSB follows some leading practices for
          financial management, it is noncompliant with the
          Anti-Deficiency Act because it did not obtain budget authority
          for the net present value of the entire 20-year lease for its
          training center lease obligation at the time the lease
          agreement was signed in 2001.
          NTSB carries out its transportation safety function by
          selecting which accidents to investigate, investigating
          accidents and issuing recommendations, and taking proactive
          steps outside of specific accidents. For some transportation
          modes, NTSB has risk-based criteria for selecting which
          accidents to investigate, while for others it does not. Such
          criteria are important to ensure NTSB is using its resources
          to achieve a maximum safety benefit, particularly because, by
          statute, NTSB must allocate a large proportion of its
          resources to investigating aviation accidents, which may
          reduce the number of staff that NTSB can use to investigate
          accidents in other modes that may have critical safety
          implications. To its credit, although accident investigations
          are sometimes lengthy, NTSB issues urgent recommendations
          during the course of an investigation. In addition, NTSB
          proactively carries out its mission by conducting safety
          studies to consider issues that may be relevant to more than
          one accident. Safety studies, which sometimes result in
          recommendations, may also reduce the likelihood of recurrence
          of transportation accidents. Over the last 6 years, NTSB has
          conducted four safety studies. Industry stakeholders stated
          they would like NTSB to conduct more safety studies.
          NTSB’s training center is not cost-effective, as the
          combination of the training center’s revenues and external
          training costs avoided by NTSB staff’s use of the facility do
          not cover the center’s costs. In fiscal year 2005, costs
          exceeded revenues by $3.9 million. Furthermore, the training
          center has had a limited impact on avoiding external training
          costs, as the majority of NTSB staff training occurs
          externally. Potential strategies to increase revenues or
          decrease costs could increase the cost-effectiveness of the
          training center; however, vacating the space may be the
          least-cost strategy. What GAO Recommends ........





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        • Michael Mulligan
          Not enough NTSB effort on tranportation activities?
          Message 4 of 24 , Dec 2, 2006
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            Not enough NTSB effort on tranportation activities?


            HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML?HP&EX=1165122000&EN=60F6E12C02FD6A8E&EI=5094&PARTNER=HOMEPAGE


            LOOSENING THE RULES
            As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies
            In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers were
            allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required to
            rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours could
            be used for other work activities, like loading, or for breaks
            or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
            consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce those
            rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
            Once you end your 10 hour rest period...you can go back
            driving...it’s becomes 18 hour day...so its not a 10 hour rest
            for ever 24 hour period. In your 60 or 70 hour work week...all
            you need is 36 hour off...1.5 days....and your weekly hours
            are reset beck to zero....come in Saturday morning and leave
            Sunday night.






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          • Dr. Bill Corcoran
            Mike, This is a great topic. Your link doesn t work. Can you paste the article into an e-mail? Take care, Bill Corcoran W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E. NSRC
            Message 5 of 24 , Dec 2, 2006
            • 0 Attachment
              Mike,
               
              This is a great topic.
               
              Your link doesn't work.
               
              Can you paste the article into an e-mail?
               
              Take care,
               
              Bill Corcoran
               
              W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
              NSRC Corporation
              21 Broadleaf Circle
              Windsor, CT 06095-1634
              Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
              Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
              Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through thoughtful inquiry.
              Motto: If you want safety, peace, or justice, then work for competency, integrity, and transparency.
               
              Call or e-mail me to ask about the three day Root Cause Analysis Training Workshop in Atlanta, GA, March 13-15, 2007.
              It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
               
               
              For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to firebird.one@...
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 3:49 PM
              Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?


              Not enough NTSB effort on transportation activities?

              HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES. COM/2006/ 12/03/WASHINGTON /03TRUCKS. HTML?HP&EX= 1165122000& EN=60F6E12C02FD6 A8E&EI=5094& PARTNER=HOMEPAGE

              LOOSENING THE RULES
              As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies
              In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers were
              allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required to
              rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours could
              be used for other work activities, like loading, or for breaks
              or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
              consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce those
              rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
              Once you end your 10 hour rest period...you can go back
              driving...it’ s becomes 18 hour day...so its not a 10 hour rest
              for ever 24 hour period. In your 60 or 70 hour work week...all
              you need is 36 hour off...1.5 days....and your weekly hours
              are reset beck to zero....come in Saturday morning and leave
              Sunday night.

              ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
              Cheap talk?
              Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
              http://voice. yahoo.com

            • Michael Mulligan
              HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML?HP&EX=1165208400&EN=46859BC52D0EC868&EI=5094&PARTNER=HOMEPAGE LOOSENING THE RULES As Trucking Rules
              Message 6 of 24 , Dec 3, 2006
              • 0 Attachment
                HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML?HP&EX=1165208400&EN=46859BC52D0EC868&EI=5094&PARTNER=HOMEPAGE


                LOOSENING THE RULES
                As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies
                _____________________________________
                December 3, 2006
                As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Grows
                By STEPHEN LABATON
                WASHINGTON, Dec. 2 — As Dorris Edwards slowed for traffic near
                Kingdom City, Mo., on her way home from a Thanksgiving trip in
                2004, an 18-wheeler slammed into her Jeep Cherokee.
                The truck crushed the sport-utility vehicle and shoved it down
                an embankment off Interstate 70. Ms. Edwards, 62, was killed.
                The truck driver accepted blame for the accident, and Ms.
                Edwards’s family filed a lawsuit against the driver and the
                trucking company.
                In the course of pursuing its case, the family broached a
                larger issue: whether the Bush administration’s decision to
                reject tighter industry regulation and instead reduce what
                officials viewed as cumbersome rules permitted a poorly
                trained trucker to stay behind the wheel, alone, instead of
                resting after a long day of driving.
                After intense lobbying by the politically powerful trucking
                industry, regulators a year earlier had rejected proposals to
                tighten drivers’ hours and instead did the opposite, relaxing
                the rules on how long truckers could be on the road. That
                allowed the driver who hit Ms. Edwards to work in the cab
                nearly 12 hours, 8 of them driving nonstop, which he later
                acknowledged had tired him.
                Government officials had also turned down repeated requests
                from insurers and safety groups for more rigorous training for
                new drivers. The driver in the fatal accident was a rookie on
                his first cross-country trip; his instructor, a 22-year-old
                with just a year of trucking experience, had been sleeping in
                a berth behind the cab much of the way.
                Federal officials, while declining to comment about the
                Edwards accident, have dismissed the assertion that
                deregulation has reduced safety and have maintained that in
                fact it has helped, though the Edwards family and many other
                victims of accidents have come to the opposite conclusion.
                In loosening the standards, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety
                Administration was fulfilling President Bush’s broader pledge
                to free industry of what it considered cumbersome rules. In
                the last six years, the White House has embarked on the
                boldest strategy of deregulation in more than a generation.
                Largely unchecked by the Republican-led Congress, federal
                agencies, often led by former industry officials, have
                methodically reduced what they see as inefficient, outdated
                regulations and have delayed enforcement of others. The Bush
                administration says those efforts have produced huge savings
                for businesses and consumers.
                Those actions, though, have provoked fierce debate about their
                benefits and risks. The federal government’s oversight of the
                trucking industry is a case study of deregulation, as well as
                the difficulty of determining an exact calculus of its
                consequences. Though Ms. Edwards’s family and the industry
                disagree on whether the motor carrier agency’s actions
                contributed to her death, her accident illuminates crucial
                issues in regulating America’s most treacherous industry, as
                measured by overall deaths and injuries from truck accidents.
                The loosened standards, supporters say, have made it faster
                and cheaper to move goods across the country. They also say
                the changes promote safety; without longer work hours, the
                industry would be forced to put more drivers with little
                experience behind the wheel. Regulators and industry officials
                point out that the death toll of truck-related accidents —
                about 5,000 annually — has not increased, while the fatality
                rate, the number of deaths per miles traveled, has continued a
                long decline. The number of annual injuries has also been
                dropping slowly, falling to 114,000 last year.
                “This administration has done a good job, and the agency has
                done a good job, in advancing safety issues in a manner that
                takes into account all the important factors of our industry,”
                said the top lobbyist for the American Trucking Associations,
                Timothy P. Lynch.
                But advocates of tighter rules say the administration’s record
                of loosening standards endangers motorists. The fatality rate
                for truck-related accidents remains nearly double that
                involving only cars, safety and insurance groups say. They
                note that weakening the rules has reversed a course set by the
                Clinton administration and has resulted in the federal
                government repeatedly missing its own targets for reducing the
                death rate.
                “It is a frustrating disappointment that has led to a tragic
                era,” said David F. Snyder, an assistant general counsel at
                the American Insurance Association who follows the trucking
                industry closely. “The losses continue to pile up at a high
                rate. There has been a huge missed opportunity.”
                An Industry’s Influence
                In decisions that had the support of the White House, the
                motor carrier agency has eased the rules on truckers’ work
                hours, rejected proposals for electronic monitoring to combat
                widespread cheating on drivers’ logs and resisted calls for
                more rigorous driver training.
                While applauded by the industry, those decisions have been
                subject to withering criticism by federal appeals court panels
                in Washington who say they ignore government safety studies
                and put the industry’s economic interests ahead of public
                safety.
                To advance its agenda, the Bush administration has installed
                industry officials in influential posts.
                Before Mr. Bush entered the White House, he selected Duane W.
                Acklie, a leading political fund-raiser and chairman of the
                American Trucking Associations, and Walter B. McCormick Jr.,
                the group’s president, to serve on the Bush-Cheney transition
                team on transportation matters.
                Mr. Bush then appointed Michael P. Jackson, a former top
                official at the trucking associations, as deputy secretary of
                the Department of Transportation. To lead the Federal Motor
                Carrier Safety Administration, the president picked Joseph M.
                Clapp, the former chairman of Roadway, a trucking company, and
                the leader of an industry foundation that sponsored research
                claiming fatigue was not a factor in truck accidents, a
                conclusion at odds with government and academic studies.
                And David S. Addington, a former trucking industry official
                who led an earlier fight against tougher driving limits,
                became legal counsel and later chief of staff to Vice
                President Dick Cheney, an advocate of easing government
                regulations.
                In addition to supplying prominent administration officials,
                the trucking industry has provided some of the Republican
                party’s most important fund-raisers. From 2000 to 2006, the
                industry directed more than $14 million in campaign
                contributions to Republicans. Its donations and lobbying fees
                — about $37 million from 2000 to 2005 — led to rules that have
                saved what industry officials estimate are billions of dollars
                in expenses linked to tougher regulations.
                But to the families of accident victims, the motor carrier
                agency has failed to fulfill a promise to significantly reduce
                fatalities, exacting a tragic personal price.
                “They are not getting much done in Washington,” said Daphne
                Izer of Maine, who founded Parents Against Tired Truckers in
                1994 after a Wal-Mart driver fell asleep at the wheel of his
                rig, killing her son and three other teenagers in the car with
                him. “As a result, more people will continue to die.”
                Federal regulators disagree with that assessment of their
                performance. “We have made significant progress, yet much work
                remains to achieve our vision,” said David H. Hugel, the new
                deputy administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety
                Administration. “Our challenges also are increasing because
                our nation maintains the most extensive and complex
                transportation system in the world, and that system and number
                of people who use it continues to grow.”
                The federal government began overseeing the trucking industry
                in the 1930s, setting rates, limiting competition and
                regulating safety practices. From the start, companies won
                important concessions from Washington, including exemptions
                from minimum wage and other labor laws. The industry also
                resisted efforts to impose tougher safety standards, saying it
                could police itself.
                In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers were
                allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required to
                rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours could
                be used for other work activities, like loading, or for breaks
                or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
                consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce those
                rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
                Repeated efforts over the years to tighten the rules were
                blocked, often as a result of vigorous industry lobbying.
                Trucking companies have long argued that tougher standards are
                not necessary to promote safety, and that they would cause
                devastating economic pressures. Profit margins in the industry
                are thin, particularly after economic deregulation in 1980
                prompted competition. Long hours and low pay for drivers have
                led to high turnover, and carriers struggle to find
                replacements. Those conditions, safety experts say, have
                contributed to widespread safety problems.
                The practice of falsifying driver hours is an open secret in
                the industry; truckers routinely refer to their logs as “comic
                books.” Fines are small. The federal motor carrier agency does
                not have the staff to monitor closely 700,000 businesses and
                almost eight million trucks.
                Timothy L. Unrine, a 41-year-old driver from Virginia, said in
                a recent interview that he was taught to conceal excessive
                driving hours during training last January by his former
                employer, Boyd Brothers Transportation of Birmingham, Ala. Mr.
                Unrine said his orientation instructor told his class that
                government inspectors were allowed to examine a monthly
                logbook if it was bound. But if the staples were removed, the
                log was considered “loose leaf” and inspectors could require
                an examination of only those pages from the most recent seven
                days, Mr. Unrine said the drivers were told.




                ____________________________________________________________________________________
                Any questions? Get answers on any topic at www.Answers.yahoo.com. Try it now.
              • Michael Mulligan
                So you work 14 hours...go off the clock for 10 hours...work 14, off 10.... It’s on the front page of the Sunday New York Times...Dec 3, 2006. I don’t like
                Message 7 of 24 , Dec 3, 2006
                • 0 Attachment
                  So you work 14 hours...go off the clock for 10 hours...work
                  14, off 10....

                  It’s on the front page of the Sunday New York Times...Dec 3,
                  2006.


                  I don’t like the term “accidents per million miles”....we need
                  to talk about how we generate “per million miles” and its
                  accuracy.

                  I think its function is to devalue the meaning of human
                  life...our deaths and suffering coming from our driving.

                  It's an easy number to "game".

                  Thanks,

                  mike



                  Americans driving less for first time in 25 years
                  Gasoline prices cited


                  http://www.cfnews13.com/StoryHeadline.aspx?id=20759


                  Americans Driving Less
                  The high price of gas not only had more drivers looking
                  towards alternative fuels and smaller cars, but for the first
                  time in 25 years Americans drove less.
                  The drop in driving was small, the average American drove
                  13,657 miles per year in 2005, down from 13,711 miles in 2004.
                  However, it is more evidence that the market works and prices
                  help control consumption, Boston-based Cambridge Energy
                  Research Associates said.


                  --- "Dr. Bill Corcoran" <williamcorcoran@...> wrote:

                  > Mike,
                  >
                  > This is a great topic.
                  >
                  > Your link doesn't work.
                  >
                  > Can you paste the article into an e-mail?
                  >
                  > Take care,
                  >
                  > Bill Corcoran
                  >
                  > W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
                  > NSRC Corporation
                  > 21 Broadleaf Circle
                  > Windsor, CT 06095-1634
                  > Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
                  > Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
                  > Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through
                  > thoughtful inquiry.
                  > Motto: If you want safety, peace, or justice, then work for
                  > competency, integrity, and transparency.
                  >
                  > Call or e-mail me to ask about the three day Root Cause
                  > Analysis Training Workshop in Atlanta, GA, March 13-15,
                  > 2007.
                  > It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
                  >
                  >
                  > For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root
                  > cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to
                  > firebird.one@...
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: Michael Mulligan
                  > To: Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice@yahoogroups.com
                  > Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 3:49 PM
                  > Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As Trucking
                  > Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Not enough NTSB effort on transportation activities?
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML?HP&EX=1165122000&EN=60F6E12C02FD6A8E&EI=5094&PARTNER=HOMEPAGE
                  >
                  > LOOSENING THE RULES
                  > As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety
                  > Intensifies
                  > In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers
                  > were
                  > allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required
                  > to
                  > rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours
                  > could
                  > be used for other work activities, like loading, or for
                  > breaks
                  > or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
                  > consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce
                  > those
                  > rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
                  > Once you end your 10 hour rest period...you can go back
                  > driving...it's becomes 18 hour day...so its not a 10 hour
                  > rest
                  > for ever 24 hour period. In your 60 or 70 hour work
                  > week...all
                  > you need is 36 hour off...1.5 days....and your weekly
                  > hours
                  > are reset beck to zero....come in Saturday morning and
                  > leave
                  > Sunday night.
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________________
                  > Cheap talk?
                  > Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                  > http://voice.yahoo.com
                  >
                  >
                  >




                  ____________________________________________________________________________________
                  Do you Yahoo!?
                  Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                  http://new.mail.yahoo.com
                • Jack Stanford
                  Understand what you are saying, Mike (I think), but... If you don t want per million miles what do you want? Please identify problems AND offer solutions.
                  Message 8 of 24 , Dec 3, 2006
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Understand what you are saying, Mike (I think), but...
                     
                    If you don't want "per million miles" what do you want?   Please identify problems AND offer solutions.   Truck accidents involving significant injury (definition?) or death(s) per capita is another way to look at it all.  But either way, it is a moniker. 
                     
                    To me, the issue of tracking is not that complicated.  Track accidents (such as commercial trucks) per unit of a given highway and focus on those with a high incidence.  Examples:  I-70 in Missouri.  I-395 in CT, and so on...
                     
                    I believe that the issue is less the number of accidents per million miles driven and more WHERE THEY HAPPEN, WHEN, etc.
                     
                    Rules for drivers (including rest time) should receive the same focus that they receive for operators of commercial nuclear power plants as both have the ability to cause extreme risk if in a deprived state of rest.
                     
                    Jack Stanford
                    210 Old Chester Road
                    Haddam, CT  06438
                     
                    PWR SRO 10218
                    CT PE 14191
                    Six Sigma Green Belt Cert.
                     
                    StanfordJ@...
                    860-345-4344
                     
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 12:05 PM
                    Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?

                    So you work 14 hours...go off the clock for 10 hours...work
                    14, off 10....

                    It’s on the front page of the Sunday New York Times...Dec 3,
                    2006.

                    I don’t like the term “accidents per million miles”....we need
                    to talk about how we generate “per million miles” and its
                    accuracy.

                    I think its function is to devalue the meaning of human
                    life...our deaths and suffering coming from our driving.

                    It's an easy number to "game".

                    Thanks,

                    mike

                    Americans driving less for first time in 25 years
                    Gasoline prices cited

                    http://www.cfnews13 .com/StoryHeadli ne.aspx?id= 20759


                    Americans Driving Less
                    The high price of gas not only had more drivers looking
                    towards alternative fuels and smaller cars, but for the first
                    time in 25 years Americans drove less.
                    The drop in driving was small, the average American drove
                    13,657 miles per year in 2005, down from 13,711 miles in 2004.
                    However, it is more evidence that the market works and prices
                    help control consumption, Boston-based Cambridge Energy
                    Research Associates said.

                    --- "Dr. Bill Corcoran" <williamcorcoran@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                    > Mike,
                    >
                    > This is a great topic.
                    >
                    > Your link doesn't work.
                    >
                    > Can you paste the article into an e-mail?
                    >
                    > Take care,
                    >
                    > Bill Corcoran
                    >
                    > W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
                    > NSRC Corporation
                    > 21 Broadleaf Circle
                    > Windsor, CT 06095-1634
                    > Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
                    > Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
                    > Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through
                    > thoughtful inquiry.
                    > Motto: If you want safety, peace, or justice, then work for
                    > competency, integrity, and transparency.
                    >
                    > Call or e-mail me to ask about the three day Root Cause
                    > Analysis Training Workshop in Atlanta, GA, March 13-15,
                    > 2007.
                    > It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
                    >
                    >
                    > For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root
                    > cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to
                    > firebird.one@ alum.MIT. edu
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: Michael Mulligan
                    > To: Root_Cause_State_ of_the_Practice@ yahoogroups. com
                    > Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 3:49 PM
                    > Subject: [Root_Cause_ State_of_ the_Practice] As Trucking
                    > Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Not enough NTSB effort on transportation activities?
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES. COM/2006/ 12/03/WASHINGTON /03TRUCKS. HTML?HP&EX= 1165122000& EN=60F6E12C02FD6 A8E&EI=5094& PARTNER=HOMEPAGE
                    >
                    > LOOSENING THE RULES
                    > As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety
                    > Intensifies
                    > In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers
                    > were
                    > allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required
                    > to
                    > rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours
                    > could
                    > be used for other work activities, like loading, or for
                    > breaks
                    > or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
                    > consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce
                    > those
                    > rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
                    > Once you end your 10 hour rest period...you can go back
                    > driving...it' s becomes 18 hour day...so its not a 10 hour
                    > rest
                    > for ever 24 hour period. In your 60 or 70 hour work
                    > week...all
                    > you need is 36 hour off...1.5 days....and your weekly
                    > hours
                    > are reset beck to zero....come in Saturday morning and
                    > leave
                    > Sunday night.
                    >
                    > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                    > Cheap talk?
                    > Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                    > http://voice. yahoo.com
                    >
                    >
                    >

                    ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                    Do you Yahoo!?
                    Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
                    http://new.mail. yahoo.com

                  • Jack Stanford
                    Mike, I clicked on the address below and the message I got (twice) was that it does not exist. Jack Stanford 210 Old Chester Road Haddam, CT 06438 PWR SRO
                    Message 9 of 24 , Dec 3, 2006
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Mike,
                       
                      I clicked on the address below and the message I got (twice) was that it does not exist.
                       
                      Jack Stanford
                      210 Old Chester Road
                      Haddam, CT  06438
                       
                      PWR SRO 10218
                      CT PE 14191
                      Six Sigma Green Belt Cert.
                       
                      StanfordJ@...
                      860-345-4344
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 11:42 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?

                      HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES. COM/2006/ 12/03/WASHINGTON /03TRUCKS. HTML?HP&EX= 1165208400& EN=46859BC52D0EC 868&EI=5094& PARTNER=HOMEPAGE

                      LOOSENING THE RULES
                      As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies
                      ____________ _________ _________ _______
                      December 3, 2006
                      As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Grows
                      By STEPHEN LABATON
                      WASHINGTON, Dec. 2 — As Dorris Edwards slowed for traffic near
                      Kingdom City, Mo., on her way home from a Thanksgiving trip in
                      2004, an 18-wheeler slammed into her Jeep Cherokee.
                      The truck crushed the sport-utility vehicle and shoved it down
                      an embankment off Interstate 70. Ms. Edwards, 62, was killed.
                      The truck driver accepted blame for the accident, and Ms.
                      Edwards’s family filed a lawsuit against the driver and the
                      trucking company.
                      In the course of pursuing its case, the family broached a
                      larger issue: whether the Bush administration’ s decision to
                      reject tighter industry regulation and instead reduce what
                      officials viewed as cumbersome rules permitted a poorly
                      trained trucker to stay behind the wheel, alone, instead of
                      resting after a long day of driving.
                      After intense lobbying by the politically powerful trucking
                      industry, regulators a year earlier had rejected proposals to
                      tighten drivers’ hours and instead did the opposite, relaxing
                      the rules on how long truckers could be on the road. That
                      allowed the driver who hit Ms. Edwards to work in the cab
                      nearly 12 hours, 8 of them driving nonstop, which he later
                      acknowledged had tired him.
                      Government officials had also turned down repeated requests
                      from insurers and safety groups for more rigorous training for
                      new drivers. The driver in the fatal accident was a rookie on
                      his first cross-country trip; his instructor, a 22-year-old
                      with just a year of trucking experience, had been sleeping in
                      a berth behind the cab much of the way.
                      Federal officials, while declining to comment about the
                      Edwards accident, have dismissed the assertion that
                      deregulation has reduced safety and have maintained that in
                      fact it has helped, though the Edwards family and many other
                      victims of accidents have come to the opposite conclusion.
                      In loosening the standards, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety
                      Administration was fulfilling President Bush’s broader pledge
                      to free industry of what it considered cumbersome rules. In
                      the last six years, the White House has embarked on the
                      boldest strategy of deregulation in more than a generation.
                      Largely unchecked by the Republican-led Congress, federal
                      agencies, often led by former industry officials, have
                      methodically reduced what they see as inefficient, outdated
                      regulations and have delayed enforcement of others. The Bush
                      administration says those efforts have produced huge savings
                      for businesses and consumers.
                      Those actions, though, have provoked fierce debate about their
                      benefits and risks. The federal government’s oversight of the
                      trucking industry is a case study of deregulation, as well as
                      the difficulty of determining an exact calculus of its
                      consequences. Though Ms. Edwards’s family and the industry
                      disagree on whether the motor carrier agency’s actions
                      contributed to her death, her accident illuminates crucial
                      issues in regulating America’s most treacherous industry, as
                      measured by overall deaths and injuries from truck accidents.
                      The loosened standards, supporters say, have made it faster
                      and cheaper to move goods across the country. They also say
                      the changes promote safety; without longer work hours, the
                      industry would be forced to put more drivers with little
                      experience behind the wheel. Regulators and industry officials
                      point out that the death toll of truck-related accidents —
                      about 5,000 annually — has not increased, while the fatality
                      rate, the number of deaths per miles traveled, has continued a
                      long decline. The number of annual injuries has also been
                      dropping slowly, falling to 114,000 last year.
                      “This administration has done a good job, and the agency has
                      done a good job, in advancing safety issues in a manner that
                      takes into account all the important factors of our industry,”
                      said the top lobbyist for the American Trucking Associations,
                      Timothy P. Lynch.
                      But advocates of tighter rules say the administration’ s record
                      of loosening standards endangers motorists. The fatality rate
                      for truck-related accidents remains nearly double that
                      involving only cars, safety and insurance groups say. They
                      note that weakening the rules has reversed a course set by the
                      Clinton administration and has resulted in the federal
                      government repeatedly missing its own targets for reducing the
                      death rate.
                      “It is a frustrating disappointment that has led to a tragic
                      era,” said David F. Snyder, an assistant general counsel at
                      the American Insurance Association who follows the trucking
                      industry closely. “The losses continue to pile up at a high
                      rate. There has been a huge missed opportunity.”
                      An Industry’s Influence
                      In decisions that had the support of the White House, the
                      motor carrier agency has eased the rules on truckers’ work
                      hours, rejected proposals for electronic monitoring to combat
                      widespread cheating on drivers’ logs and resisted calls for
                      more rigorous driver training.
                      While applauded by the industry, those decisions have been
                      subject to withering criticism by federal appeals court panels
                      in Washington who say they ignore government safety studies
                      and put the industry’s economic interests ahead of public
                      safety.
                      To advance its agenda, the Bush administration has installed
                      industry officials in influential posts.
                      Before Mr. Bush entered the White House, he selected Duane W.
                      Acklie, a leading political fund-raiser and chairman of the
                      American Trucking Associations, and Walter B. McCormick Jr.,
                      the group’s president, to serve on the Bush-Cheney transition
                      team on transportation matters.
                      Mr. Bush then appointed Michael P. Jackson, a former top
                      official at the trucking associations, as deputy secretary of
                      the Department of Transportation. To lead the Federal Motor
                      Carrier Safety Administration, the president picked Joseph M.
                      Clapp, the former chairman of Roadway, a trucking company, and
                      the leader of an industry foundation that sponsored research
                      claiming fatigue was not a factor in truck accidents, a
                      conclusion at odds with government and academic studies.
                      And David S. Addington, a former trucking industry official
                      who led an earlier fight against tougher driving limits,
                      became legal counsel and later chief of staff to Vice
                      President Dick Cheney, an advocate of easing government
                      regulations.
                      In addition to supplying prominent administration officials,
                      the trucking industry has provided some of the Republican
                      party’s most important fund-raisers. From 2000 to 2006, the
                      industry directed more than $14 million in campaign
                      contributions to Republicans. Its donations and lobbying fees
                      — about $37 million from 2000 to 2005 — led to rules that have
                      saved what industry officials estimate are billions of dollars
                      in expenses linked to tougher regulations.
                      But to the families of accident victims, the motor carrier
                      agency has failed to fulfill a promise to significantly reduce
                      fatalities, exacting a tragic personal price.
                      “They are not getting much done in Washington,” said Daphne
                      Izer of Maine, who founded Parents Against Tired Truckers in
                      1994 after a Wal-Mart driver fell asleep at the wheel of his
                      rig, killing her son and three other teenagers in the car with
                      him. “As a result, more people will continue to die.”
                      Federal regulators disagree with that assessment of their
                      performance. “We have made significant progress, yet much work
                      remains to achieve our vision,” said David H. Hugel, the new
                      deputy administrator of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety
                      Administration. “Our challenges also are increasing because
                      our nation maintains the most extensive and complex
                      transportation system in the world, and that system and number
                      of people who use it continues to grow.”
                      The federal government began overseeing the trucking industry
                      in the 1930s, setting rates, limiting competition and
                      regulating safety practices. From the start, companies won
                      important concessions from Washington, including exemptions
                      from minimum wage and other labor laws. The industry also
                      resisted efforts to impose tougher safety standards, saying it
                      could police itself.
                      In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers were
                      allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required to
                      rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours could
                      be used for other work activities, like loading, or for breaks
                      or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
                      consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce those
                      rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
                      Repeated efforts over the years to tighten the rules were
                      blocked, often as a result of vigorous industry lobbying.
                      Trucking companies have long argued that tougher standards are
                      not necessary to promote safety, and that they would cause
                      devastating economic pressures. Profit margins in the industry
                      are thin, particularly after economic deregulation in 1980
                      prompted competition. Long hours and low pay for drivers have
                      led to high turnover, and carriers struggle to find
                      replacements. Those conditions, safety experts say, have
                      contributed to widespread safety problems.
                      The practice of falsifying driver hours is an open secret in
                      the industry; truckers routinely refer to their logs as “comic
                      books.” Fines are small. The federal motor carrier agency does
                      not have the staff to monitor closely 700,000 businesses and
                      almost eight million trucks.
                      Timothy L. Unrine, a 41-year-old driver from Virginia, said in
                      a recent interview that he was taught to conceal excessive
                      driving hours during training last January by his former
                      employer, Boyd Brothers Transportation of Birmingham, Ala. Mr.
                      Unrine said his orientation instructor told his class that
                      government inspectors were allowed to examine a monthly
                      logbook if it was bound. But if the staples were removed, the
                      log was considered “loose leaf” and inspectors could require
                      an examination of only those pages from the most recent seven
                      days, Mr. Unrine said the drivers were told.

                      ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                      Any questions? Get answers on any topic at www.Answers. yahoo.com. Try it now.

                    • Michael Mulligan
                      Jack, I don’t get it...this is the third change they made on the address of this article. HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML
                      Message 10 of 24 , Dec 4, 2006
                      • 0 Attachment
                        Jack,

                        I don’t get it...this is the third change they made on the
                        address of this article.


                        HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML

                        LOOSENING THE RULES
                        As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies


                        --- Jack Stanford <jack.stanford@...> wrote:

                        > Mike,
                        >
                        > I clicked on the address below and the message I got (twice)
                        > was that it does not exist.
                        >
                        > Jack Stanford
                        > 210 Old Chester Road
                        > Haddam, CT 06438
                        >
                        > PWR SRO 10218
                        > CT PE 14191
                        > Six Sigma Green Belt Cert.
                        >
                        > StanfordJ@...
                        > 860-345-4344
                        >
                        >
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: Michael Mulligan
                        > To: Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice@yahoogroups.com
                        > Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 11:42 AM
                        > Subject: Re: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As
                        > Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES.COM/2006/12/03/WASHINGTON/03TRUCKS.HTML?HP&EX=1165208400&EN=46859BC52D0EC868&EI=5094&PARTNER=HOMEPAGE
                        >
                        > LOOSENING THE RULES
                        > As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety
                        > Intensifies
                        > _____________________________________
                        > December 3, 2006
                        > As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Grows
                        > By STEPHEN LABATON
                        > WASHINGTON, Dec. 2 - As Dorris Edwards slowed for traffic
                        > near
                        > Kingdom City, Mo., on her way home from a Thanksgiving
                        > trip in
                        > 2004, an 18-wheeler slammed into her Jeep Cherokee.
                        > The truck crushed the sport-utility vehicle and shoved it
                        > down
                        > an embankment off Interstate 70. Ms. Edwards, 62, was
                        > killed.
                        > The truck driver accepted blame for the accident, and Ms.
                        > Edwards's family filed a lawsuit against the driver and
                        > the
                        > trucking company.
                        > In the course of pursuing its case, the family broached a
                        > larger issue: whether the Bush administration's decision
                        > to
                        > reject tighter industry regulation and instead reduce what
                        > officials viewed as cumbersome rules permitted a poorly
                        > trained trucker to stay behind the wheel, alone, instead
                        > of
                        > resting after a long day of driving.
                        > After intense lobbying by the politically powerful
                        > trucking
                        > industry, regulators a year earlier had rejected proposals
                        > to
                        > tighten drivers' hours and instead did the opposite,
                        > relaxing
                        > the rules on how long truckers could be on the road. That
                        > allowed the driver who hit Ms. Edwards to work in the cab
                        > nearly 12 hours, 8 of them driving nonstop, which he later
                        > acknowledged had tired him.
                        > Government officials had also turned down repeated
                        > requests
                        > from insurers and safety groups for more rigorous training
                        > for
                        > new drivers. The driver in the fatal accident was a rookie
                        > on
                        > his first cross-country trip; his instructor, a
                        > 22-year-old
                        > with just a year of trucking experience, had been sleeping
                        > in
                        > a berth behind the cab much of the way.
                        > Federal officials, while declining to comment about the
                        > Edwards accident, have dismissed the assertion that
                        > deregulation has reduced safety and have maintained that
                        > in
                        > fact it has helped, though the Edwards family and many
                        > other
                        > victims of accidents have come to the opposite conclusion.
                        > In loosening the standards, the Federal Motor Carrier
                        > Safety
                        > Administration was fulfilling President Bush's broader
                        > pledge
                        > to free industry of what it considered cumbersome rules.
                        > In
                        > the last six years, the White House has embarked on the
                        > boldest strategy of deregulation in more than a
                        > generation.
                        > Largely unchecked by the Republican-led Congress, federal
                        > agencies, often led by former industry officials, have
                        > methodically reduced what they see as inefficient,
                        > outdated
                        > regulations and have delayed enforcement of others. The
                        > Bush
                        > administration says those efforts have produced huge
                        > savings
                        > for businesses and consumers.
                        > Those actions, though, have provoked fierce debate about
                        > their
                        > benefits and risks. The federal government's oversight of
                        > the
                        > trucking industry is a case study of deregulation, as well
                        > as
                        > the difficulty of determining an exact calculus of its
                        > consequences. Though Ms. Edwards's family and the industry
                        > disagree on whether the motor carrier agency's actions
                        > contributed to her death, her accident illuminates crucial
                        > issues in regulating America's most treacherous industry,
                        > as
                        > measured by overall deaths and injuries from truck
                        > accidents.
                        > The loosened standards, supporters say, have made it
                        > faster
                        > and cheaper to move goods across the country. They also
                        > say
                        > the changes promote safety; without longer work hours, the
                        > industry would be forced to put more drivers with little
                        > experience behind the wheel. Regulators and industry
                        > officials
                        > point out that the death toll of truck-related accidents -
                        > about 5,000 annually - has not increased, while the
                        > fatality
                        > rate, the number of deaths per miles traveled, has
                        > continued a
                        > long decline. The number of annual injuries has also been
                        > dropping slowly, falling to 114,000 last year.
                        > "This administration has done a good job, and the agency
                        > has
                        > done a good job, in advancing safety issues in a manner
                        > that
                        > takes into account all the important factors of our
                        > industry,"
                        > said the top lobbyist for the American Trucking
                        > Associations,
                        > Timothy P. Lynch.
                        > But advocates of tighter rules say the administration's
                        > record
                        > of loosening standards endangers motorists. The fatality
                        > rate
                        > for truck-related accidents remains nearly double that
                        > involving only cars, safety and insurance groups say. They
                        > note that weakening the rules has reversed a course set by
                        > the
                        > Clinton administration and has resulted in the federal
                        > government repeatedly missing its own targets for reducing
                        > the
                        > death rate.
                        > "It is a frustrating disappointment that has led to a
                        > tragic
                        > era," said David F. Snyder, an assistant general counsel
                        > at
                        > the American Insurance Association who follows the
                        > trucking
                        > industry closely. "The losses continue to pile up at a
                        > high
                        > rate. There has been a huge missed opportunity."
                        > An Industry's Influence
                        > In decisions that had the support of the White House, the
                        > motor carrier agency has eased the rules on truckers' work
                        > hours, rejected proposals for electronic monitoring to
                        > combat
                        > widespread cheating on drivers' logs and resisted calls
                        > for
                        > more rigorous driver training.
                        > While applauded by the industry, those decisions have been
                        > subject to withering criticism by federal appeals court
                        > panels
                        > in Washington who say they ignore government safety
                        > studies
                        > and put the industry's economic interests ahead of public
                        > safety.
                        > To advance its agenda, the Bush administration has
                        > installed
                        > industry officials in influential posts.
                        > Before Mr. Bush entered the White House, he selected Duane
                        > W.
                        > Acklie, a leading political fund-raiser and chairman of
                        > the
                        > American Trucking Associations, and Walter B. McCormick
                        > Jr.,
                        > the group's president, to serve on the Bush-Cheney
                        > transition
                        > team on transportation matters.
                        > Mr. Bush then appointed Michael P. Jackson, a former top
                        > official at the trucking associations, as deputy secretary
                        > of
                        > the Department of Transportation. To lead the Federal
                        > Motor
                        > Carrier Safety Administration, the president picked Joseph
                        > M.
                        > Clapp, the former chairman of Roadway, a trucking company,
                        > and
                        > the leader of an industry foundation that sponsored
                        > research
                        > claiming fatigue was not a factor in truck accidents, a
                        > conclusion at odds with government and academic studies.
                        >
                        === message truncated ===




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                      • Dr. Bill Corcoran
                        Mike, What do the regulations require? Why don t they work? How should they be changed? Where to the Teamsters stand on this? Take care, Bill Corcoran W. R.
                        Message 11 of 24 , Dec 4, 2006
                        • 0 Attachment
                          Mike,
                           
                          What do the regulations require?
                           
                          Why don't they work?
                           
                          How should they be changed?
                           
                          Where to the Teamsters stand on this?
                           
                          Take care,
                           
                          Bill Corcoran
                           
                          W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
                          NSRC Corporation
                          21 Broadleaf Circle
                          Windsor, CT 06095-1634
                          Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
                          Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
                          Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through thoughtful inquiry.
                          Motto: If you want safety, peace, or justice, then work for competency, integrity, and transparency.
                           
                          Call or e-mail me to ask about the three day Root Cause Analysis Training Workshop in Atlanta, GA, March 13-15, 2007.
                          It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
                           
                           
                          For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to firebird.one@...
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 12:05 PM
                          Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?

                          So you work 14 hours...go off the clock for 10 hours...work
                          14, off 10....

                          It’s on the front page of the Sunday New York Times...Dec 3,
                          2006.

                          I don’t like the term “accidents per million miles”....we need
                          to talk about how we generate “per million miles” and its
                          accuracy.

                          I think its function is to devalue the meaning of human
                          life...our deaths and suffering coming from our driving.

                          It's an easy number to "game".

                          Thanks,

                          mike

                          Americans driving less for first time in 25 years
                          Gasoline prices cited

                          http://www.cfnews13 .com/StoryHeadli ne.aspx?id= 20759


                          Americans Driving Less
                          The high price of gas not only had more drivers looking
                          towards alternative fuels and smaller cars, but for the first
                          time in 25 years Americans drove less.
                          The drop in driving was small, the average American drove
                          13,657 miles per year in 2005, down from 13,711 miles in 2004.
                          However, it is more evidence that the market works and prices
                          help control consumption, Boston-based Cambridge Energy
                          Research Associates said.

                          --- "Dr. Bill Corcoran" <williamcorcoran@ sbcglobal. net> wrote:

                          > Mike,
                          >
                          > This is a great topic.
                          >
                          > Your link doesn't work.
                          >
                          > Can you paste the article into an e-mail?
                          >
                          > Take care,
                          >
                          > Bill Corcoran
                          >
                          > W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
                          > NSRC Corporation
                          > 21 Broadleaf Circle
                          > Windsor, CT 06095-1634
                          > Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
                          > Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
                          > Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through
                          > thoughtful inquiry.
                          > Motto: If you want safety, peace, or justice, then work for
                          > competency, integrity, and transparency.
                          >
                          > Call or e-mail me to ask about the three day Root Cause
                          > Analysis Training Workshop in Atlanta, GA, March 13-15,
                          > 2007.
                          > It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
                          >
                          >
                          > For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root
                          > cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to
                          > firebird.one@ alum.MIT. edu
                          > ----- Original Message -----
                          > From: Michael Mulligan
                          > To: Root_Cause_State_ of_the_Practice@ yahoogroups. com
                          > Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2006 3:49 PM
                          > Subject: [Root_Cause_ State_of_ the_Practice] As Trucking
                          > Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety Intensifies?
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > Not enough NTSB effort on transportation activities?
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          HTTP://WWW.NYTIMES. COM/2006/ 12/03/WASHINGTON /03TRUCKS. HTML?HP&EX= 1165122000& EN=60F6E12C02FD6 A8E&EI=5094& PARTNER=HOMEPAGE
                          >
                          > LOOSENING THE RULES
                          > As Trucking Rules Are Eased, a Debate on Safety
                          > Intensifies
                          > In 1937, the first driving hour limits were set. Truckers
                          > were
                          > allowed drive up to 10 continuous hours but were required
                          > to
                          > rest for a minimum of 8 hours. The remaining six hours
                          > could
                          > be used for other work activities, like loading, or for
                          > breaks
                          > or meals. Truckers could drive up to 60 hours over 7
                          > consecutive days, or 70 hours over 8 days. To enforce
                          > those
                          > rules, the government required drivers to keep logs.
                          > Once you end your 10 hour rest period...you can go back
                          > driving...it' s becomes 18 hour day...so its not a 10 hour
                          > rest
                          > for ever 24 hour period. In your 60 or 70 hour work
                          > week...all
                          > you need is 36 hour off...1.5 days....and your weekly
                          > hours
                          > are reset beck to zero....come in Saturday morning and
                          > leave
                          > Sunday night.
                          >
                          > ____________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _________ _
                          > Cheap talk?
                          > Check out Yahoo! Messenger's low PC-to-Phone call rates.
                          > http://voice. yahoo.com
                          >
                          >
                          >

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