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Re: Schooling

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  • kb0spq
    Hi, Carolyn, In Roman society, education for children was the responsibility of the paterfamilias. Usually this was accomplished by buying or paying for the
    Message 1 of 4 , Jul 1, 2002
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      Hi, Carolyn,

      In Roman society, education for children was the responsibility of the
      paterfamilias. Usually this was accomplished by buying or paying for
      the use of a tutor. Obviously, this would restrict the practice to
      the wealthy. Ideal fathers would instruct their children themselves.

      Some have postulated the use of graffiti as advertisements indicates
      a basic reading level for much of the urban population, but it is
      unlikely most peasant farmers would find much value in traditional
      education.

      Keep in mind that the Roman "retirement" was to purchase a farm and
      became a landowner/farmer, so many "farmers" would be well educated.
      Of course these gents are unlikely to have done more actual farming
      than picking a few grapes off the vine during a picnic, but they did
      live in the country, at least some of the time.

      In a purely fictional sense, a poor farmer may have learned to read
      or write as a boy by being a close friend of a wealthy boy and
      horning in on the other boys lessons. Just a possible example.

      --Mark Arvidson

      --- In Roman_History_Books@y..., "Carolyn Kleintank" <taxfree@c...>
      wrote:
      > I am writing something about Rome and have done a lot of research.
      > However, there is something I can't seem to find.
      > Is it safe to say that many people were illiterate?
      > If a farmer could read and write, how would he have come by such
      information?
      > Were only the wealthy in Rome exposed to education?
      >
      > If anyone could help, I would appreciate it.
      > Thanks
      > Carolyn
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Carolyn Kleintank
      Thanks for the thoughts..................... You have given me a good idea that I can work into the story. I appreciate it................... Carolyn ... From:
      Message 2 of 4 , Jul 2, 2002
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        Thanks for the thoughts.....................
        You have given me a good idea that I can work into the story.
        I appreciate it...................
        Carolyn
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "kb0spq" <mark-arvidson@...>
        To: <Roman_History_Books@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Tuesday, July 02, 2002 12:29 AM
        Subject: [Roman_History_Books] Re: Schooling


        > Hi, Carolyn,
        >
        > In Roman society, education for children was the responsibility of the
        > paterfamilias. Usually this was accomplished by buying or paying for
        > the use of a tutor. Obviously, this would restrict the practice to
        > the wealthy. Ideal fathers would instruct their children themselves.
        >
        > Some have postulated the use of graffiti as advertisements indicates
        > a basic reading level for much of the urban population, but it is
        > unlikely most peasant farmers would find much value in traditional
        > education.
        >
        > Keep in mind that the Roman "retirement" was to purchase a farm and
        > became a landowner/farmer, so many "farmers" would be well educated.
        > Of course these gents are unlikely to have done more actual farming
        > than picking a few grapes off the vine during a picnic, but they did
        > live in the country, at least some of the time.
        >
        > In a purely fictional sense, a poor farmer may have learned to read
        > or write as a boy by being a close friend of a wealthy boy and
        > horning in on the other boys lessons. Just a possible example.
        >
        > --Mark Arvidson
        >
        > --- In Roman_History_Books@y..., "Carolyn Kleintank" <taxfree@c...>
        > wrote:
        > > I am writing something about Rome and have done a lot of research.
        > > However, there is something I can't seem to find.
        > > Is it safe to say that many people were illiterate?
        > > If a farmer could read and write, how would he have come by such
        > information?
        > > Were only the wealthy in Rome exposed to education?
        > >
        > > If anyone could help, I would appreciate it.
        > > Thanks
        > > Carolyn
        > >
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
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