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Sloppy Response to Human Error Discussion

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  • fanofspam88
    William-- My apologies for the sloppy response. As a newbie to the website, I expected the reply function to provide a clean slate. Anyway, thanks for your
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 1, 2005
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      William--
      My apologies for the sloppy response. As a newbie to the website, I
      expected the "reply" function to provide a clean slate.

      Anyway, thanks for your feedback. We are in agreement with the fact
      that you should not base incident investiagtion on the factors
      involved but, rather, on the consequences involved (potential,
      actual). So, if my previous left that impression, I hope to dispel
      that quickly.

      However, what i mean to write was that our organization will apply
      different "requirements of rigor" dependent on the consequnces (not
      all of our "events" require Root Cause Investigations, for example).

      Lastly, yes, you were correct, here is my question to the group:
      Do you (any of you) have defined thresholds for determining what is
      a "human performance incident"? and Do you track and trend ownership
      of the these issues by department or other organization structure?

      Happy 4th to all!
      Thanks
      Jim
    • Dr. Bill Corcoran
      Jim, I take this to mean you would investigate a near miss electrocution because it had high potential consequences? But consequences is not the whole story.
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 6, 2005
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        Jim,
         
        I take this to mean you would investigate a near miss electrocution because it had high potential consequences?
         
        But consequences is not the whole story.
         
        Here are a few pin-ups to think about.
         
        It would seem to me that the investigation dollar should be allocated on significance, not consequences.
         
         
         
         
        Take care,
         
        Bill Corcoran
         
        W. R. Corcoran, Ph.D., P.E.
        NSRC Corporation
        21 Broadleaf Circle
        Windsor, CT 06095-1634
        Voice and voice mail: 860-285-8779
        Fax and voice mail to e-mail: 206-888-6772
        Mission: Saving lives, pain, assets, and careers through thoughtful inquiry.
         
        Call or e-mail me to ask about the full day Root Cause Analysis Training Workshop at Amelia Island, FL on August 11, 2005. It's open to all high hazard industry professionals.
        Or, better yet, register at http://www.ans.org/meetings/uwc/registration/
         
        For a complimentary subscription to our e-newsletter on root cause, organizational learning, and safety send a message to firebird.one@...
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Friday, July 01, 2005 10:25 AM
        Subject: [Root_Cause_State_of_the_Practice] Sloppy Response to Human Error Discussion

        William--
        My apologies for the sloppy response.  As a newbie to the website, I
        expected the "reply" function to provide a clean slate.

        Anyway, thanks for your feedback.  We are in agreement with the fact
        that you should not base incident investigation on the factors
        involved but, rather, on the consequences involved (potential,
        actual).  So, if my previous left that impression, I hope to dispel
        that quickly. 

        However, what I mean to write was that our organization will apply
        different "requirements of rigor" dependent on the consequences (not
        all of our "events" require Root Cause Investigations, for example).

        Lastly, yes, you were correct, here is my question to the group:
        Do you (any of you) have defined thresholds for determining what is
        a "human performance incident"? and Do you track and trend ownership
        of the these issues by department or other organization structure?

        Happy 4th to all!
        Thanks
        Jim






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