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Recent Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews

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  • IrenesBooks@aol.com
    Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.01.17 W.R. Johnson, Lucretius and the Modern World. This lepidus libellus from the pen of W. R. Johnson (J.) makes for a fun
    Message 1 of 1 , Mar 13, 2001
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      Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.01.17
      W.R. Johnson, Lucretius and the Modern World.

      "This lepidus libellus from the pen of W. R. Johnson (J.) makes for a fun
      read. Appearing in a new series with the trendy title "CLASSICAL
      INTER/FACES," the book provides an introduction to the De rerum natura itself
      and tells the story of Lucretius' reception from the seventeenth century
      onward. To judge from the title as well as from the book's cover, which shows
      Lucretius in profile before a billowing nuclear mushroom, the purpose of the
      work is to present a Lucretius "for our times." But make no mistake about it:
      this is not some well-meaning and well-mannered humanistic attempt to make a
      classic palatable to a wider audience. What this fascinating and unabashedly
      personal book amounts to is nothing less than an impassioned Epicurean
      manifesto. "

      Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.01.20
      B. Levick, Vespasian.

      "Levick has produced a balanced, thoughtful and thoroughly comprehensive
      treatment of her subject. It will surely remain the standard work on
      Vespasian for years to come. "

      Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001.02.27
      John F. Matthews, Laying Down the Law. A Study of the Theodosian Code.

      "M. has made a great contribution to the understanding of how the Theodosian
      code was conceived, prepared, edited, and publicised. He underlines the
      features of the law collection: it belongs to juristic traditions on the one
      hand, and expresses a contemporary reality on the other. Though many of the
      details mentioned in the book had been discussed and known before, M. not
      only draws an overall picture of the historical and editorial
      interpretations, but has a lot of new ideas and observations, and contributes
      to our understanding of late Roman history. M. discerns the Theodosian law
      codex as a reflex and a promotion of the new unity of the eastern and western
      parts of the empire. "

      Irene
      http://members.nbci.com/placida/
      Co-host, Ancient/Classical History Forum
      http://www.delphi.com/ab-ancienthist/start
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