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RE: [RomfordHistory] Dagnam Park

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  • Phil Steer
    Dear Nicky, ... Welcome to the group! The following information is summarised from Volume VII of the Victoria History of the County of Essex, pp.66-67, by
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 1, 2000
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      Dear Nicky,

      > Im interested in finding out about the Manor
      > that was supposed to be in Harold hill.

      Welcome to the group! The following information is summarised from Volume
      VII of the Victoria History of the County of Essex, pp.66-67, by kind
      permission of the General Editor:

      "The manor of DAGENHAMS [the for 'Dagnam' or 'Dagnams' came into use in the
      18th century] and COCKERELS comprised two adjoining tenements lying north of
      the Romford-Brentwood Road, in the area now called Harold Hill. The
      tenements appear to have been identical to two held in the earlier 13th
      century by John of Weald: 3 1/2 virgates, later Dagenhams, and 1 virgate,
      later Cockerels. These were large virgates, of about 120 a. each...

      In 1772 Henry Muilman sold Dagenhams and Cockrels to (Sir) Richard Neave
      (Bt.), a West India merchant. The manor descended with the baronetcy until
      1948...[when] Sir Arundell Neave sold [the remaining 500 a. around Dagnam
      Park] to the London county council for the building (1948-58) of the Harold
      Hill housing estate...

      Dagenhams was listed among important seats in 1594, and was depicted in
      1663 as a gabled house, built round a courtyard, within a square moat. Sir
      Henry Wright, Bt. (d. 1664), rebuilt it on a modest scale c. 1660. Pepys,
      who visited Dagenhams in July 1665, said that it was the most noble and
      pretty house, for its size, that he had ever seen. [You can read his diary
      entries about his visits at
      http://www.bibliomania.com/NonFiction/Pepys/Diary/chap07.html - use your
      browser's Find function to search for Dagenhams.] It had 23 hearths in 1662
      and 24 in 1670. Between 1732 and 1739 the house was altered and enlarged by
      Edward Carteret. His additions included a private chapel. In 1771 Dagnams
      has a central block of two storeys with attics, containing eleven bays.
      That may have been the original house of c. 1660. It was flanked at each
      end by five-bay wings, also of two storeys, but without attics, possibly the
      additions made in the 1730s. Sir Richard Neave, Bt., who bought Dagnams in
      1772, demolished the old house and built a brick house of three storeys.
      The main front had nine bays, of which the central three bays were bowed.
      During the Second World War Dagnam Park was occupied by the Army. It was
      demolished in c. 1948."

      You can see Dagnam Park in John Cary's map of 1786 on my site at:
      http://www.romford.org/maps/cary/map-cary0405.htm
      (To view using the frames-based interface, request http://www.romford.org,
      click 'Maps | John Cary' in the Contents pane, then click on the right-hand
      side of the small map, just above half way down.)

      Compare this with Dagnam Park on a modern map at:
      http://www.streetmap.co.uk/streetmap.dll?G2M?X=554750&Y=192750&A=Y&Z=1

      The moat between Sedgefield Crescent and Settle Road is, according the the
      Victoria History, the site of Cockerels House:

      "Cockerels House was about 800 yd. south of Dagnams. In 1633 it was a
      substantial gabled building, standing outside a moated site which was by
      then an orchard. In the 19th century it became known as Dagnam Park Farm.
      It was demolished c. 1948. The moat still survived in 1977."

      This would place Dagnams roughly between the two wooded areas at the
      top-middle/top-right of the modern map. The Victoria History states that:
      "The pond immediately south of it still survived in 1976" - and you can see
      a pond in this area on the modern map, which may perhaps be the one that is
      mentioned. I would suspect that the track through Dagnam Park follows the
      line of the original entrance from the north, which you can see on the Cary
      map.

      Finally, there is a little about the Neave family of Dagnams on my "Romford
      Now & Then" website under 'People' (alternatively, you can search the site
      for Neave).

      I hope that this is of interest.

      Best Regards, Phil
    • Phil Steer
      Yesterday lunchtime I sent a reply to Nicky s request for some information about the history of Dagnams. It appeared on the eGroups website, but I never
      Message 2 of 4 , Aug 1, 2000
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        Yesterday lunchtime I sent a reply to Nicky's request for some
        information about the history of Dagnams. It appeared on the eGroups
        website, but I never received the email - I don't know if anyone else
        has? If you've not yet received the message, and would like to read
        it, you can do so at
        http://www.egroups.com/message/RomfordHistory/748.

        Best Regards, Phil
      • Bob Wells Tel: +44/0 1865 272915
        Phil wrote ... I received the message normally (in digest mode) and was extremely pleased to do so. I found it one of the most interesting contributions to the
        Message 3 of 4 , Aug 3, 2000
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          Phil wrote
          > If you've not yet received the message, and would like to read it,
          > you can do so at http://www.egroups.com/message/RomfordHistory/748

          I received the message normally (in digest mode) and was extremely pleased
          to do so. I found it one of the most interesting contributions to the list.
          Many thanks.

          Bob (wells@...)
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